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Re: facial proportions or seeing skills?

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From: Judy Decker (jdecker_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Mar 07 2004 - 19:04:09 PST


Thanks Marvin.... as always wonderful lesson for us!

Your process defines the approach Gina Grant took in her portraits. I don't
think anyone saw that link at the bottom of my post.
These are fourth grade portraits (I think I mistakenly called them 6th
grade)
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Teachers/ggrant.htm

My students never memorized a formula for portraits. We did do some
measuring to see how those formulas were developed. I did the"no no" by have
having a prepared handout though that showed the proportions (that I created
myself along with some separate drawings for the facial features). I did
self portraits by close observation using mirrors. They weren't as perfect
as the Photoshop generated ones - but the achieved what I was trying to
achieve. Using a grid is a good math skill --and when art lessons were to be
math and science focused - the grid was a good tool to introduce. I used it
with the Heroes portraits...and Renaissance inspired portraits -- although I
did allow students to see things differently, too.

Maybe your post will inspire Mike to have students try the portraits from
observation and others from the Grid as planned? Maybe give them a choice?
Or do two portraits? It will be interesting to see how his lesson changes
and develops now.

Judy Decker

----- Original Message -----
From: Marvin Bartel
To: ArtsEdNet Talk
Sent: Monday, March 08, 2004 12:28 AM
Subject: facial proportions or seeing skills?

......Learning to draw by learning to see goes beyond knowing what certain
things look like. Learning the specific techniques of seeing better helps
us find out what everything looks like. There are good methods to teach
seeing and drawing without resorting to other people's formulas. Teach
students how to observe/express and students can draw/express anything - not
only those things for which they have memorized a formula..............

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