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Fwd: from NAEA Fw: "WHERE’S THE ART?" CAMPAIGN

---------

Mrsbeeswax_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Thu Mar 28 2002 - 03:41:21 PST


 To: <undisclosed-recipients:>
 Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 11:46 PM
 Subject: "WHERE’S THE ART?" CAMPAIGN
 
 
 NAEA MEDIA RELEASE
 NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
 Office of the Executive Director
 Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
 Home Page—http://www.naea-reston.org
 E-mail: naea@dgs.dgsys.com
 
 For release March 28, 2002
 
 
 NAEA PRESIDENT ANNOUNCES
 AGENDA FOR STUDENT LEARNING
 "WHERE’S THE ART?" CAMPAIGN
 
 Campaign to focus on nation’s
 arts education policy deficiencies
 
 
 MIAMI BEACH, FL—NAEA President Mac Arthur Goodwin released in March 2001 a
 national art education report "Visual Arts Education: Setting An Agenda For
 Improving Student Learning." According to Goodwin "NAEA committed to
 providing resources to inform art education policy decisions to guide the
 field by undertaking initiatives to: 1) clarify the content of visual arts
 instruction, curriculum, and assessment; 2) foster implementation of
 delivery
 standards; and 3) inform professional development, and teacher preparation
 practices."
 
 "To guide the Agenda we researched the extent arts education policies were
 in
 place that would enable student learning in art in the nation’s schools. We
 found deficiencies in policies and programs that excluded many students and,
 in other examples, children are simply being left behind," stated Goodwin.
 
 "For example," said Goodwin, "about half of our elementary schools have no
 art teachers. When children do not master basic visual arts knowledge and
 skills in their elementary schooling, it may be caused by the lack of sub
 stantive, standards based- art instruction. As a result, students enter
 middle, junior and senior high schools with first and second grade art
 skills. They become "remedial" art students. Thus students—and their
 teachers, play ‘catch up’ for their remaining years of schooling. Learning
 requires sustained effort—studying a subject over time, building on
 knowledge
 in a sequential fashion, gaining a historical perspective, and developing a
 certain level of subject mastery such as those recommended in state and
 local
 curriculum frameworks."
 
 
  "American schools have made incredible gains that focus on student learning
 in art. Most states have identified art knowledge and skills students should
 learn and thousands of art teachers have redesigned their curriculum and
 realigned their instructional practices. School districts and universities
 are working together on new professional development and continuing
 education
 programs. Yet, 95% of the states do not conduct statewide assessments in
 the
 arts. How are we to know if our students are learning?"
 
 In another example, "we found thirty-four states do not license or certify
 art teachers based on specific art standards. It is a myth to think anyone
 can teach art that has not mastered art education content, knowledge, and
 skills. Good art teachers know how to guide and encourage student learning,
 how to plan productive lessons and diagnose students’ problems, as well as
 knowing the art content to be taught."
 
 Other highlights of the findings are:
 
 o Sixty-five percent of the higher education institutions computing GPA's do
 not count arts grades.
 o Thirty-nine states do not require arts for university admissions.
 o Seventeen states (35.4%) and that nearly 40% of public secondary schools
 do
 not require arts as a part of graduation requirements.
 o Twelve percent of the states have no arts education mandate.
 One way to increase the probability that something will not be learned is to
 ensure that it will not be taught. Thus, large and important legacies of
 art
 and culture go unseen, unheard, unread, unstudied, and unlearned, and many
 of
 our children are being left behind.
 
 "Because we share a common goal: improving student learning," said Goodwin,
 "I also call upon other education organizations and education legislators,
 departments of education, school boards, principals, and parents to embrace
 the agenda."
 
 "The purpose of the campaign," said Goodwin, "is to bring national attention
 to the arts education policy deficiencies and the effects they have on the
 nation’s young citizenry. More specifically, we wish to encourage the
 press/media, legislators, and parents to generate public understanding the
 importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art."
 
 "To accomplish this will require substantive collaboration among education
 stakeholders and policymakers centered on improving student art learning. It
 will also require the support and commitment of many groups within the
 Association to initiate innovative activities in their states and regions
 that focus on improving policies for student learning in art."
 
 Copies of "Visual Arts Education: Setting An Agenda For Improving Student
 Learning" can be down loaded (pdf) in the recent news section of the NAEA
 web
 site at www.naea-reston.org.
 
 # # #
 Attachment: What Can You Do?
 
 
 What Can You Do?
 
 o Lead efforts to generate public understanding of the ideas behind the
 importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
 o Develop services that orient your constituents to art education policies
 needed to achieve student art learning.
   o Implement leadership strategies to advance education policies for
 quality
 art learning.
 
 What Can Parents Do?
 
 o Encourage the press/media to generate public understanding of the
 importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
 o Encourage your school board to support better policies for art education
 programs that lead to student learning in art.
 o Discuss/recommend improved art education policies with your child’s school
 principal.
 o Devote time at a PTA meeting to review how art education policies can
 enhance the quality of art education for all students. Develop support
 activities through the PTA.
 
 What Can School Board Members Do?
 
 o Ensure that district education policies promote K-12 art study as basic
 education for all students.
 o Adopt education policies that include high levels of accomplishment in
 the
 visual arts.
   o Make quality teaching and student art learning a critical part of your
 district improvement efforts.
 o Develop policies that require rigorous professional development and
 continuing education programs for those who teach the arts disciplines.
 
 What Can Governors, Legislators, and State Officials Do?
 
 o Ensure that state education policies promote K-12 art study as basic
 education for all students.
 o Adopt education requirements/regulations/statutes that include high
 levels
 of accomplishment in the visual arts.
 o Maintain policies that require rigorous professional development and
 continuing education programs at the graduate levels for those who teach the
 arts disciplines.
 o Include study of the arts disciplines in all presentations of state goals
 and policies for elementary and secondary education.
  o Support the development of a state inventory of effective art education
 policies to encourage comparison to current practice and make appropriate
 adjustments when current policies do not seem congruent with national
 standards.
 
 What Can State Art Education Associations Do?
 
 o Lead efforts to generate public understanding of the ideas behind the
 importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
 o Develop services that orient members to art education policy development,
 especially those policies needed to achieve student learning.
 o Implement advocacy strategies for (1) higher education, (2) state
 education
 agencies, and (3) local school districts to advance education policies for
 quality art learning.
 
 What Can Arts Councils Do?
 
 o Encourage the press/media to generate public understanding of the
 importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
 o Advocate state education policies that promote K-12 art study as basic
 education for all students.
 o Advocate education requirements/regulations/statutes that include high
 levels of accomplishment in the visual arts.
  o Recognize teachers/schools/districts/agencies/legislators who
 successfully
 implement arts education policies i.e., requirements/regulations/statutes
 that include high levels of accomplishment in the visual arts. >>

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Ron
----- Original Message -----
From: <TAH1916@aol.com>
To: <undisclosed-recipients:>
Sent: Wednesday, March 27, 2002 11:46 PM
Subject: "WHERE’S THE ART?" CAMPAIGN

NAEA MEDIA RELEASE
NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
Office of the Executive Director
Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
Home Page—http://www.naea-reston.org
E-mail: naea@dgs.dgsys.com

For release March 28, 2002

NAEA PRESIDENT ANNOUNCES
AGENDA FOR STUDENT LEARNING
"WHERE’S THE ART?" CAMPAIGN

Campaign to focus on nation’s
arts education policy deficiencies

MIAMI BEACH, FL—NAEA President Mac Arthur Goodwin released in March 2001 a
national art education report "Visual Arts Education: Setting An Agenda For
Improving Student Learning." According to Goodwin "NAEA committed to
providing resources to inform art education policy decisions to guide the
field by undertaking initiatives to: 1) clarify the content of visual arts
instruction, curriculum, and assessment; 2) foster implementation of
delivery
standards; and 3) inform professional development, and teacher preparation
practices."

"To guide the Agenda we researched the extent arts education policies were
in
place that would enable student learning in art in the nation’s schools. We
found deficiencies in policies and programs that excluded many students and,
in other examples, children are simply being left behind," stated Goodwin.

"For example," said Goodwin, "about half of our elementary schools have no
art teachers. When children do not master basic visual arts knowledge and
skills in their elementary schooling, it may be caused by the lack of sub
stantive, standards based- art instruction. As a result, students enter
middle, junior and senior high schools with first and second grade art
skills. They become "remedial" art students. Thus students—and their
teachers, play ‘catch up’ for their remaining years of schooling. Learning
requires sustained effort—studying a subject over time, building on
knowledge
in a sequential fashion, gaining a historical perspective, and developing a
certain level of subject mastery such as those recommended in state and
local
curriculum frameworks."

 "American schools have made incredible gains that focus on student learning
in art. Most states have identified art knowledge and skills students should
learn and thousands of art teachers have redesigned their curriculum and
realigned their instructional practices. School districts and universities
are working together on new professional development and continuing
education
programs. Yet, 95% of the states do not conduct statewide assessments in
the
arts. How are we to know if our students are learning?"

In another example, "we found thirty-four states do not license or certify
art teachers based on specific art standards. It is a myth to think anyone
can teach art that has not mastered art education content, knowledge, and
skills. Good art teachers know how to guide and encourage student learning,
how to plan productive lessons and diagnose students’ problems, as well as
knowing the art content to be taught."

Other highlights of the findings are:

o Sixty-five percent of the higher education institutions computing GPA's do
not count arts grades.
o Thirty-nine states do not require arts for university admissions.
o Seventeen states (35.4%) and that nearly 40% of public secondary schools
do
not require arts as a part of graduation requirements.
o Twelve percent of the states have no arts education mandate.
One way to increase the probability that something will not be learned is to
ensure that it will not be taught. Thus, large and important legacies of
art
and culture go unseen, unheard, unread, unstudied, and unlearned, and many
of
our children are being left behind.

"Because we share a common goal: improving student learning," said Goodwin,
"I also call upon other education organizations and education legislators,
departments of education, school boards, principals, and parents to embrace
the agenda."

"The purpose of the campaign," said Goodwin, "is to bring national attention
to the arts education policy deficiencies and the effects they have on the
nation’s young citizenry. More specifically, we wish to encourage the
press/media, legislators, and parents to generate public understanding the
importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art."

"To accomplish this will require substantive collaboration among education
stakeholders and policymakers centered on improving student art learning. It
will also require the support and commitment of many groups within the
Association to initiate innovative activities in their states and regions
that focus on improving policies for student learning in art."

Copies of "Visual Arts Education: Setting An Agenda For Improving Student
Learning" can be down loaded (pdf) in the recent news section of the NAEA
web
site at www.naea-reston.org.

# # #
Attachment: What Can You Do?

What Can You Do?

o Lead efforts to generate public understanding of the ideas behind the
importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
o Develop services that orient your constituents to art education policies
needed to achieve student art learning.
  o Implement leadership strategies to advance education policies for
quality
art learning.

What Can Parents Do?

o Encourage the press/media to generate public understanding of the
importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
o Encourage your school board to support better policies for art education
programs that lead to student learning in art.
o Discuss/recommend improved art education policies with your child’s school
principal.
o Devote time at a PTA meeting to review how art education policies can
enhance the quality of art education for all students. Develop support
activities through the PTA.

What Can School Board Members Do?

o Ensure that district education policies promote K-12 art study as basic
education for all students.
o Adopt education policies that include high levels of accomplishment in
the
visual arts.
  o Make quality teaching and student art learning a critical part of your
district improvement efforts.
o Develop policies that require rigorous professional development and
continuing education programs for those who teach the arts disciplines.

What Can Governors, Legislators, and State Officials Do?

o Ensure that state education policies promote K-12 art study as basic
education for all students.
o Adopt education requirements/regulations/statutes that include high
levels
of accomplishment in the visual arts.
o Maintain policies that require rigorous professional development and
continuing education programs at the graduate levels for those who teach the
arts disciplines.
o Include study of the arts disciplines in all presentations of state goals
and policies for elementary and secondary education.
 o Support the development of a state inventory of effective art education
policies to encourage comparison to current practice and make appropriate
adjustments when current policies do not seem congruent with national
standards.

What Can State Art Education Associations Do?

o Lead efforts to generate public understanding of the ideas behind the
importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
o Develop services that orient members to art education policy development,
especially those policies needed to achieve student learning.
o Implement advocacy strategies for (1) higher education, (2) state
education
agencies, and (3) local school districts to advance education policies for
quality art learning.

What Can Arts Councils Do?

o Encourage the press/media to generate public understanding of the
importance of art education policies that lead to student learning in art.
o Advocate state education policies that promote K-12 art study as basic
education for all students.
o Advocate education requirements/regulations/statutes that include high
levels of accomplishment in the visual arts.
 o Recognize teachers/schools/districts/agencies/legislators who
successfully
implement arts education policies i.e., requirements/regulations/statutes
that include high levels of accomplishment in the visual arts.

---