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Re: Purchasing student work

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From: Sidnie Miller (sidmill_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Mar 11 2002 - 18:24:26 PST


A student of mine just send a super clay piece to the Scholastic show in
our state. The director of the show called and offered to buy his piece
altho he was not awarded a key. The director didn't offere a price, so
the student came to me and asked what to ask. The piece was 20 inches
tall and was 4 pots connected together and then carved with aztez designs
we put on it with an overhead. It was gorgeous. I said ask $500--we
finally decided to ask $250 which repesented my time helping, his time
over 1 1/2 months of work, materials and glaze. The guy only would give
him $60--which was fine since he really wanted to keep it anyway and he
was flattered to be offered anything. He kept it.

Now, we are teaching the kids to value their work. Hell no, don't give it
away. At the very least figure out time and materials valuing at least
$10 /hour. And ask the kids if they really want to part with the work.
Most would rather keep it. Wouldn't you let the kids take the work home??
If so then let them sell if they want and keep the money. You as an art
club or class could offer portraits to the staff and ask a set price--I
can't believe $50 isn't about right. Teachers are notoriously cheap--if
they don't value the student's work--ok, but don't give it away--put the
assignment in their portfolios. Sid

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# Sidnie Miller #
# Elko High School #
# College Avenue #
# Elko, NV 89801 #
# 702-738-7281 #
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