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Lesson Plans


ON ART INSTRUCTION

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Robert Beeching (robprod)
Fri, 25 Jun 1999 12:55:07 -0700


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----- Original Message -----=20
From: Robert Beeching=20
To: dana artsednet=20
Sent: Friday, June 25, 1999 12:50 PM
Subject: RE: ART INSTRUCTION

Hi Dana,

In answer to your questions on the history of visual arts =
implementation:
a.. My experience: K through college levels of instruction; corporate =
and goverment agency re-training, motion picture and television art =
direction.
a.. Core Structures: K/3, 4/6, 7/8; Secondary Art: 1,2,3, and 4 -Adult =
Training.
a.. I am on call for in-service training, and program implementation.
Your concerns are shared by many. Unfortunately, during the 60s, =
many teachers of art were forced into other fields, or had to secure =
advance degrees (particularly at the college level) in order to maintain =
or advance their postions. Paradoxically, Ph.D. programs are weighted on =
the side of oral and written examination rather than on non-verbal =
production. At Stanford, I was an exception by being allowed to produce =
a film (on my classroom experiences) rather than writing a dissertation =
on them.
=20
Most college professors of art had to obtain their degrees, not by =
producing, but by talking and writing about the "art process". =
Consequently, we now have a bevy of Ph.Ds and Ed.Ds who concentrate more =
on talking about visual arts than on how to produce them. Currently, =
college visual arts methods courses (if they exist) concentrate mainly =
on the history and philosophy rather than on implementation and =
process/skill development.

A separation still exists between "art education" and "art training" =
at the college level. Those seeking a secondary credential are required =
to learn many different traditional techniques and processes whereas =
those who pursue an elementary credential are not. This tends to widen =
the educational gap between teachers in general.

If we are to change the way the current general population views the =
Arts, we must begin with kindergarten as we do with the introduction of =
reading, writing, and arithmetic skills. Methods courses must reflect =
this change if we are to attempt to halt this futile game of "Catch Up". =
Can you imagine someone teaching reading, writing, or math without =
having any previous experience in these subjects? That is what we are =
expecting of teachers at the primary level.

There is little art instruction support at the elementary level. =
Perhaps, that is why so often we find teachers confusing crafts projects =
with art instruction and production. We must try to discourage what is =
euphemisically referred to as art, but is nothing more than summer camp =
crafts, and begin to introduce teachers to a scope and sequence approach =
to art training. This has been and still is my vocation in life. We tend =
to encourage children to talk about life, and rarely instruct them on =
how to produce it!
=20
I have produced two web sites that support this thesis at:
=20
http://members.tripod.com/robprod
and
http://www.sierratel.com/robprod

ENJOY!

=20
=20
=20
=20

=20

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----- Original Message -----=20
From: Robert=20 Beeching
To: dana artsednet
Sent: Friday, June 25, 1999 12:50 PM
Subject: RE: ART INSTRUCTION

    Hi Dana,
 
        In answer = to your=20 questions on the history of visual arts implementation:
    Your concerns are shared by many. = Unfortunately, during the 60s, many teachers of art were forced  = into other=20 fields, or had to secure advance degrees (particularly at the college = level) in=20 order to maintain or advance their postions. Paradoxically, Ph.D. = programs are=20 weighted on the side of oral and written examination rather than on = non-verbal=20 production.  At Stanford, I was an = exception by=20 being allowed to produce a film (on my classroom experiences) rather = than=20 writing a dissertation on them.
 
     Most college professors of = art had to=20 obtain their degrees, not by producing, but by talking and writing about = the=20 "art process". Consequently, we now have a bevy of Ph.Ds and = Ed.Ds who=20 concentrate more on talking about visual arts than on how to = produce them.=20 Currently, college visual arts methods courses (if they exist) = concentrate=20 mainly on the history and philosophy rather than on=20 implementation and process/skill development.
 
    A separation still exists between = "art=20 education" and "art training" at the college level. Those seeking a = secondary=20 credential are required to learn many different traditional techniques = and=20 processes whereas those who pursue an elementary credential are not. = This tends=20 to widen the educational gap between teachers in general.
 
    If we are to change the way the = current=20 general population views the Arts, we must begin with kindergarten = as we do=20 with the introduction of reading, writing, and arithmetic skills. = Methods=20 courses must reflect this change if we are to attempt to halt this = futile game=20 of "Catch Up". Can you imagine someone teaching reading, writing, or = math=20 without having any previous experience in these subjects? That is what = we are=20 expecting of teachers at the primary level.
 
    There is little = art instruction=20 support at the elementary level. Perhaps, that is why so often we = find=20 teachers confusing crafts projects with=20 art instruction and production. We must try to = discourage what is euphemisically referred to as art, but is = nothing more=20 than summer camp crafts, and begin to introduce teachers to a scope and = sequence=20 approach to art training. This has been and still is my vocation in = life. We tend to encourage children to talk about = life, and=20 rarely instruct them on how to produce it!
 
    I have produced two web sites = that support=20 this thesis at:
 
http://members.tripod.com/robp= rod
and
http://www.sierratel.com/robpro= d
 
ENJOY!
 
 
     
 
     
 
   
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