Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: Petition: Subject NEA

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Michael Keller (keller)
Mon, 29 Jun 1998 22:03:50 -0400


The NPR/NEA petition is an internet chain letter, and NOT a legitimate
request for action. PLEASE do not forward it to anyone, and if you did,
please send them this message to explain. I found the following on the CIAC
web site (more on CIAC below):

>>>begin quote
PBS and NPR - Petition

Below is a prime example of a chain letter that keeps circulating the
Internet. If you receive this chain letter, please delete.

David Brumley, the Network Administer at University of Northern Colorado
informed CIAC of the following: "In 1995, a couple of students wrote a
letter and sent it out to support funding for PBS and NPR. This letter was
not intended to be a hoax, but instead was only a misguided attempt by some
students of ours to do some good. After reading through the CIAC section on
HOAX's, I decided to go ahead and verify that in fact this one should not be
circulated. The students (one of whom has left the university since the
posting) have been reprimanded."
<<<end quote

The posting then states the letter that was posted to this list, verbatim.
You can read the complete posting at
http://ciac.org/ciac/CIACChainLetters.html

To explain the CIAC:

>>>
CIAC provides on-call technical assistance and information to Department of
Energy (DOE) sites faced with computer security incidents. This central
incident handling capability is one component of all encompassing service
provided to the DOE community. The other services CIAC provides are:
awareness, training, and education; trend, threat, vulnerability data
collection and analysis; and technology watch.
<<<

The CIAC web site has a very comprehensive list of confirmed virus warnings,
and an interesting and comprehensive list, with explanations, of virus
hoaxes (eg Penpals, Good Times Virus etc), chain letters (as above) and
Internet Urban Legends (like the kidney harvesting). If you;re not familiar
with any of these, I suggest a vists to the site for a few laughs, and more
importantly, some educations, because you WILL be seeing these messages in
your email and you will want to know what to do (which is usually, trash
it).

As educators, you can also help to educate the Internet newbies in your
schools. They will be getting these emails as well, and they'll be
forwarding them to you and everyone else they know and love, and if you can
stop them before they email, it'll be a little bit better for everyone.

URL of note: http://ciac.org/

--
Michael Keller
Old and New Media