Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: Paper Mache Masks

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
freckles spots (freckles_spot)
Sun, 21 Jun 1998 13:54:55 PDT


This is an idea I did several times with much success....but they are
smaller than you want. Maybe you can work from this idea.

Supplies
styro meat or fruit tray....they do come in different sizes
Toilet paper tubes
egg cartons
lots of masking tape

For the first phase, have the students look at the masks and their
symmetry and geometric shapes. Give each student a styro tray and
various other supplies. Ask them to cut and build their masks using the
styro tray as a base. Tell them NOT to just leave the tray it's basic
shape. These do come in different sizes so that may help for some
variety.

This will require lots of masking tape and boy, do they love masking
tape.

Second phase
Paper mache the masks with a layer or two of newspaper.
when they are done Paper mache, have them draw their mask and design
them. Think about colors used by the Africans in their masks.

Third phase
Final layer of paper mache with brown paper towels. When dry, this
gives it a look of wood and you also know that you have at least two
layers of Paper mache on the mask.

Final phase
With their drawing in hand, have the start decorating the masks. I use
oil pastels sometimes, just so they don't cover the entire mask with
paint. Other times I have given the students skinny paint brushes so it
was impossible to cover the entire mask.
Also you may want to say something about blood and guts. They are not
in the African masks, and you may want to let them know up front what
you expect.
As a finishing touch, I offer raffia to the students to hang from their
masks. They usually love this touch because it makes their masks look
even more real.

hope this helps. Instead of the styro meat trays, you may want to go to
a computer store and ask them for their large styro pieces. I have
thought about do that but the size of my room limited me.

>From Judy
in Oklahoma...

>From: ARTYBRENDA
>Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 08:38:18 EDT
>To: Artsednet.edu
>Subject: Paper Mache Masks
>
>Dear Netters,
>
>I just got hired to do a specialty workshop at a summer camp. I am a
big fan
>of Paper Mache, and all the paper arts in general, But I'm
inexperienced at
>teaching and running limited workshops (I am expecting approximetly 15
>students 6th, 7th, and 8th grade. I will have a counsler aid. The
subject is
>to make large african tribal masks. My workshops will be 4 2hr.
sessions. ( 1
>session per week) This will allow drying time between the stages. I am
all
>set with samples of actual wooden carved masks as examples. The masks
vary in
>size, shape and content. My goal is for the kids to be as creative as
they
>can, I don't want the masks to be the same. The owners of the camp
will be
>displing these peices in a cultural arts exhibit later in the summer. I
am an
>artist studing to be an art teacher. I really want this workshop to be
a
>success and you never know how well you can teach until you jump right
in, But
>I could definetly use some advice:
>
>I really see these masks being large, 18'' to 21/2' for a hight
dimention .
>What would be a good support? Should I make a corrugated cardboard
base? How
>do you get the kids to be the designers, or get them to plan in
advance. (when
>they are working on their masks features) I am having trouble figuring
out a
>support system for the mache. I thought of using chicken wire with
paper pulp
>- but I don't think the kids could handle it. In other classes I have
taught
>the projects were all one uniform size. How do you go about getting a
variety
>of results, I would imagine the students who are truly intrested will
want to
>do the most eloborate masks, What to do with the ones who won't try?
>
>How should I space out the class in terms of stages: Macheing ,
sanding,
>painting collaging ( I have some really nice hand made papers that
could be
>used as a finished surface) and finally sealling- what to do with early
>finishers. Is the time aloted enough time?
>
>I would appericiate any advice you could give me to make this a
success.
>
>Thanks so much in advance,
>
>Brenda Riback
>artybrenda
>

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com