Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: Mask Ideas

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Jerry Vilenski (jvilensk)
Mon, 15 Jun 1998 20:52:29 -0700


artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> artsednet-digest Monday, June 15 1998 Volume 02 : Number 816
>
> This edition includes :
> batik ideas
> Art Trips Abroad
> Re; Hermitage Masterpieces
> Article on totem poles
> Re: batik ideas
> Re: Calder--YES!
> re: real artists, cool artists...
> Athlete Artists....
> great artists, cool artists etc.etc.
> Re: Block Scheduling
> Printing at art camp
> Re: Athlete Artists....
> PBS Calder and others
> Re: batik/mask ideas
> Re: Nancy Graves and Calder sights.
> Re: Printing at art camp
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 13:53:05 EDT
> From: Lynnzi
> Subject: batik ideas
>
> I am getting ready to teach a two week class to 3-5th graders on batik. Does
> anyone have any great ideas. I have several crayon melters and am not sure if
> that is the way to go.
>
> I also need some new wonderful mask ideas. I am also teaching a mask making
> class. One of the masks is going to be a plaster gauze mask on the childrens
> faces. I am tired of paper mache masks. Does anyone have any different ideas
> for interesting masks? I think we are going to make "beast masks" to go
> along with the story Beauty and the Beast. Again, the children are 3-5th
> grade. Thanks for your help. Have a great summer.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 14:28:37 -0400
> From: p-lstudio (betti longinotti)
> Subject: Art Trips Abroad
>
> Are there some of you out there that take trips abroad with your
> students? Do you ever orient these as sketching or studio trips? I
> have had this idea brewing over a few years but haven't acted on it. I
> would like to hear from some you that have expertise in this area.
>
> In Art & Life,
> Betti L.
> p-lstudio
> or on the www at
> http://www.angelfire.com/nc/plstudio
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 16:15:09 EDT
> From: MarshArt
> Subject: Re; Hermitage Masterpieces
>
> I am on a "commercial break" from my TV, watching the wonderful Hermitage
> Masterpieces Series shown on my local PBS network. It is a 3 hour program on
> the art at the Hermitage, which spans Western Art from the early centuries to
> Modern day.
> Check and see if your local PBS channel will air it soon by looking at their
> programming schedule on their website. You will really enjoy it! It is 3
> hours so make lots of popcorn and settle in.
>
> Marsha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 13:02:54 -0700
> From: mwhite (Maggie White)
> Subject: Article on totem poles
>
> Hi,
>
> For those of you interested in totem poles, there's an interesting
> article on contemporary carvers in the June Architectural Digest.
>
> Maggie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 21:34:38 -0400
> From: Kurt Hasselman <kprs>
> Subject: Re: batik ideas
>
> For batiks I would suggest doing a wind sock....What I did was take a rectangle of
> material, and make a hem on the top of about 1". (You will eventually, when they
> are batiked, sew the sides to make the "tube" making sure to keep the top 'hem"
> accessible to put a hanger "hoop" through. Then you attach three strings, on the
> hoop in 1/3rd increments, tie the strings together at the top to hang. We fringed
> the bottom by cutting strips). Then the kids work with the flat rectangle, making
> sure to mark off about 1/3 of the bottom, as this part will be "stripped" for the
> fringe. I had the kids do fish. Fish lend themselves well to "happy accidents" in
> batik, and will be swimming around the windsock when it is sewed together. They
> looked terrific, and everyone's was a success. (AND I did that in highschool
> crafts class, and the kids loved it, and by the way, so do their parents!).
>
> As for masks: One year I had the students take their pariscraft masks and turn
> them into landscapes. The noses make great "mountains", the eyes, "lakes", and
> they built additional things like trains, trees, houses out of pariscraft and
> added them to the horizontal faces. They were then painted. It took viewers
> awhile to get the face part, they enjoyed the landscapes first...and it turned out
> to be a pleasant surprise...
>
> San D
>
> Lynnzi wrote:
>
> > I am getting ready to teach a two week class to 3-5th graders on batik. Does
> > anyone have any great ideas. I have several crayon melters and am not sure if
> > that is the way to go.
> >
> > I also need some new wonderful mask ideas. I am also teaching a mask making
> > class. One of the masks is going to be a plaster gauze mask on the childrens
> > faces. I am tired of paper mache masks. Does anyone have any different ideas
> > for interesting masks? I think we are going to make "beast masks" to go
> > along with the story Beauty and the Beast. Again, the children are 3-5th
> > grade. Thanks for your help. Have a great summer.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 10:59:09 -0500
> From: "Debbie Nicholas" <dnick>
> Subject: Re: Calder--YES!
>
> I was in D.C. last week and got a chance to see the exhibit and agree it is
> great. I finally got a chance to go to the Freer Art Gallery as well as
> the National Gallery of Art on this visit. I had a fantastic time.
>
> Debbie Nicholas
> Linden-Kildare Jr. High
> 102 N. Taylor
> Linden, TX 75563
> dnick
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 02:05:52 EDT
> From: Zoomzaam
> Subject: re: real artists, cool artists...
>
> I often wonder about the "cool artist" issue. It really isn't a true issue
> because a cool artist is really in the eye of the beholder. What, are you
> going to think an artist is cool because someone else thought and told you so?
> Deep down, you know what you like and depending on your own personal culture
> (your background, your education, your choice of breakfast...), you'll be the
> one to judge who's cool.
>
> I work at the Santa Monica Museum of Art. It's the very museum that is
> currently exhibiting the Liza Lou work. I spend my days speaking to people
> who love art and I see the reactions of the visitors toward Lou's beaded
> wonders. Her work is touching people across the board, from 1 to 100 year
> olds representing a whole spectrum of society. Her work is very accessible,
> beautiful, and definetly "wowie-zowie", as Wendy Sauls says. And if you did a
> survey, about 99.9% will say that her work is "very cool". But there is that
> .1% that claim themselves to be "cool" and they'll find Lou's work to be
> "uncool", read "uninteresting". They'll criticize the generous,
> straightfoward beauty of the piece and say that there basically is nothing
> more to it than that: a pretty sculpture with no DEEP meaning. These are ones
> who think themselves the arbiters of cool. And then, when you see what they
> consider "cool", you either get it or you don't.
>
> I want to respect everyone's effort at expression when it comes to art. Art
> comes to us at many challenging levels. Liza Lou's work is a pick-me-up, for
> sure, personally, I see much more to it than a titanic effort in beading. I
> want to be able to decide what's cool and what is not for myself through
> seeing all kinds of work. The whole artworld may say something is "cool" but
> I'll make my own decision. So to ask who are the "REAL" artists is pretty
> futile in my view. Sure, we can reach a consensus on many but when it comes
> down, the "REAL" artist is the one that touches you and you alone first.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 05:35:45 EDT
> From: Melissasmi
> Subject: Athlete Artists....
>
> While encouraging some 5th graders concerning the possibility of combining art
> and making art with any occupation in their fututre life, one boy challenged
> me to name a pro athlete who is an artist. I assured him there were pro
> athletes who made art but he wants a name. He would like specifically an NBA
> artist...I'd get off the hook with any pro athlete. (And I don't consider
> Rodman's hair,body adornment art.) I am very much not into athletics...did a
> search on the web for quite awhile and found nothing. Maybe I'm wrong. If
> anyone knows of a pro athlete who makes art, please let me know ASAP. Thanks
> for your thoughts....Melissa Smith
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 10:13:48 -0500
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Subject: great artists, cool artists etc.etc.
>
> Hi all on the artsednet list. I have not been putting much into the
> conversation lately but always enjoy greatly to follow it. I think we donīt
> have to agree on so many things but rather respect each others views ,like
> we most of the time do it seems to me. I have been thinking about the
> discussion on "great artists", "cool artists" etc. etc. And it has reminded
> me of something a fellow art teacher once said to me. "If we look at the
> artists of the world as a pyramid, society or we ourselves always put the
> best on top, but in order for a pyramid to not crumble we have to have all
> the layers that hold up the top stones and the onces on the bottom or
> anywhere in the structure are as important as the top. Also today these
> artists maybe on top but who knows in 50 or 100 years to come." I think of
> this when I introduce my students to local artists, contemporary artists as
> well as the "masters", they are all equally important to the art education
> of the child.
> Regards froma the far north, Rosa
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 07:57:14 -0400
> From: "croberts" <b2w6w4kn>
> Subject: Re: Block Scheduling
>
> >Hi. My name is Paul. I teach 7-12 Art in a district of about 1,000
> >students. We art currently on an 8 period day during which I teach 7
> >sections of Art. The 7th and 8th grade classes are divided into four
> >groups that meet for 9wks. each as exploritory classes. The high school
> >offerings include Art I, II, III, and IV. We do a very good job of
> >providing students with a solid foundation in the visual arts, offering
> >everything from the basics to computer technology and philosophy.
> >Recently, the administration and school board have been pushing for a 4X4
> >block schedule.
> ...............................................
> I teach middle school, and this past year, we went to block scheduling.
> Prior to this, I had 2 classes each of 6th, 7th, and 8th graders. Sixth
> grade art is an exploratory class, and they have no choices as to what they
> take...they take each directed studies class (art, music, Spanish, etc.) for
> 9 weeks and rotate. So they were not included in the block scheduling.
> Their classes are back to back and this worked out. Our 7th and 8th graders
> do get to select the classes they are interested in.
>
> Our 7th and 8th graders went to the block (90 minutes) and we saw them every
> other day for a semester. All of their other classes were already on block
> prior to this year, but they meet daily. At first, there were only one or
> two of the directed studies teachers who were in favor of trying this, but
> MOST of them ended up liking this schedule better. Spanish teacher felt his
> students should have it daily, rather than every other day, but he did like
> the 90-minute block...said he could get way more accomplished. The PE
> teachers did not like having the students for 90 minutes....felt that it was
> too long a period for the students.
>
> In art, I always find that the students work better the first day of a
> continuing lesson. Their motivation is higher that first day. We were
> able to get more work done and the quality was much better. It was MUCH
> less tiring for me this year. In my classes prior to the block, I felt
> that all I was doing was "giving out instructions, passing out supplies,
> cleaning up, and getting ready to start over" again. The students never
> felt that they had enough time to even get started the first day. This was
> occurring over and over, 6 times a day.
>
> Many of the lessons could be started and completed in one block...and this
> was good.
>
> Now, I have the time to really teach the lesson and they have the time to do
> more work. Also, this year, I have put my lesson
> introductions/instructions/examples/relevant artist's works on the computer,
> using Power Point and they are fed into a large screen TV for all the
> students to be able to see. On the next class, I can just start this
> running in a loop for those who were absent on the prior class.
>
> My classes have been much smoother this year, work has been better, and it's
> been better for me. I've not been so tired, so I've been more motivated.
>
> Carolyn Roberts
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 09:41:07 EDT
> From: LilianBobo
> Subject: Printing at art camp
>
> Has anybody taught relief print making at a summer camp? I'm getting ready to
> leave at the end of this month and am getting nervous. It is a fine arts camp
> that I'll be working at but I'm not sure how interested the students will be
> in what I have to offer when painting, drawing & sculpting are their other
> choices. I've prepared quite a bit to guide them through multiple color block
> prints. I've also prepared direct prints from natural elements such as leaves
> & flowers, and have constructed relief plates out of paper, tape, cardboard,
> etc. It's a two week session in which I'll be working in the mornings with
> middle school people who are there specifically for the art classes. In the
> afternoons I'll have the music majors who take art as an elective. Depending
> on the experiences of the students I know I'll have to be flexible. A friend
> commented that what I have prepared doesn't seem challenging enough (3 color
> prints?) and that it won't hold their interest. I welcome any constructive
> comments, suggestions or experiences people might have to help me prepare for
> my class.
>
> Thank you, Susan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 Aug 1956 12:44:50 +0000
> From: "Louise Lutton" <lutton.us>
> Subject: Re: Athlete Artists....
>
> - ----------
> From: Melissasmi
> To: artsednet.edu
> Subject: Athlete Artists....
> Date: Mon, Jun 15, 1998, 9:35 AM
>
> While encouraging some 5th graders concerning the possibility of combining
> art
> and making art with any occupation in their fututre life, one boy
> challenged
> me to name a pro athlete who is an artist. I assured him there were pro
> athletes who made art but he wants a name. He would like specifically an
> NBA
> artist...I'd get off the hook with any pro athlete. (And I don't consider
> Rodman's hair,body adornment art.) I am very much not into athletics...did
> a
> search on the web for quite awhile and found nothing. Maybe I'm wrong. If
> anyone knows of a pro athlete who makes art, please let me know ASAP.
> Thanks
> for your thoughts....Melissa Smith
>
> Bellows was a baseball player at Ohio State and tried out for the Cincinnati
> Reds, I believe.
> Louise
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 11:30:35 EDT
> From: CRIZMACinc
> Subject: PBS Calder and others
>
> Dear artsedneters:
> For those who are interested, there is going to be a show on Calder this week
> on PBS's American Masters. In my area it is going to be on Wednesday at
> 9:00pm. There is also a fascinating series on Russian art and culture called
> "The Face of Russia." It is in three parts, with the first showing up this
> week. We got to preview this series on video and it is very well done, but
> written for adults or mature teens rather than for younger students. You can
> find out some great stuff from the PBS web site. They have teacher lesson
> plans and ways for students to interact with specific shows (Q & A). You can
> find out when shows will appear in your area also. Their site is www.pbs.org.
> Worth browsing through this summer. Enjoy!
>
> Amy Metcalfe
> CRIZMAC Art & Cultural Education Materials, Inc.
> Art Education Resources, Folk Art, Books, Music, Videos, and More!
> For a free catalog call (800) 913-8555 or write to:
> crizmacinc
> Check out our bimonthly Special Topics Newsletter at www.crizmac.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 09:09:27 +0300
> From: ttipton.tz
> Subject: Re: batik/mask ideas
>
> I recently did a couple of sessions with batik drawing on rectangles
> of heavy cardstock or tagboard with the wax after creating a pencil
> sketch. Then using brushes, students painted the colors on the paper
> over the wax. They were marvelous!
>
> As for masks, we just finished making our face masks into greek
> mythological characters, allowing them to express themselves in 20th
> century forms. Interesting what characters the mixture created.
>
> Regards,
> Teresa Tipton
>
> From: Lynnzi
> Date: Sun, 14 Jun 1998 13:53:05 EDT
> To: artsednet.edu
> Subject: batik ideas
>
> I am getting ready to teach a two week class to 3-5th graders on batik. Does
> anyone have any great ideas. I have several crayon melters and am not sure if
> that is the way to go.
>
> I also need some new wonderful mask ideas. I am also teaching a mask making
> class. One of the masks is going to be a plaster gauze mask on the childrens
> faces. I am tired of paper mache masks. Does anyone have any different ideas
> for interesting masks? I think we are going to make "beast masks" to go
> along with the story Beauty and the Beast. Again, the children are 3-5th
> grade. Thanks for your help. Have a great summer.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 12:49:13 -0400
> From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
> Subject: Re: Nancy Graves and Calder sights.
>
> I haven't had so much trouble finding information as I have with
> this artist. It would help if I could see her work. I know she was
> listed as a sculptor however no work is shown. So here are a few
> links to help out and inquire.
> Resources and listing for Sculptors:
> http://www.sculptor.org/
> also look up I.S.C. International Sculpture Center
> http://www.sculpture.org/documents/main.html
> the archives for sculpture magazine go back to may '96
> Teachers packet
> http://www.lacma.org/Education/TeachPacFormInfo9798.htm
> seems long I know. also (213)857-6512
>
> Calder Activities or links if nothing else.
> http://www.a1.com/children/caldeact.htm
> I hope it's not capital because my handwriting is so bad i can't
> even read it.
>
> So now I know I know so little on Sculpture but am intrigued by what
> I found. I have book marked a sight where there is sound sculpture
> and thought what a great idea for middle and high school kids to do
> a project on sound sculpture. If interested I can give you the sight
> and a lesson is rather easy to come up with the idea.
> Sandra
>
> ArtKin5 wrote:
> >
> > HELP!!!!!
> > I need any information on Nancy Graves by July 5. My district will be adding
> > the information into our curriculum on that day. We will be creating a lesson
> > incorporating her as a female artists. This will be geared for 2nd grade
> > level.
> >
> > Thanks in advance,
> > Nancy
>
> - --
> john barrick
> Sandra Barrick
> astroboy
> http://home.fuse.net/astroboy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 13:33:17 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Fran Marze <fmaiu+@pitt.edu>
> Subject: Re: Printing at art camp
>
> I've never taught at an art camp and you didn't tell the ages, but three
> color prints should be challenging enough. My high school students always
> wrestle with registration. Perhaps for fun, you could print on t shirts;
> There's a book you can get at all the big book stores The Great T Shirt
> Book about $12-14. It has great printing ideas to use with t shirts.
> could you do simple silkscreening; they may not have done that. Keep in
> touch; I'm sure someone will come up with some ideas. Fran
>
> My experience is that I like printmaking a lot better than most of my
> students!
>
> On Mon, 15 Jun 1998 LilianBobo wrote:
>
> > Has anybody taught relief print making at a summer camp? I'm getting ready to
> > leave at the end of this month and am getting nervous. It is a fine arts camp
> > that I'll be working at but I'm not sure how interested the students will be
> > in what I have to offer when painting, drawing & sculpting are their other
> > choices. I've prepared quite a bit to guide them through multiple color block
> > prints. I've also prepared direct prints from natural elements such as leaves
> > & flowers, and have constructed relief plates out of paper, tape, cardboard,
> > etc. It's a two week session in which I'll be working in the mornings with
> > middle school people who are there specifically for the art classes. In the
> > afternoons I'll have the music majors who take art as an elective. Depending
> > on the experiences of the students I know I'll have to be flexible. A friend
> > commented that what I have prepared doesn't seem challenging enough (3 color
> > prints?) and that it won't hold their interest. I welcome any constructive
> > comments, suggestions or experiences people might have to help me prepare for
> > my class.
> >
> > Thank you, Susan
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #816
> *******************************
>
> To post to the ArtsEdNet Talk Listserve, send e-mail to:
> artsednet
> *To unsubscribe from the listserv, send e-mail to:
> artsednet-request
> and type in the message area only: UNSUBSCRIBE
> *To send a message to the List-Owner, send e-mail to:
> artsednet
> *ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/
I have a mask project that I sort of invented out of a deep-seated need
for something different to do with the subject. I have kids (4th
graders) construct a paper mache mardi-gras type mask that is very
popular and quite striking when finished. Here are the materials used:
Black plastic "Lone-ranger masks", paper towels, scrap fome-core, paper
mache glue, feathers, junk jewelry parts, acrylic paints, masking tape,
other decorative junk.
Procedure: Have students construct an armature out of the black mask
and fomecore, using fomecore to form horns or noses, attaching them with
tape. Next, paper mache the mask by smearing the armature with glue on
both sides and applying 2 or 3 layers of white paper towels to
completely coat the mask. Using torn towels dipped in glue, kids can
mold the paper mache like clay and apply it to the mask to form
exaggerated evebrows, noses, etc. Punch out the eye-holes before drying
and save the string if you want to wear the mask later. Once dry, the
mask can be painted with acrylics, then decorated by piercing the paper
mache with holes and attaching feathers, jewels or anything that will
decorate the project. Note: the paper towels make a great surface to
pierce with holes and to paint and decorate. If you attempt decorating
just the plastic mask, you will probably be disappointed. You could
probably apply plaster gauze to this instead of p. mache...live on the
edge!! Jerry