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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #303

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Schectman - Riselle (riselles)
Thu, 5 Jun 1997 20:58:49 -0400 (EDT)


Integration of the arts is an easy if not natural topic! I have given a
brief talk on integration of art and science, yet in my school curriculum
I integrate for math, music, social studies and even literature. In=20
Science
I have had children analyze, experiment, compare and contrast. Not to
mention using critical thinking skills and higher level thinking. With
color mixing we have performed experiments using food coloring in a
petrie dish on the overhead. We have looked at prisms and talked about
reflections and color wheels. This covers changing states. We have also
talked about the Weather and created Wet chalk Weather pictures. Students
have been asked to act out-creative drama in groups wtihout words
different weather types such as tornado, thunderstorm and rainbow .This is
a good motivational tech. and is a wonderful coop. learning activity. I
have also had children create original book jackets (Lit. or reading) and
they loved writing the synopsis of their book on the left front flap, and
about the author-themselves on the right flap. I have assigned children
to write poems and then illustrate them or it can be done in reverse
order. Haikus lend themselves to watercolor illustration. Students study
dinosaurs , communities and outer space this lends itself to mural making.
How about Seasons a wonderful way to teach art and science. Take Ceramics-
glazing , shrinking, coiling, firing, are perfect springboards for
discussions on physical and chemical changes and how the kiln works. I
could go on forever but I've run out of time. Oh, and let's not forget
M.C. Escher and tesselations great math tie in.

Artfully Yours,
Riselle Schectman=20
Westowne Elementary School
& the Ho. Co. Ctr. for the Arts=20

On Thu, 5 Jun 1997 owner-artsednet-digest wrote:

>=20
> artsednet-digest Thursday, 5 June 1997 Volume 02 : Number=
303
>=20
> This edition includes:
> Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
> Re: 4x4 block
> integration of the arts
> graphic arts
> Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
> [none]
> Re: Clay Head Sculptures
>=20
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>=20
> From: Teresa Tipton <ttipton.wa.us>
> Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 18:50:19 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
>=20
> Disagreements are the fodder of growth; cognitive dissonance is essential
> for learning, so why stifle it?
>=20
> This discussion is really important and I think more needs to be said. I
> am losing a fifth grader who is one of the best artists in school to a
> gang and I have gone through all the emotions and words and efforts to tr=
y
> and bring him back by using his art as a lever.
>=20
> I said before that I found something missing and I still feel that in the
> discussion. It's one thing to remove graffiti and to set limits, rules an=
d
> standards of conduct. I see that as our responsibility as adults guiding
> young people who are still developmentally growing. At the same time, I
> find some of the posts to be polarized against the use of the symbols
> because of tagging, missing a wonderful learning opportunity to try and
> transform both the meaning of the symbol employed and its relevance to it=
s
> users.
>=20
> I myself "ban" smiley faces and corner suns with sunglasses because of
> their overuse. I challenge students to look beyond the cliche and
> represent what the symbol stands for some other way. If a gang member
> identifies with the yin yang symbol then my approach would be to have the
> student in their art show what aspects of the symbol they identify with.
> Query how the student can represent aspects of themselves some other way.
> Get them to look at what the symbol represents; how it's been used
> culturally; what it means personally and to draw that without using the
> symbol , if in fact it is banned from class.
>=20
> I want to make the distinction between erasing an image because it is in
> an inappropriate place or it is used inappropriately and discounting thos=
e
> who use it or who have identified with it.=20
>=20
> We only polarize the behavior and the impetus when we ban these things
> without QUERY, DISCUSSION, CHALLENGE, and most of all, confrontration wit=
h
> those souls who have identified themselves with something that we may not
> understand.
>=20
> We may find gang behavior distasteful and abhorrent but it has a
> legitimacy as an expression of disenfranchisement. It exists because of
> cultural and social issues we have not faced in our society.
>=20
> We cannot make it go away by erasing its symbols. But we neglect our role
> as educators if all we do is erase and ban images without trying to delve
> into their more significant meansings and aspects. We have an opportunity
> to reach out to those kids who use the symbols and help them make real
> linkages between the meaning of the symbols and their lives beyond
> tagging. After all, each of is "tagging" everyday - my car, my home, my
> wallet, my purse, my money, my space....Tagging is a part of repitilian
> brain behavior and let's be honest folks - all of us have repitilian part=
s
> to our brains.
>=20
> I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual. I think o=
f
> the Living Stage Theatre company in D.C. that goes into the inner city
> with Shakespeare and teaches gang members how to act by using the materia=
l
> from their lives. They don't say, oh these kids are gang members and I
> won't work with them because they are inappropriate. We're not going to
> let you do props because you use or wear gang symbols...
>=20
> They use ALL of that as the material of the arts and we need to find a wa=
y
> to bring their material into the content of our art classes.
>=20
> Regards,
> Teresa Tipton
>=20
>=20
> On Tue, 3 Jun 1997, Stenger - Judith DiSalvo wrote:
>=20
> > Fred, Bob, and other friends,
> > I suspect that we agree on more than we disagree--maybe our
> > differences are mostly semantic. Perhaps we teach differing age groups,
> > and thus have differing points of focus. Somehow, when we re worried
> > about
> > children still being alive tomorrow, it doesn't make a lot of sense to
> > countenance pictures or symbols reflecting violence and drugs. I'm not
> > accusing anyone of having said that's ok, I'm just saying that adults h=
ave
> > the responsibility to set the limits--kids' job is to try to stretch th=
em.
> > We have to recognize that adolescents will always need something to
> > struggle against. We must draw the parameters.
> > Judy=20
> >=20
> > On Mon, 2 Jun 1997 EVasso wrote:
> >=20
> > > Bob,
> > >=20
> > > Thank you for your response:
> > >=20
> > > <<Perhaps democracy was not the best choice of words for the natural =
outcome
> > > of effective human relations which your decribed when you said, "lear=
ning is
> > > about teachers and students constructing and reconstructing knowledge
> > > together." This is a given and speaks of basic respect for each othe=
r in
> > > the learning process.. You speak of a process which can be found dist=
ributed
> > > through the gamet of learning environments. It has little to do with
> > > democracy.>>
> > >=20
> > > I don't agree. I do not believe that the notion of an (art) curriculu=
m which
> > > arises from students and teachers constructing and reconstructing kno=
wledge
> > > together is either "natural" or "can be found distributed..."
> > >=20
> > > You yourself described a different kind of classroom: "..but please d=
on't
> > > suggest," you said, "that the quality of art instruction and
> > > the educational expectations that I have for each of my students shou=
ld be
> > > eroded or compromised..."=20
> > >=20
> > > I compromise over educational expectations all the time. I make comp=
romises
> > > with administration, with students who come from abusive homes, stude=
nts who
> > > struggle with concepts or skills, with parents who make unfair demand=
s or who
> > > aren't demanding enough, who are too protective of their kids or not
> > > protective enough. I make compromises over where I was planning to ta=
ke the
> > > class,conceptually, because a child came up with something else, mayb=
e a
> > > place more interesting to them, or to me. I negotiate, give a little,=
demand
> > > a little, work, push, retreat and sometimes advance. And, dictionary
> > > definitions not withstanding, that is a part of democracy. Teacher as
> > > gatekeeper is not. =20
> > >=20
> > > And with henry's story in mind, I'll just keep on chewing on this bon=
e. I
> > > ain't pissin' on it.
> > >=20
> > > -Fred
> > > Chicago
> > >=20
> > >=20
> > >=20
> >=20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: cdswood
> Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 19:17:38 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: Re: 4x4 block
>=20
> Thanks for the info! One question: on a 4x4 block, I know the year long =
classes become semester classes. Do the semester classes then become 9 wee=
k classes? No one seems to know the answer to this one.
>=20
> Thanks!
> cdswood
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Ronald F Bennett <rbennett>
> Date: Wed, 04 Jun 1997 22:38:21 -0400
> Subject: integration of the arts
>=20
> Dear Artsednetters,
>=20
> I have been asked to do a 20 minute presentation/speech on integration
> of the arts. Any suggestions from you all out there. What should be
> included. I would like to make 3 or 4 main points and elaborate on each
> of them and then conclude with some type pf closure. I know 20 minutes
> is not long. Also, the presentation must be multi-media. Put you
> thinking caps on and send me your best ideas.
>=20
> Also, I am looking for someone from Lousiana or anyone who was at NAEA
> in New Orleans who can help me with some information about a display I
> saw. The display was artwork and lesson plans. The lesson I am
> interested in was on Screen Masks. What I need to know is the
> historical information on screen masks and how these people dressed in
> costume went from farm to farm gathering the ingredients for their
> celebration dinner that they cooked as a whole community on the last
> night before lent. Can anyone help me. =20
>=20
> Thanks,
> Peggy Bennett
> Moncks Corner, SC
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Chaney <lchaney>
> Date: Wed, 04 Jun 1997 23:32:16 -0500
> Subject: graphic arts
>=20
> I just got a new job offer to teach art to grades 9-12. (I currently
> teach in a small K-12 school). A class which will be offered in the
> fall will be computer art graphics. The class will have about 20
> students with 10 computers.
>=20
> Can anyone please send me information on lesson plans for this class.=20
> Also what do others of you do when half the class is on the computer?=20
> What projects can the other half be doing?????
>=20
>=20
> PLEASE HELP ME!!!
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Date: Thu, 5 Jun 1997 08:10:51 GMT
> Subject: Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
>=20
> Hi Teresa. I just want to tell you how I think your answer is the first o=
ne
> in this discussion that I agree fully with. Banning things is not going t=
o
> make them go away. We must cure the cause of the illness. You said:
> >I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual.> That is
> >what we should try.
> But I like your whole answer. Hope sincerely you don=B4t loose that 5th
> grader. Regards from the far north, Rosa
>=20
> >Disagreements are the fodder of growth; cognitive dissonance is essentia=
l
> >for learning, so why stifle it?
> >
> >This discussion is really important and I think more needs to be said. I
> >am losing a fifth grader who is one of the best artists in school to a
> >gang and I have gone through all the emotions and words and efforts to t=
ry
> >and bring him back by using his art as a lever.
> >
> >I said before that I found something missing and I still feel that in th=
e
> >discussion. It's one thing to remove graffiti and to set limits, rules a=
nd
> >standards of conduct. I see that as our responsibility as adults guiding
> >young people who are still developmentally growing. At the same time, I
> >find some of the posts to be polarized against the use of the symbols
> >because of tagging, missing a wonderful learning opportunity to try and
> >transform both the meaning of the symbol employed and its relevance to i=
ts
> >users.
> >
> >I myself "ban" smiley faces and corner suns with sunglasses because of
> >their overuse. I challenge students to look beyond the cliche and
> >represent what the symbol stands for some other way. If a gang member
> >identifies with the yin yang symbol then my approach would be to have th=
e
> >student in their art show what aspects of the symbol they identify with.
> >Query how the student can represent aspects of themselves some other way=
=2E
> >Get them to look at what the symbol represents; how it's been used
> >culturally; what it means personally and to draw that without using the
> >symbol , if in fact it is banned from class.
> >
> >I want to make the distinction between erasing an image because it is in
> >an inappropriate place or it is used inappropriately and discounting tho=
se
> >who use it or who have identified with it.
> >
> >We only polarize the behavior and the impetus when we ban these things
> >without QUERY, DISCUSSION, CHALLENGE, and most of all, confrontration wi=
th
> >those souls who have identified themselves with something that we may no=
t
> >understand.
> >
> >We may find gang behavior distasteful and abhorrent but it has a
> >legitimacy as an expression of disenfranchisement. It exists because of
> >cultural and social issues we have not faced in our society.
> >
> >We cannot make it go away by erasing its symbols. But we neglect our rol=
e
> >as educators if all we do is erase and ban images without trying to delv=
e
> >into their more significant meansings and aspects. We have an opportunit=
y
> >to reach out to those kids who use the symbols and help them make real
> >linkages between the meaning of the symbols and their lives beyond
> >tagging. After all, each of is "tagging" everyday - my car, my home, my
> >wallet, my purse, my money, my space....Tagging is a part of repitilian
> >brain behavior and let's be honest folks - all of us have repitilian par=
ts
> >to our brains.
> >
> >I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual. I think =
of
> >the Living Stage Theatre company in D.C. that goes into the inner city
> >with Shakespeare and teaches gang members how to act by using the materi=
al
> >from their lives. They don't say, oh these kids are gang members and I
> >won't work with them because they are inappropriate. We're not going to
> >let you do props because you use or wear gang symbols...
> >
> >They use ALL of that as the material of the arts and we need to find a w=
ay
> >to bring their material into the content of our art classes.
> >
> >Regards,
> >Teresa Tipton
> >
> >
> >On Tue, 3 Jun 1997, Stenger - Judith DiSalvo wrote:
> >
> >> Fred, Bob, and other friends,
> >> I suspect that we agree on more than we disagree--maybe our
> >> differences are mostly semantic. Perhaps we teach differing age groups=
,
> >> and thus have differing points of focus. Somehow, when we re worried
> >> about
> >> children still being alive tomorrow, it doesn't make a lot of sense to
> >> countenance pictures or symbols reflecting violence and drugs. I'm no=
t
> >> accusing anyone of having said that's ok, I'm just saying that adults =
have
> >> the responsibility to set the limits--kids' job is to try to stretch t=
hem.
> >> We have to recognize that adolescents will always need something to
> >> struggle against. We must draw the parameters.
> >> Judy
> >>
> >> On Mon, 2 Jun 1997 EVasso wrote:
> >>
> >> > Bob,
> >> >
> >> > Thank you for your response:
> >> >
> >> > <<Perhaps democracy was not the best choice of words for the natural
> >>outcome
> >> > of effective human relations which your decribed when you said,
> >>"learning is
> >> > about teachers and students constructing and reconstructing knowledg=
e
> >> > together." This is a given and speaks of basic respect for each oth=
er in
> >> > the learning process.. You speak of a process which can be found
> >>distributed
> >> > through the gamet of learning environments. It has little to do wit=
h
> >> > democracy.>>
> >> >
> >> > I don't agree. I do not believe that the notion of an (art) curricul=
um
> >>which
> >> > arises from students and teachers constructing and reconstructing kn=
owledge
> >> > together is either "natural" or "can be found distributed..."
> >> >
> >> > You yourself described a different kind of classroom: "..but please =
don't
> >> > suggest," you said, "that the quality of art instruction and
> >> > the educational expectations that I have for each of my students sho=
uld be
> >> > eroded or compromised..."
> >> >
> >> > I compromise over educational expectations all the time. I make
> >>compromises
> >> > with administration, with students who come from abusive homes,
> >>students who
> >> > struggle with concepts or skills, with parents who make unfair deman=
ds
> >>or who
> >> > aren't demanding enough, who are too protective of their kids or not
> >> > protective enough. I make compromises over where I was planning to t=
ake the
> >> > class,conceptually, because a child came up with something else, may=
be a
> >> > place more interesting to them, or to me. I negotiate, give a little=
,
> >>demand
> >> > a little, work, push, retreat and sometimes advance. And, dictionary
> >> > definitions not withstanding, that is a part of democracy. Teacher a=
s
> >> > gatekeeper is not.
> >> >
> >> > And with henry's story in mind, I'll just keep on chewing on this bo=
ne. I
> >> > ain't pissin' on it.
> >> >
> >> > -Fred
> >> > Chicago
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
>=20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: JANN M GALLAGHER <JMG.us>
> Date: Thu, 5 Jun 1997 04:50:05 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: [none]
>=20
> Please unsubscribe for the summer
> - ---------------------
> Jann M Gallagher
> Euclid City Schools
> jmg.us
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Robert Alexander Fromme <rfromme>
> Date: Tue, 03 Jun 1997 01:34:47 -0600
> Subject: Re: Clay Head Sculptures
>=20
> At 10:29 PM 6/2/97 -0500, Kathleen McCrea wrote:
> >Help!
>=20
> The color of the heads in the=20
> >Alpine kiln was sort of gold, even brownish; the color of the fired clay=
=20
> >heads in the electric kiln was basically white.
> >=09
>=20
> Yes, it sounds as if the heads were probably near th firebox in the Alpin=
e.
> Any gas kiln is much hotter near the firebox in the early stage of the fi=
re.
> The cones or pyrometer may have been reading a correct temperature but th=
e
> temp near the flames probably raced out of control soon after the kiln wa=
s
> turned on. The explosions happened in the earliest stages, the color
> developed later, from the reduction of the iron in the clay. Iron in an
> oxidation atmosphere is stable but when subjected to an environment of
> carbon monoxide, it is forced to revert to (reduced) to its metalic state=
=2E
> In that state, it becomes a more active flux and numerous chemical reacti=
ons
> are set into motion by the iron in the clay. However none of these involv=
e
> exploding clay heads.=20
>=20
>=20
> On the construction of the clay heads, if you must make them thicker then
> 3/4" to 1" in wall depth, the old trick is to take a needle tool or thin
> wire such as a paper clip and perferate the thick wall with tiney holes,
> then smooth over the surface of the form. This way, little paths have be=
en
> creted in the thickness to let the moisture move out of the deeper areas =
of
> the clay wall in the earlier stages of the preheat and fire.
>=20
> Better luck next time. Perhaps you need to take direct responsibility fo=
r
> the firing of your student's work. That way, you will be more cautious w=
hen
> you load the thicker greenware in the center of the kiln away from the
> fireboxes and in the early stages of preheat. Perhaps you will want to r=
un
> the piolet lights only, a hair dryer, or small portable tourch into the
> fireports for 4 to 6 hours before turning on the larger gas burners.
>=20
> Bob
>=20
> =20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #303
> *******************************
>=20
> To post to the ArtsEdNet Talk Listserve, send e-mail to:
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> * To Unsubscribe from the listserve, send e-mail to:
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>=20