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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #303

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Schectman - Riselle (riselles)
Thu, 5 Jun 1997 20:31:14 -0400 (EDT)


Perhaps the person who taught the children to make clay sculpture heads
did not allow enough time for the clay to dry fully. I generally allow a
week minimum. Riselle Schectman

On Thu, 5 Jun 1997 owner-artsednet-digest wrote:

>=20
> artsednet-digest Thursday, 5 June 1997 Volume 02 : Number=
303
>=20
> This edition includes:
> Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
> Re: 4x4 block
> integration o
f the arts
> graphic arts
> Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
> [none]
> Re: Clay Head Sculptures
>=20
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>=20
> From: Teresa Tipton <ttipton.wa.us>
> Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 18:50:19 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
>=20
> Disagreements are the fodder of growth; cognitive dissonance is essential
> for learning, so why stifle it?
>=20
> This discussion is really important and I think more needs to be said. I
> am losing a fifth grader who is one of the best artists in school to a
> gang and I have gone through all the emotions and words and efforts to tr=
y
> and bring him back by using his art as a lever.
>=20
> I said before that I found something missing and I still feel that in the
> discussion. It's one thing to remove graffiti and to set limits, rules an=
d
> standards of conduct. I see that as our responsibility as adults guiding
> young people who are still developmentally growing. At the same time, I
> find some of the posts to be polarized against the use of the symbols
> because of tagging, missing a wonderful learning opportunity to try and
> transform both the meaning of the symbol employed and its relevance to it=
s
> users.
>=20
> I myself "ban" smiley faces and corner suns with sunglasses because of
> their overuse. I challenge students to look beyond the cliche and
> represent what the symbol stands for some other way. If a gang member
> identifies with the yin yang symbol then my approach would be to have the
> student in their art show what aspects of the symbol they identify with.
> Query how the student can represent aspects of themselves some other way.
> Get them to look at what the symbol represents; how it's been used
> culturally; what it means personally and to draw that without using the
> symbol , if in fact it is banned from class.
>=20
> I want to make the distinction between erasing an image because it is in
> an inappropriate place or it is used inappropriately and discounting thos=
e
> who use it or who have identified with it.=20
>=20
> We only polarize the behavior and the impetus when we ban these things
> without QUERY, DISCUSSION, CHALLENGE, and most of all, confrontration wit=
h
> those souls who have identified themselves with something that we may not
> understand.
>=20
> We may find gang behavior distasteful and abhorrent but it has a
> legitimacy as an expression of disenfranchisement. It exists because of
> cultural and social issues we have not faced in our society.
>=20
> We cannot make it go away by erasing its symbols. But we neglect our role
> as educators if all we do is erase and ban images without trying to delve
> into their more significant meansings and aspects. We have an opportunity
> to reach out to those kids who use the symbols and help them make real
> linkages between the meaning of the symbols and their lives beyond
> tagging. After all, each of is "tagging" everyday - my car, my home, my
> wallet, my purse, my money, my space....Tagging is a part of repitilian
> brain behavior and let's be honest folks - all of us have repitilian part=
s
> to our brains.
>=20
> I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual. I think o=
f
> the Living Stage Theatre company in D.C. that goes into the inner city
> with Shakespeare and teaches gang members how to act by using the materia=
l
> from their lives. They don't say, oh these kids are gang members and I
> won't work with them because they are inappropriate. We're not going to
> let you do props because you use or wear gang symbols...
>=20
> They use ALL of that as the material of the arts and we need to find a wa=
y
> to bring their material into the content of our art classes.
>=20
> Regards,
> Teresa Tipton
>=20
>=20
> On Tue, 3 Jun 1997, Stenger - Judith DiSalvo wrote:
>=20
> > Fred, Bob, and other friends,
> > I suspect that we agree on more than we disagree--maybe our
> > differences are mostly semantic. Perhaps we teach differing age groups,
> > and thus have differing points of focus. Somehow, when we re worried
> > about
> > children still being alive tomorrow, it doesn't make a lot of sense to
> > countenance pictures or symbols reflecting violence and drugs. I'm not
> > accusing anyone of having said that's ok, I'm just saying that adults h=
ave
> > the responsibility to set the limits--kids' job is to try to stretch th=
em.
> > We have to recognize that adolescents will always need something to
> > struggle against. We must draw the parameters.
> > Judy=20
> >=20
> > On Mon, 2 Jun 1997 EVasso wrote:
> >=20
> > > Bob,
> > >=20
> > > Thank you for your response:
> > >=20
> > > <<Perhaps democracy was not the best choice of words for the natural =
outcome
> > > of effective human relations which your decribed when you said, "lear=
ning is
> > > about teachers and students constructing and reconstructing knowledge
> > > together." This is a given and speaks of basic respect for each othe=
r in
> > > the learning process.. You speak of a process which can be found dist=
ributed
> > > through the gamet of learning environments. It has little to do with
> > > democracy.>>
> > >=20
> > > I don't agree. I do not believe that the notion of an (art) curriculu=
m which
> > > arises from students and teachers constructing and reconstructing kno=
wledge
> > > together is either "natural" or "can be found distributed..."
> > >=20
> > > You yourself described a different kind of classroom: "..but please d=
on't
> > > suggest," you said, "that the quality of art instruction and
> > > the educational expectations that I have for each of my students shou=
ld be
> > > eroded or compromised..."=20
> > >=20
> > > I compromise over educational expectations all the time. I make comp=
romises
> > > with administration, with students who come from abusive homes, stude=
nts who
> > > struggle with concepts or skills, with parents who make unfair demand=
s or who
> > > aren't demanding enough, who are too protective of their kids or not
> > > protective enough. I make compromises over where I was planning to ta=
ke the
> > > class,conceptually, because a child came up with something else, mayb=
e a
> > > place more interesting to them, or to me. I negotiate, give a little,=
demand
> > > a little, work, push, retreat and sometimes advance. And, dictionary
> > > definitions not withstanding, that is a part of democracy. Teacher as
> > > gatekeeper is not. =20
> > >=20
> > > And with henry's story in mind, I'll just keep on chewing on this bon=
e. I
> > > ain't pissin' on it.
> > >=20
> > > -Fred
> > > Chicago
> > >=20
> > >=20
> > >=20
> >=20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: cdswood
> Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 19:17:38 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: Re: 4x4 block
>=20
> Thanks for the info! One question: on a 4x4 block, I know the year long =
classes become semester classes. Do the semester classes then become 9 wee=
k classes? No one seems to know the answer to this one.
>=20
> Thanks!
> cdswood
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Ronald F Bennett <rbennett>
> Date: Wed, 04 Jun 1997 22:38:21 -0400
> Subject: integration of the arts
>=20
> Dear Artsednetters,
>=20
> I have been asked to do a 20 minute presentation/speech on integration
> of the arts. Any suggestions from you all out there. What should be
> included. I would like to make 3 or 4 main points and elaborate on each
> of them and then conclude with some type pf closure. I know 20 minutes
> is not long. Also, the presentation must be multi-media. Put you
> thinking caps on and send me your best ideas.
>=20
> Also, I am looking for someone from Lousiana or anyone who was at NAEA
> in New Orleans who can help me with some information about a display I
> saw. The display was artwork and lesson plans. The lesson I am
> interested in was on Screen Masks. What I need to know is the
> historical information on screen masks and how these people dressed in
> costume went from farm to farm gathering the ingredients for their
> celebration dinner that they cooked as a whole community on the last
> night before lent. Can anyone help me. =20
>=20
> Thanks,
> Peggy Bennett
> Moncks Corner, SC
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Chaney <lchaney>
> Date: Wed, 04 Jun 1997 23:32:16 -0500
> Subject: graphic arts
>=20
> I just got a new job offer to teach art to grades 9-12. (I currently
> teach in a small K-12 school). A class which will be offered in the
> fall will be computer art graphics. The class will have about 20
> students with 10 computers.
>=20
> Can anyone please send me information on lesson plans for this class.=20
> Also what do others of you do when half the class is on the computer?=20
> What projects can the other half be doing?????
>=20
>=20
> PLEASE HELP ME!!!
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Date: Thu, 5 Jun 1997 08:10:51 GMT
> Subject: Re: Democracy, art, schools and gangs
>=20
> Hi Teresa. I just want to tell you how I think your answer is the first o=
ne
> in this discussion that I agree fully with. Banning things is not going t=
o
> make them go away. We must cure the cause of the illness. You said:
> >I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual.> That is
> >what we should try.
> But I like your whole answer. Hope sincerely you don=B4t loose that 5th
> grader. Regards from the far north, Rosa
>=20
> >Disagreements are the fodder of growth; cognitive dissonance is essentia=
l
> >for learning, so why stifle it?
> >
> >This discussion is really important and I think more needs to be said. I
> >am losing a fifth grader who is one of the best artists in school to a
> >gang and I have gone through all the emotions and words and efforts to t=
ry
> >and bring him back by using his art as a lever.
> >
> >I said before that I found something missing and I still feel that in th=
e
> >discussion. It's one thing to remove graffiti and to set limits, rules a=
nd
> >standards of conduct. I see that as our responsibility as adults guiding
> >young people who are still developmentally growing. At the same time, I
> >find some of the posts to be polarized against the use of the symbols
> >because of tagging, missing a wonderful learning opportunity to try and
> >transform both the meaning of the symbol employed and its relevance to i=
ts
> >users.
> >
> >I myself "ban" smiley faces and corner suns with sunglasses because of
> >their overuse. I challenge students to look beyond the cliche and
> >represent what the symbol stands for some other way. If a gang member
> >identifies with the yin yang symbol then my approach would be to have th=
e
> >student in their art show what aspects of the symbol they identify with.
> >Query how the student can represent aspects of themselves some other way=
=2E
> >Get them to look at what the symbol represents; how it's been used
> >culturally; what it means personally and to draw that without using the
> >symbol , if in fact it is banned from class.
> >
> >I want to make the distinction between erasing an image because it is in
> >an inappropriate place or it is used inappropriately and discounting tho=
se
> >who use it or who have identified with it.
> >
> >We only polarize the behavior and the impetus when we ban these things
> >without QUERY, DISCUSSION, CHALLENGE, and most of all, confrontration wi=
th
> >those souls who have identified themselves with something that we may no=
t
> >understand.
> >
> >We may find gang behavior distasteful and abhorrent but it has a
> >legitimacy as an expression of disenfranchisement. It exists because of
> >cultural and social issues we have not faced in our society.
> >
> >We cannot make it go away by erasing its symbols. But we neglect our rol=
e
> >as educators if all we do is erase and ban images without trying to delv=
e
> >into their more significant meansings and aspects. We have an opportunit=
y
> >to reach out to those kids who use the symbols and help them make real
> >linkages between the meaning of the symbols and their lives beyond
> >tagging. After all, each of is "tagging" everyday - my car, my home, my
> >wallet, my purse, my money, my space....Tagging is a part of repitilian
> >brain behavior and let's be honest folks - all of us have repitilian par=
ts
> >to our brains.
> >
> >I believe in the power of the arts to transform the individual. I think =
of
> >the Living Stage Theatre company in D.C. that goes into the inner city
> >with Shakespeare and teaches gang members how to act by using the materi=
al
> >from their lives. They don't say, oh these kids are gang members and I
> >won't work with them because they are inappropriate. We're not going to
> >let you do props because you use or wear gang symbols...
> >
> >They use ALL of that as the material of the arts and we need to find a w=
ay
> >to bring their material into the content of our art classes.
> >
> >Regards,
> >Teresa Tipton
> >
> >
> >On Tue, 3 Jun 1997, Stenger - Judith DiSalvo wrote:
> >
> >> Fred, Bob, and other friends,
> >> I suspect that we agree on more than we disagree--maybe our
> >> differences are mostly semantic. Perhaps we teach differing age groups=
,
> >> and thus have differing points of focus. Somehow, when we re worried
> >> about
> >> children still being alive tomorrow, it doesn't make a lot of sense to
> >> countenance pictures or symbols reflecting violence and drugs. I'm no=
t
> >> accusing anyone of having said that's ok, I'm just saying that adults =
have
> >> the responsibility to set the limits--kids' job is to try to stretch t=
hem.
> >> We have to recognize that adolescents will always need something to
> >> struggle against. We must draw the parameters.
> >> Judy
> >>
> >> On Mon, 2 Jun 1997 EVasso wrote:
> >>
> >> > Bob,
> >> >
> >> > Thank you for your response:
> >> >
> >> > <<Perhaps democracy was not the best choice of words for the natural
> >>outcome
> >> > of effective human relations which your decribed when you said,
> >>"learning is
> >> > about teachers and students constructing and reconstructing knowledg=
e
> >> > together." This is a given and speaks of basic respect for each oth=
er in
> >> > the learning process.. You speak of a process which can be found
> >>distributed
> >> > through the gamet of learning environments. It has little to do wit=
h
> >> > democracy.>>
> >> >
> >> > I don't agree. I do not believe that the notion of an (art) curricul=
um
> >>which
> >> > arises from students and teachers constructing and reconstructing kn=
owledge
> >> > together is either "natural" or "can be found distributed..."
> >> >
> >> > You yourself described a different kind of classroom: "..but please =
don't
> >> > suggest," you said, "that the quality of art instruction and
> >> > the educational expectations that I have for each of my students sho=
uld be
> >> > eroded or compromised..."
> >> >
> >> > I compromise over educational expectations all the time. I make
> >>compromises
> >> > with administration, with students who come from abusive homes,
> >>students who
> >> > struggle with concepts or skills, with parents who make unfair deman=
ds
> >>or who
> >> > aren't demanding enough, who are too protective of their kids or not
> >> > protective enough. I make compromises over where I was planning to t=
ake the
> >> > class,conceptually, because a child came up with something else, may=
be a
> >> > place more interesting to them, or to me. I negotiate, give a little=
,
> >>demand
> >> > a little, work, push, retreat and sometimes advance. And, dictionary
> >> > definitions not withstanding, that is a part of democracy. Teacher a=
s
> >> > gatekeeper is not.
> >> >
> >> > And with henry's story in mind, I'll just keep on chewing on this bo=
ne. I
> >> > ain't pissin' on it.
> >> >
> >> > -Fred
> >> > Chicago
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
>=20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: JANN M GALLAGHER <JMG.us>
> Date: Thu, 5 Jun 1997 04:50:05 -0700 (PDT)
> Subject: [none]
>=20
> Please unsubscribe for the summer
> - ---------------------
> Jann M Gallagher
> Euclid City Schools
> jmg.us
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> From: Robert Alexander Fromme <rfromme>
> Date: Tue, 03 Jun 1997 01:34:47 -0600
> Subject: Re: Clay Head Sculptures
>=20
> At 10:29 PM 6/2/97 -0500, Kathleen McCrea wrote:
> >Help!
>=20
> The color of the heads in the=20
> >Alpine kiln was sort of gold, even brownish; the color of the fired clay=
=20
> >heads in the electric kiln was basically white.
> >=09
>=20
> Yes, it sounds as if the heads were probably near th firebox in the Alpin=
e.
> Any gas kiln is much hotter near the firebox in the early stage of the fi=
re.
> The cones or pyrometer may have been reading a correct temperature but th=
e
> temp near the flames probably raced out of control soon after the kiln wa=
s
> turned on. The explosions happened in the earliest stages, the color
> developed later, from the reduction of the iron in the clay. Iron in an
> oxidation atmosphere is stable but when subjected to an environment of
> carbon monoxide, it is forced to revert to (reduced) to its metalic state=
=2E
> In that state, it becomes a more active flux and numerous chemical reacti=
ons
> are set into motion by the iron in the clay. However none of these involv=
e
> exploding clay heads.=20
>=20
>=20
> On the construction of the clay heads, if you must make them thicker then
> 3/4" to 1" in wall depth, the old trick is to take a needle tool or thin
> wire such as a paper clip and perferate the thick wall with tiney holes,
> then smooth over the surface of the form. This way, little paths have be=
en
> creted in the thickness to let the moisture move out of the deeper areas =
of
> the clay wall in the earlier stages of the preheat and fire.
>=20
> Better luck next time. Perhaps you need to take direct responsibility fo=
r
> the firing of your student's work. That way, you will be more cautious w=
hen
> you load the thicker greenware in the center of the kiln away from the
> fireboxes and in the early stages of preheat. Perhaps you will want to r=
un
> the piolet lights only, a hair dryer, or small portable tourch into the
> fireports for 4 to 6 hours before turning on the larger gas burners.
>=20
> Bob
>=20
> =20
>=20
>=20
> ------------------------------
>=20
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #303
> *******************************
>=20
> To post to the ArtsEdNet Talk Listserve, send e-mail to:
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> * To Unsubscribe from the listserve, send e-mail to:
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> * ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/
>=20