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[teacherartexchange] World AIDS Day Discussion Guide

---------

From: Lars Hasselblad Torres (lars_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Jun 27 2007 - 04:32:34 PDT


Dear Colleagues,

I wanted to share with you a draft discussion guide that I have put
together in advance of World AIDS Day 2007. I hope it can be a
valuable classroom and youth group catalyst for engaging
conversations around various aspects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. All of
the tile images used in the "discussion cards" have been created by
young people around the world in a range of settings. Many of the
contributors are ActALIVE members, and I'd be particularly interested
to hear from you what you think about the questions and resources
associated with each tile.

You can download the guide here:
http://www.mixedmedia.us/peacetiles_wad2007_guide.pdf

Thanks so much, and I look forward to getting this patched up for a
Fall release. A huge congratulations to all the young people who
created such evocative, insightful images. I hope this guide honors
their contribution to the global effort to reduce the spread and
effects of AIDS.

lars

----
Lars Hasselblad Torres
www.mixedmedia.us + www.peacetiles.net
On Jun 27, 2007, at 3:01 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group  
digest wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, June 26, 2007.
>
> 1. Artist Research
> 2. RE: Artist Research
> 3. Re: Artist Research
> 4. Re: Artist Research
> 5. RE: Artist Research
> 6. Re: Artist Research-photography
> 7. RE: Artist Research
> 8. Re: [SPAM] Artist Research
> 9. Re: [SPAM] Artist Research:Ironic
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Artist Research
> From: Susan Brown <chssue@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 08:04:35 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> After messaging a student and asking, "who are your
> favorite photographers", I received a the following
> responce: "Only photographer I know by name is Ansel
> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temtation is to
> great to coppy them. This way I think I will develope
> my own unique style."
>
> It's a statement I have heard many times in many
> different ways. When I respond to this student, I'd
> like to have an intelligent justification for the
> importance of artist research. I was curious to know
> how other teachers responded to similar statements
> made by students.
>
> Thanks,
> Susan Brown
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________ 
> ______________
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Artist Research
> From: "Maggie Tucker" <watercolorwiz@bellsouth.net>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 10:48:59 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Justifications:
> 	#1.  In developing style, it is important to consider options.   
> Analyzing
> other artists' styles gives artists opportunity to consider  
> options.  For
> example, while I admire Andrew Wyeth's narrative approach to  
> landscapes, his
> work sometimes feels too "tight" for me.  When I feel my own work  
> being so
> constricted, I refresh my artistic eye by looking at Winslow Homer and
> Edward Hopper. These artists contribute to my artistic vision, but  
> I don't
> ape them.
> 	#2.  In western art history, artists develop unique styles by  
> responding to
> other artists.  One example is Picaaso and Braque, as they  
> responded to work
> by Cezanne in developing analytic cubism.  Paying attention to what is
> happening in the art world today and the past helps artists develop  
> style by
> engaging in a "conversation" with other artists and viewers through  
> your
> work.
> 	#3.  While developing individuality, it is important not to "re- 
> invent" the
> wheel.  For example, my sense of depicting real space and  
> proportion is
> definitely flavored by both Brunelesschi (linear perspective) and
> Michelangelo.  I did not need to re-discover these basic tenents in  
> order to
> use them.  Disregarding others works may mean more work!!
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Susan Brown [mailto:chssue@yahoo.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, June 26, 2007 10:05 AM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Artist Research
>
>
> After messaging a student and asking, "who are your
> favorite photographers", I received a the following
> responce: "Only photographer I know by name is Ansel
> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temtation is to
> great to coppy them. This way I think I will develope
> my own unique style."
>
> It's a statement I have heard many times in many
> different ways. When I respond to this student, I'd
> like to have an intelligent justification for the
> importance of artist research. I was curious to know
> how other teachers responded to similar statements
> made by students.
>
> Thanks,
> Susan Brown
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________ 
> ______
> ________
> Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
> http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Artist Research
> From: Mikel Lee <mikellee31@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 10:33:04 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> How will he know if he is unique unless he knows what
> is out there?That is like not reading a book if you
> are a writer because you want to write your own unique
> story! He is unique by design. Saying the temptation
> is too great to copy them sounds like an attempt to
> sound intelligent while giving lame excuses not to
> become educated in his field. Every professional in
> every field should know the history of their
> profession. It should be inspiring and will give
> depth, insight, meaning, and in times of slow
> motivation a place to go to refuel and seek help.
>
> --- Susan Brown <chssue@.com> wrote:
>
>> I received a the following
>> responce: "Only photographer I know by name is Ansel
>> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temtation is
>> to
>> great to coppy them. This way I think I will
>> develope
>> my own unique style."
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________ 
> ______________
> Never miss an email again!
> Yahoo! Toolbar alerts you the instant new Mail arrives.
> http://tools.search.yahoo.com/toolbar/features/mail/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Artist Research
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 13:34:24 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Hi Susan,
>
> You student has a valid point... But research is important.
>
> One way to get your students exited about research is to first have
> them take a number of photographs. Look at the photographs together
> and see what photographers come to mind.
> This requires you to have a lot of knowledge about photographers  
> yourself.
> Tell the students they share a similar view as "so and so" then have
> them research that particular photographer. There may be several
> photographers that come to mind. In that case, the student can choose
> which one to research. Part of the research will be to find the
> photographer's influences - where they got their ideas. Maybe they
> will discover on their own that photographers are indeed inspired by
> other photographers?
>
> Apply the same idea with any medium.... have the student create art
> first - then find the art history connection and do the research. Look
> at artists who were inspired by the same subject matter.... or
> exhibited a similar style...... or......
>
> Judy Decker
>
> On 6/26/07, Susan Brown wrote:
>> After messaging a student and asking, "who are your
>> favorite photographers", I received a the following
>> response: "Only photographer I know by name is Ansel
>> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temptation is too
>> great to copy them. This way I think I will develop
>> my own unique style."
>>
>> It's a statement I have heard many times in many
>> different ways. When I respond to this student, I'd
>> like to have an intelligent justification for the
>> importance of artist research. I was curious to know
>> how other teachers responded to similar statements
>> made by students.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Susan Brown
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Artist Research
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 11:11:57 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> This is interesting. I am struck first by the lack of
> curiosity - if you are interested in photography, how
> can you not want to see as many good photographs as
> you can? How can you decide what a good photograph is?
>
>
> And then I am struck by the arrogance (perhaps too
> strong a word) - as IF you could copy Ansel Adams'
> style! Right - run along and "do" a Weston today.
>
> It reminds me of the opening of a commercially very
> very successful "self taught" artist - very proud of
> being "self taught". One of her paintings was of a
> Mexican-looking woman holding a large bunch of calla
> lilies. Someone at the opening (not me, I just thought
> it real loud) mentioned it reminded them of Diego
> Rivera. She said "I don't know who that is" and walked
> away in a huff. It just made me sad.
>
> Betty C Bowen
> printmaker, painter
> art educator
> Cushing Oklahoma
> bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net
> http://www.bettybowenart.com
> http://bettycbowen.blogspot.com/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Artist Research-photography
> From: trish ackerman <dacke8175@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 11:37:04 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> During my photography unit I teach about 6 or 7
> different photographers, Adams, Stieichen, Stiglitz,
> lange, Cartier-Bresson. I use a group method where I
> divide the students. Each group is assigned one
> photographer. I have a large photography book(from the
> library, I paperclip inappropriate photos together) of
> each artist and a facts sheet about their life. They
> have to answer specific questions about their
> photographer and pick 2 favorite photos to share with
> the class. Questions such as influences, where born,
> went to college, type of genre, and names of two key
> photos. Then each group presents to the class and the
> other students have to fill out the grid for each
> photographer. I point out what makes the photo art-
> elements principles of design, etc.  If you want the
> worksheet I use I can scan it to you.
> Trish
>
>
> Trish Ackerman
> Core Knowledge Charter School
> Middle School Art,Parker, Colorado
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________________________ 
> ______________
> Don't pick lemons.
> See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.
> http://autos.yahoo.com/new_cars.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Artist Research
> From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 18:11:09 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> I think that the student's bravado hides his lack of knowledge of  
> famous
> photographers. What I usually do with my advanced photo students is  
> assign
> "big ideas" for them to photograph and then introduce them to  
> photographers
> that also tackled the same ideas. After exposing them to different
> photographers, THEN I think it is appropriate to ask the question  
> "who is
> your favorite" and then have them do research on that photographer.  
> Right
> now, I think only my AP Art History students would be able to name  
> famous
> photographers, and most of those students are not going on to art  
> school.
> They can also identify "big ideas" in artwork.
>
> San D
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: [SPAM] Artist Research
> From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 20:50:22 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
>
> On Jun 26, 2007, at 11:04 AM, Susan Brown wrote:
>
>> After messaging a student and asking, "who are your
>> favorite photographers", I received a the following
>> responce: "Only photographer I know by name is Ansel
>> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temtation is to
>> great to coppy them. This way I think I will develope
>> my own unique style."
>>
>> It's a statement I have heard many times in many
>> different ways. When I respond to this student, I'd
>> like to have an intelligent justification for the
>> importance of artist research. I was curious to know
>> how other teachers responded to similar statements
>> made by students.
>>
>
> I think, in photo, more than any other art class I teach, the
> opportunity to learn from other artists exists--- far more easily ....
> I find in photo, far more than in the fine arts courses, kids will
> look and look and ponder and ask questions about the avenues
> photographers have taken for their expressions.
>
> First, you have to provide the resources.    I have a huge print
> library, I have all the best magazines, I have web sources and I have
> a good background on the those photographers who have made statements
> and inroads. Ansel Adams is only one thing------ technique.
> Photo history is the history I love most to teach because it ties
> into so much other relevant stuff.
>
> You have to give the "what-fors" in any area of art you teach.    ---
> "Why did this artist respond in this fashion?" what were the
> circumstances? what was the context for the response?
>
> I guess, I think, what we lack in art ed is teaching is about the
> context of the times and why artists that made a difference ..what
> was that that difference? why did the artist make a difference?
> Photo history is soooo rich in observation. .. and what is more
> important to the photographer or any artist, than observation? I tell
> my students that there is absolutely nothing wrong with copying a a
> photographer's style or intentions because it is absolutely
> impossible to copy a photograph. In fact, I encourage the mimicry in
> photo, because the result  will be particular to the student, no
> matter how hard they try to imitate.
> Ansel Adams had the grand vistas to document. Our students only have
> little vistas to capture.  Teach about the photographers that found
> the "grand" in the "little" and encourage the sight that photography
> affords.
>
> Artist research is not an option-----it's what made all of us
> artists. Artist research is about history, and decision making, and
> critical thinking and making pertinent judgments and nurturing the
> artistic behavior. It's all about the big questions.
>
> and what I like most about forcing the research, is that moment when
> the kid 's light bulb goes off and says---
> "oh, my... somebody else thought what I think and I can take that and
> make it mine--- my  thinking is valid."
>
> Nothing is new. Things only get re-worked... and what gets more re-
> worked than photo? The whole notion of photography is a limbo. The
> best we can do, is encourage those that want to continue the
> traditions to be very aware of those traditions. Otherwise, all we
> have is unartistic documentation by means of cell phone and you tube,
> or we find a ways and means to  bring "intention" to what gets
> plastered all over the place. God forbid, we don't teach kids about
> careful selection and those who made the way.
> There is so much to be said for student directed learning and self
> direction. But it is still the smart teacher who know the ways and
> means to question and get the self directed to look and make their
> own questions- and cherish what was.
>
> Patty
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: [SPAM] Artist Research:Ironic
> From: Diane Gregory <dianegregory2@verizon.net>
> Date: Tue, 26 Jun 2007 18:07:53 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Hi All,
>
> In this age of appropriation and plagiarism, it is
> ironic that we are complaining about a student not
> wanting to be undully influenced by a famous
> photographer.  Seems like we just got through talking
> about the importance of not working from photographs.
> Just strikes me as ironic.  Maybe we are
> unintentionally sending out mixed, confusing messages.
>  I know I am confused right now.
>
> Cheers
>
> Diane
> --- Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net> wrote:
>
>>
>> On Jun 26, 2007, at 11:04 AM, Susan Brown wrote:
>>
>>> After messaging a student and asking, "who are
>> your
>>> favorite photographers", I received a the
>> following
>>> responce: "Only photographer I know by name is
>> Ansel
>>> Adams. I try not to look at pro's, the temtation
>> is to
>>> great to coppy them. This way I think I will
>> develope
>>> my own unique style."
>>>
>>> It's a statement I have heard many times in many
>>> different ways. When I respond to this student,
>> I'd
>>> like to have an intelligent justification for the
>>> importance of artist research. I was curious to
>> know
>>> how other teachers responded to similar statements
>>> made by students.
>>>
>>
>> I think, in photo, more than any other art class I
>> teach, the
>> opportunity to learn from other artists exists---
>> far more easily ....
>> I find in photo, far more than in the fine arts
>> courses, kids will
>> look and look and ponder and ask questions about the
>> avenues
>> photographers have taken for their expressions.
>>
>> First, you have to provide the resources.    I have
>> a huge print
>> library, I have all the best magazines, I have web
>> sources and I have
>> a good background on the those photographers who
>> have made statements
>> and inroads. Ansel Adams is only one thing------
>> technique.
>> Photo history is the history I love most to teach
>> because it ties
>> into so much other relevant stuff.
>>
>> You have to give the "what-fors" in any area of art
>> you teach.    ---
>> "Why did this artist respond in this fashion?" what
>> were the
>> circumstances? what was the context for the
>> response?
>>
>> I guess, I think, what we lack in art ed is teaching
>> is about the
>> context of the times and why artists that made a
>> difference ..what
>> was that that difference? why did the artist make a
>> difference?
>> Photo history is soooo rich in observation. .. and
>> what is more
>> important to the photographer or any artist, than
>> observation? I tell
>> my students that there is absolutely nothing wrong
>> with copying a a
>> photographer's style or intentions because it is
>> absolutely
>> impossible to copy a photograph. In fact, I
>> encourage the mimicry in
>> photo, because the result  will be particular to the
>> student, no
>> matter how hard they try to imitate.
>> Ansel Adams had the grand vistas to document. Our
>> students only have
>> little vistas to capture.  Teach about the
>> photographers that found
>> the "grand" in the "little" and encourage the sight
>> that photography
>> affords.
>>
>> Artist research is not an option-----it's what made
>> all of us
>> artists. Artist research is about history, and
>> decision making, and
>> critical thinking and making pertinent judgments and
>> nurturing the
>> artistic behavior. It's all about the big questions.
>>
>> and what I like most about forcing the research, is
>> that moment when
>> the kid 's light bulb goes off and says---
>> "oh, my... somebody else thought what I think and I
>> can take that and
>> make it mine--- my  thinking is valid."
>>
>> Nothing is new. Things only get re-worked... and
>> what gets more re-
>> worked than photo? The whole notion of photography
>> is a limbo. The
>> best we can do, is encourage those that want to
>> continue the
>> traditions to be very aware of those traditions.
>> Otherwise, all we
>> have is unartistic documentation by means of cell
>> phone and you tube,
>> or we find a ways and means to  bring "intention" to
>> what gets
>> plastered all over the place. God forbid, we don't
>> teach kids about
>> careful selection and those who made the way.
>> There is so much to be said for student directed
>> learning and self
>> direction. But it is still the smart teacher who
>> know the ways and
>> means to question and get the self directed to look
>> and make their
>> own questions- and cherish what was.
>>
>> Patty
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>>
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> lars@mixedmedia.us
> teacherartexchange-181769P@lists.pub.getty.edu
---
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