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Re: [teacherartexchange] Visual Culture and TAB/Propel

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twoducks_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sat Jun 03 2006 - 10:37:09 PDT


<<-----Original Message-----
From: lwalden
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sat, 3 Jun 2006 9:51:38 -0700
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Visual Culture and TAB/Propel

    Hello...I need to get some good articles on Visual Culture and
TAB/Propel
philosophies of Art Ed to discuss in my grad class.>>

Hi Lee Ann,

TAB and Propel are NOT one and the same, although there are some
connections. A Google search of "Arts Propel" will take you to
http://www.pz.harvard.edu/Research/PROPEL.htm. There is
student-directed work in all the arts in this form of teaching which I
believe is aimed at middle to high school age students.

I am a co founder of the Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership
(TAB) which develops and supports practice for student centered
learning in visual art classrooms. We have many elementary members,
but also some from middle and high school.

Because the use of terms can be confusing, I am including an article
written by Diane Jaquith in 2005:

We recognize that there are many varied ways of offering choice in art
education, and that many art educators do so in varying degrees
depending upon their particular art programs and district requirements.
(We support) teachers who are developing, have developed or plan to
develop an art program with the purpose of providing students maximum
choices in their art making experiences in the classroom. We’ve
noticed that the terms “Choice-based,” “Teaching for Artistic
Behavior,” “TAB,” and “Centers approach” are often interchanged. In
response to a request for clarification of the terms, here are some
definitions that we use in our teaching.

CHOICE-BASED ART EDUCATION regards students as artists and offers them
real choices for responding to their own ideas and interests through
the making of art. This concept supports multiple modes of learning and
teaching for the diverse needs of students. In the learning
environment, resources and opportunities to construct knowledge and
meaning in the process of making art are provided. Choice-Based Art
Education utilizes multiple forms of assessment to support student and
teacher growth.

If you offer your students full choice most of the time, then you are a
choice-based art educator.

THE TEACHING FOR ARTISTIC BEHAVIOR PARTNERSHIP is an organization that
brings together choice-based art programs from around the United
States. The concept emerged over 30 years ago in Massachusetts
classrooms through the need for more authentic art making experiences.
United through Massachusetts College of Art (MCA), teachers working in
isolation discovered others who also held belief in the child as the
artist. With the support of MCA, NAEA and The Education Alliance at
Brown University, the Teaching for Artistic Behavior Partnership (TAB)
was formed in 2001. Since then, TAB has become a visible presence
online, at NAEA conferences, and at regional gatherings.

All choice-based art educators are welcome as members of the Teaching
for Artistic Behavior Partnership. As a member of TAB, you are likely a
choice-based art educator, or friend of choice-based art education.

A CENTERS APPROACH reflects the learning environment, with different
learning centers set up in the classroom. Commonly seen in primary
classrooms, centers offer students a focused learning experience. Most
choice-based art programs offer separate media centers, such as
painting, clay, printmaking, etc. These centers function as mini art
studios, complete with instructional information printed on menus,
resources, materials and tools. Students move independently between
centers, utilizing materials, tools and resources as needed in their
art making.

Centers refer to the learning environment, and are not a methodology.
You cannot be a “centers-based” educator, but you can be a choice-based
educator who provides centers in your classroom. copyright D. Jaquith
2005

Regards and good luck with your coursework! If you would like a list of
our Internet publications, please contact me off list.
kathy douglas, In Massachusetts

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