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Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In Art Assignments

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From: Darren High (darren_high_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Jun 30 2005 - 20:52:02 PDT


Rebirth around Easter is symbolic of the spring coming
after winter. After a long period of "death" when
flowers and plants are dead or covered with snow, they
then awaken in the spring with blooming flowers and
leaves on the trees. Also spring usually involves the
birth of various animals who were hibernating through
the winter months. Christianity and the resurrection
of Christ does tie into that, but the spring and
Easter celebrations of rebirth predate the birth of
Christ by hundreds of years.

--- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Themes of peace are good anytime of year, not just
> at
> Christmas. However, themes of rebirth around easter
> will likely feel a bit marginalizing to your
> non-christian students.
>
>
> --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > The holidays are part of our culture, but art
> > projects
> > depicting seasonal elements associated with
> holidays
> > (Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, etc.) then become
> > essential holiday decorations and are not
> something
> > that would be displayed throughout the year. Most
> > of
> > us view Christmas as an important part of our
> > culture,
> > but I doubt any of us have paintings of Santa
> Claus
> > up
> > year around.
> >
> > You can use those holidays as springboards to art
> > that
> > uses the concepts of celebrations to create
> artwork
> > that would not seem seasonal. For example, a work
> > involving the concept of peace for Christmas, a
> > nightmare/fear for Halloween, love for Valentine's
> > Day, rebirth for Easter, freedom for Black History
> > Month, etc. For St. Patrick's Day you could have
> > them
> > do a monochromatic painting using only green,
> black,
> > and white to depict whatever subject matter they
> > choose.
> >
> >
> >
> > --- "Diane C. Gregory"
> <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Interesting discussion on creativity.
> > >
> > > What about looking at seasonal or holiday
> objects
> > as
> > > artifacts of culture. I do
> > > know that in the past, art educators have
> usually
> > > thought of holiday art as
> > > trivial and trite, without much merit. However,
> > in
> > > more recent times, some
> > > have advocated looking at holidays as examples
> of
> > > tradition, celebration, which
> > > have an important place in the lives of
> children.
> > > Laura Chapman in her book
> > > Approaches to Art in Education advocated looking
> > at
> > > holidays, traditions and
> > > celebrations as a way to look at art and
> culture.
> > > Maybe we have been
> > > overlooking an important opportunity to
> understand
> > > our own culture and the
> > > culture of others. Taking a value pluralistic
> > > stance, might be appropriate
> > > when looking at cultural artifacts. The entire
> > > discussion really centers
> > > around what the purpose of an education in art
> is.
> >
> > > It seems there are
> > > differing assumptions about what that is or what
> > > that entails. It is
> > > fascinating to watch the changes unfold over
> time.
> > >
> > > Diane
> > > --
> > > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> > > Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> > > Studies in Art Education
> > > Texas Woman's University
> > > Denton, TX 76204
> > > dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> > > 940-898-2540
> > >
> > >
> > > Quoting Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>:
> > >
> > > > My problem with creating artwork tightly
> > > associated
> > > > with holidays is that the art then simply
> > becomes
> > > a
> > > > seasonal decoration. Most people do not keep
> > > artwork
> > > > depicting Santa Claus, The Easter Bunny, or
> jack
> > > > o'lanterns on display throughout the year.
> That
> > > stuff
> > > > seems appropriate only a few weeks out of the
> > > year.
> > > >
> > > > I think you could have projects that sort of
> tie
> > > into
> > > > seasonal events, but would also be able to be
> > > > displayed throughout the year. For example,
> > > Easter
> > > > has it's pre-Christian roots in Pagan
> > celebrations
> > > of
> > > > fertility and rebirth symbolized by spring, so
> > an
> > > > assignment involving flowers would seem to fit
> > > nicely
> > > > without seeming too seasonal. For Christmas,
> > they
> > > > could create images of a favorite toys which
> > could
> > > > possibly tie into a pop art lesson. For
> > Halloween
> > > > they could create a picture based on a
> nightmare
> > > or
> > > > something they fear (such as spiders, snakes,
> > > sharks,
> > > > etc.).
> > > >
> > > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > My question would be to ask what value is in
> > > making
> > > > > art-products that have a predestination.
> If
> > a
> > > > > student's input doesn't go beyond
> > color-choice,
> > > what
> > > > > does that suggest to the student about the
> > > process
> > > > > of
> > > > > art-making in general? In other words, when
> we
> > > teach
> > > > > children, I think we can agree that
> fostering
> > a
> > > > > sense
> > > > > individual expression is a significant goal.
>
> > To
> > > me,
> > > > > creating something that is "pretty" is less
> so
> > -
> > > > > especially if the student is learning that
> art
> > > is
> > > > > about putting things together instead of
> > making
> > > > > different kinds of aesthetic choices.
> > > > >
> > > > > The issue of multiculturalism in art
> education
> > > is a
> > > > > different animal, and I don't think that a
> > good
> > > > > sense
> > > > > of it can necessarily be accomplished by
> > simply
> > > > > making
> > > > > different holiday projects. For example, I
> > > don't
> > > > > think making menorahs will really teach
> > students
> > > > > anything about Judiasm. Multiculturalism,
> to
> > > me, is
> > > > > more about learning about different cultures
> > > (and
> > > > > specifically for our profession through
> art).
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > A lot of the art lessons I have read
> online
>
=== message truncated ===

                
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