Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In Art Assignments

---------

From: david gran (dsgran_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Jun 30 2005 - 19:52:50 PDT


Themes of peace are good anytime of year, not just at
Christmas. However, themes of rebirth around easter
will likely feel a bit marginalizing to your
non-christian students.

--- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:

> The holidays are part of our culture, but art
> projects
> depicting seasonal elements associated with holidays
> (Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, etc.) then become
> essential holiday decorations and are not something
> that would be displayed throughout the year. Most
> of
> us view Christmas as an important part of our
> culture,
> but I doubt any of us have paintings of Santa Claus
> up
> year around.
>
> You can use those holidays as springboards to art
> that
> uses the concepts of celebrations to create artwork
> that would not seem seasonal. For example, a work
> involving the concept of peace for Christmas, a
> nightmare/fear for Halloween, love for Valentine's
> Day, rebirth for Easter, freedom for Black History
> Month, etc. For St. Patrick's Day you could have
> them
> do a monochromatic painting using only green, black,
> and white to depict whatever subject matter they
> choose.
>
>
>
> --- "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> wrote:
>
> > Interesting discussion on creativity.
> >
> > What about looking at seasonal or holiday objects
> as
> > artifacts of culture. I do
> > know that in the past, art educators have usually
> > thought of holiday art as
> > trivial and trite, without much merit. However,
> in
> > more recent times, some
> > have advocated looking at holidays as examples of
> > tradition, celebration, which
> > have an important place in the lives of children.
> > Laura Chapman in her book
> > Approaches to Art in Education advocated looking
> at
> > holidays, traditions and
> > celebrations as a way to look at art and culture.
> > Maybe we have been
> > overlooking an important opportunity to understand
> > our own culture and the
> > culture of others. Taking a value pluralistic
> > stance, might be appropriate
> > when looking at cultural artifacts. The entire
> > discussion really centers
> > around what the purpose of an education in art is.
>
> > It seems there are
> > differing assumptions about what that is or what
> > that entails. It is
> > fascinating to watch the changes unfold over time.
> >
> > Diane
> > --
> > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> > Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> > Studies in Art Education
> > Texas Woman's University
> > Denton, TX 76204
> > dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> > 940-898-2540
> >
> >
> > Quoting Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>:
> >
> > > My problem with creating artwork tightly
> > associated
> > > with holidays is that the art then simply
> becomes
> > a
> > > seasonal decoration. Most people do not keep
> > artwork
> > > depicting Santa Claus, The Easter Bunny, or jack
> > > o'lanterns on display throughout the year. That
> > stuff
> > > seems appropriate only a few weeks out of the
> > year.
> > >
> > > I think you could have projects that sort of tie
> > into
> > > seasonal events, but would also be able to be
> > > displayed throughout the year. For example,
> > Easter
> > > has it's pre-Christian roots in Pagan
> celebrations
> > of
> > > fertility and rebirth symbolized by spring, so
> an
> > > assignment involving flowers would seem to fit
> > nicely
> > > without seeming too seasonal. For Christmas,
> they
> > > could create images of a favorite toys which
> could
> > > possibly tie into a pop art lesson. For
> Halloween
> > > they could create a picture based on a nightmare
> > or
> > > something they fear (such as spiders, snakes,
> > sharks,
> > > etc.).
> > >
> > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > My question would be to ask what value is in
> > making
> > > > art-products that have a predestination. If
> a
> > > > student's input doesn't go beyond
> color-choice,
> > what
> > > > does that suggest to the student about the
> > process
> > > > of
> > > > art-making in general? In other words, when we
> > teach
> > > > children, I think we can agree that fostering
> a
> > > > sense
> > > > individual expression is a significant goal.
> To
> > me,
> > > > creating something that is "pretty" is less so
> -
> > > > especially if the student is learning that art
> > is
> > > > about putting things together instead of
> making
> > > > different kinds of aesthetic choices.
> > > >
> > > > The issue of multiculturalism in art education
> > is a
> > > > different animal, and I don't think that a
> good
> > > > sense
> > > > of it can necessarily be accomplished by
> simply
> > > > making
> > > > different holiday projects. For example, I
> > don't
> > > > think making menorahs will really teach
> students
> > > > anything about Judiasm. Multiculturalism, to
> > me, is
> > > > more about learning about different cultures
> > (and
> > > > specifically for our profession through art).
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > A lot of the art lessons I have read online
> > are
> > > > > assembly line type projects that require a
> > > > specific
> > > > > subject matter created in a specific way.
> > > > >
> > > > > I kind of like the project involving making
> > fish
> > > > out
> > > > > of plastic 2 liter bottles, but I think
> there
> > are
> > > > > enough varieties and colors of fish that the
> > all
> > > > of
> > > > > the projects would look different. It's not
> > the
> > > > > same
> > > > > as everone making shamrocks or Santa Claus
> in
> > the
> > > > > same
> > > > > way.
> > > > >
> > > > > I'm not sure about the idea of making
> projects
> > > > > related
> > > > > to specific religions in art. I think one
> > could
> > > > > argue
> > > > > that if you don't belong to that religion
> then
> > it
> > > > is
> > > > > a
> > > > > multicultural project, but there would be a
> > need
> > > > to
>
=== message truncated ===

http://carrotrevolution.blogspot.com/

The day is coming when an ordinary carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.

-Paul Cezanne

                
____________________________________________________
Yahoo! Sports
Rekindle the Rivalries. Sign up for Fantasy Football
http://football.fantasysports.yahoo.com

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html