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RE: James Joyce

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From: Patricia Knott (pknott_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jun 20 2003 - 11:22:32 PDT


> I think that the creator's intentions should be considered in a
> definition of "what is art?" It shows us that we have several possible
> combinations to consider:
>
> An artist intentionally creates a piece of art, and others perceive it
> as a work of art.

What does that mean?

> An artist intentionally creates a piece of art, and others do not
> perceive it as a work of art.

OOPS you didn't understand the first question go back to GO

> An artist does not intentionally create a piece of art, and others do
> perceive it as a work of art. (can art be accidental?)

Nope If art is everything then it is also nothing no thing

> An artist does not intentionally create a piece of art, and others do
> not perceive it as a work of art. (this is the category I fit into!)

There is no art without intent.
Elephants with brushes Monkeys with cameras NOT ART
art without intent is a monkey with car keys

Intention is the definition of art

>> I think that the creator's intentions should be considered in a
>> definition of "what is art?"

And it always has been. The fact that "objects" of cultures and societies
and the determination of their value is determined by marketers, historians,
aestheticians---high brow people and has nothing to do with the value of
the perceptions but only through fashion and trend becomes valuable, is an
absolute shame. We are told what to value by an elite group seeking a
profit. We art educators exist in a haze where we think what we do matters.
It doesn't matter. Slam-dunking matters more.
But artists will never go away but too bad they have to be long dead
before their intention is recognized or somebody decides to profit from
them within their life time and then that profit motive may cause them
to compromise the intention.

Art is:
made by human beings
has a form
has intention

that is pretty open ended

Larry -- how can you compare making art to making a philosophical
discovery? What is the "process" of philosophy? What is the critical
thinking that crosses both disciplines? What is it that you wonder what art
is? I suspect you equate art with skill/technique? What is the skill of
the philosopher? mmmmmmm.. How can we bring the words of the philosopher
and the images of the artist together? Words are your tool: images are my
tool what's the difference? How is philosophy valued? What's the
market?

Are words important to art? How?

Patty

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