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Lesson Plans


Re: Perspective lies in one's point of view...

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
henry taylor (taylorh)
Mon, 26 Jul 1999 10:46:04 -0700


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Neat Bob!

Apparently "Art" sleeps around. It's been married to religion, politics, =
technology, ecology, science, mathematics, theory, culture, identity, =
psychology, advertising and the absurd Oh and who knows how many =
others. Every decade brings greater disasters from some P.O.V.s

Functional Fixedness! Great model. If you can "install" it in a student =
its a potential first step. It may be easier to get around the fear of =
taking risks when there has been some previous and solid success. They =
can't argue too effectively that they have no skill or talent in art =
after that. Not the only way. Certainly not the "best" way? but a useful =
option for the toolbox.

I like to start with isometric images and overlapping. The majority are =
already geared to the notion of rules and steps. Isometric is easy to =
define in those terms:
Lines go in only a few directions. 1] vertical/perpendicular, 2] angle =
to the left, 3] angle to the right.=20
Every corner has one of each.=20

Then we can distinguish between how objects appear different by =
comparison in photographs and in frieze-type 2D drawings. We can talk =
about WHEN and WHERE (in what context) we would like to use each form.

We can play with photographs and with focus and maybe come to understand =
"depth of field" and consider how that could be applied in a drawing or =
painting. We can identify relative "vanishing points" in a photograph =
and explore how that knowledge could be adopted.

Later we can talk about the limitations of representation which depends =
on perspective and the choices made by other cultures in their forms of =
representation. Denoting importance with size, needing to include all =
the known parts which define the object to achieve another understanding =
of "realistic." the use of symbols, conventions, and the abstract to =
extend this alternative form of "realism" beyond "only that which can be =
seen."

We can collage photographs to model these alternatives and ask what =
works and what doesn't for each of us.

Later still we can return to the Icon and try to appreciate it's great =
depth of field and whether it "works" or not.

And we can discuss the usefulness of flexibility and usefulness of being =
able to choose and to change a point of view or move from POV to POV to =
suit our needs.

AND, whats really fun. Is you can blow this model off completely and do =
it another way just as effectively if not moreso. The important thing is =
to find a model that feels right for you and that you can be =
super-enthusiastic about. Commander Mark for example, a great approach, =
fun, and a very effective starting point.

This year I think that I'm going to play in at least one class with =
collage as a foundation for learning representation and drawing. I found =
a really neat book the other day: Realistic Collage: step by step by =
Michael David Brown and Phil Metzger -- 1998, North Light Books pub. I =
think it offers a neat and unique opportunity to learn to perceive the =
potential 2D aspects of what --we perceive-- as 3D space. To SEE flat so =
we can draw SPACE on a flat surface. (BTW, that's NOT the books aim, of =
course. They just want to demo how to collage in this style. Ya gotta =
improvise!)

-henry

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Neat Bob!
 
Apparently "Art" sleeps = around. It's been=20 married to religion, politics, technology, ecology, science, = mathematics,=20 theory, culture, identity, psychology, advertising and the absurd  = Oh and=20 who knows how many others. Every decade brings greater disasters from = some=20 P.O.V.s
 
Functional Fixedness! Great model. If = you can=20 "install" it in a student its a potential first step. It may = be easier=20 to get around the fear of taking risks when there has been some previous = and=20 solid success. They can't argue too effectively that they have no skill = or=20 talent in art after that. Not the only way. Certainly not the = "best"=20 way? but a useful option for the toolbox.
 
I like to start with isometric images = and=20 overlapping. The majority are already geared to the notion of rules and = steps.=20 Isometric is easy to define in those terms:
Lines go in only a few directions. 1]=20 vertical/perpendicular, 2] angle to the left, 3] angle to the right.=20
Every corner has one of each. =
 
Then we can distinguish between how = objects appear=20 different by comparison in photographs and in frieze-type 2D drawings. = We can=20 talk about WHEN and WHERE (in what context) we would like to use each=20 form.
 
We can play with photographs and = with focus and=20 maybe come to understand "depth of field" and consider how = that could=20 be applied in a drawing or painting. We can identify relative = "vanishing=20 points" in a photograph and explore how that knowledge could be=20 adopted.
 
Later we can talk about the limitations = of=20 representation which depends on perspective and the choices made by = other=20 cultures in their forms of representation. Denoting importance with = size,=20 needing to include all the known parts which define the object to = achieve=20 another understanding of "realistic." the use of symbols, = conventions,=20 and the abstract to extend this alternative form of "realism" = beyond=20 "only that which can be seen."
 
We can collage photographs to model = these=20 alternatives and ask what works and what doesn't for each of = us.
 
Later still we can return to the Icon = and try to=20 appreciate it's great depth of field and whether it "works" or = not.
 
And we can discuss the usefulness of flexibility and = usefulness of being able to choose and to change a point of view or move = from=20 POV to POV to suit our needs.
 
AND, whats really fun. Is you can = blow this=20 model off completely and do it another way just as effectively if not = moreso.=20 The important thing is to find a model that feels right for you and that = you can=20 be super-enthusiastic about. Commander Mark for example, a great = approach, fun,=20 and a very effective starting point.
 
This year I think that I'm going to = play in at=20 least one class with collage as a foundation for learning representation = and=20 drawing. I found a really neat book the other day: Realistic = Collage:=20 step by step by Michael David Brown and Phil Metzger -- 1998, = North=20 Light Books pub. I think it offers a neat and unique opportunity to = learn to=20 perceive the potential 2D aspects of what --we perceive-- as 3D space. = To SEE=20 flat so we can draw SPACE on a flat surface. (BTW, that's NOT the books = aim, of=20 course. They just want to demo how to collage in this style. Ya gotta=20 improvise!)
 
-henry
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