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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1565

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Karen & Neil (karenneil@jc-net.com)
Mon, 26 Jul 1999 09:26:04 -0400


Hi,
I need ideas for a classroom computer. I am getting ONE this year for the
art room. I get the same elementary students for an hour once every 6
school days. My only idea is to let one or two kids on it after their
project is finished. Then, I may be the same students. How can I let
everyone experience the computer? I would also like some elementary lesson
plans or ideas for computers.
Thanks,
Karen

-----Original Message-----
From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest.edu>
To: artsednet-digest.edu
<artsednet-digest.edu>
Date: Sunday, July 25, 1999 9:56 PM
Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1565

>
>artsednet-digest Sunday, July 25 1999 Volume 02 : Number 1565
>
>
>
>This edition includes :
>Re: Institutions - politics (was ....vouchers....) long
>Life Long Learning
>Re: How I turn down art contest requests, etc.
>Re: Life Long Learning
>Vouchers
>Re: How I turn down art contest requests, etc.
>Re: Vouchers
>digital art
>Re: Planning time - Elementary Level
>Gifted Art...read if your involved or interested
>Re: 3 M's to OBLIVION reprint
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 14:59:10 -0500
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Re: Institutions - politics (was ....vouchers....) long
>
>henry taylor wrote:We've learned (falsely) what a pain in the butt
>
>> learning is and are prepared to resist the human resources trainers. (A
few
>> of the "cutting-edge" Gen-Xers seem to have already caught on to the
>> importance of continual learning and are making an effort to insure
ongoing
>> education as a condition of employment BTW)
>
>Henry,
>I have to tell you that recently on a news report they said a current study
of
>retirees who are traveling are demanding to go on trips and tours in which
they
>LEARN things. No deck chairs for this current group of old timers. They
are
>living life to it's fullest. As a true baby boomer I hope to go that same
>route! We don't want to grow old before our time.
>MaryB
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 14:59:51 -0500
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Life Long Learning
>
>henry taylor wrote:We've learned (falsely) what a pain in the butt
>
>> learning is and are prepared to resist the human resources trainers. (A
few
>> of the "cutting-edge" Gen-Xers seem to have already caught on to the
>> importance of continual learning and are making an effort to insure
ongoing
>> education as a condition of employment BTW)
>
>Henry,
>I have to tell you that recently on a news report they said a current study
of
>retirees who are traveling are demanding to go on trips and tours in which
they
>LEARN things. No deck chairs for this current group of old timers. They
are
>living life to it's fullest. As a true baby boomer I hope to go that same
>route! We don't want to grow old before our time.
>MaryB
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 16:19:47 EDT
>From: Artemis420
>Subject: Re: How I turn down art contest requests, etc.
>
>In a message dated 7/25/99 10:33:31 AM EST, Suzannart writes:
>
><< This year I am not doing any contests or ornaments. I may turn down
>requests,
> as I get them, or I may write a note upfront: All contest announcements
can
> be made by the office, kids can turn in entries to the office or to their
> homeroom teachers.
> >>
>So wise of you. The judges are usually adults and judge by their
>standards...usually the slickest and most commercial ones are the winners.
>Artie
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 16:29:35 EDT
>From: Artemis420
>Subject: Re: Life Long Learning
>
>In a message dated 7/25/99 2:59:22 PM EST, gregjuli writes:
>
><< We don't want to grow old before our time.
> MaryB >>
>
>Some studies conclude that 'growing old' for humans is learned. We observed
>our grandparent's generation's behavior and became conditioned. I think it
>was Deepak Chopra who said 'Lions and tigers don't slow down and start
>thinking...well, I'm getting to be an old lion now, I wont hunt as much'!
Use
>it or lose it!
>Artie
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 16:41:52 EDT
>From: Karlawald
>Subject: Vouchers
>
>Concerning school vouchers, it seems to me the taxpayers who insist they
>deserve vouchers so they are not "double-taxed" are completely missing the
>point. We all have the right to send our children to a private school; I'm
>glad we have that right. However, everyone has the collective obligation to
>see that our nation's children are educated. That's why we have public
>schools. That's why they're not called private schools.
>
>It's ridiculous to think that because they chose to educate their own
>children somewhere else that they no longer have to pitch in their share of
>the obligation to see that all children are educated. Even those who chose
to
>have no children are helping to support public education. By giving
vouchers,
>you are releasing people from their portion of that obligation we all
share.
>This is a separate obligation from that of doing what you feel is right for
>your own children.
>
>Those who believe public schools are not doing the children right have an
>added obligation of trying to improve them. That can come from their own
>efforts or from the persons they vote into office. You can't just remove
your
>financial support from any items you don't agree with. Our government is
not
>on a cafeteria plan.
>
>Karla
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 17:49:31 EDT
>From: Deeknik
>Subject: Re: How I turn down art contest requests, etc.
>
>In my area the high school I attended usually recieves most of the local
>awards. When I was in school we copied photographs, nothing was our own.
I
>learned to copy just about anything but had a hard time when it came to
>creating my own art. I am not saying a little of this copying is wrong but
>for all my years of high school all I did was copy photograph after
>photograph with acrylic paint. I never was allowed experiment with any
other
>media because my teacher deemed (right word?) a painter. During that time
I
>was excited about my results and my parents were thrilled. I knew
something
>was missing.
>
>When I got my own classroom I decided not to implement this copying trend.
>Sometimes we go out and take photos to us or create montages to paint from
>but not often. While we have a hard time competing with the copies put out
>by my alma mater I do feel my students will come out ahead in the long run.
>
>Debbie
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 15:13:24 -0700
>From: "henry taylor" <taylorh>
>Subject: Re: Vouchers
>
>>However, everyone has the collective obligation to
>>see that our nation's children are educated
>>Karla
>
>And who gets to define "educated"?
>And who gets to decide that "one (read public education) size fits all"
>
>And who gets to say:
>
>"Kid, the option is ice cream or nothing. If you or your parents want you
to
>have yogurt then pay for it! Oh, and by the way, I need you guys to chip in
>for my kid's ice cream while you're at it--because its only fair. RIGHT
>kid?, You betcha it's right kid. Oh yeah- and, if you can't afford to pay
>for that yogurt all by yer lonesome, you're gonna be eatin' ice cream until
>you're 16 years old because that's the law kid. Besides, we asked. Just
now,
>pretty much everyone agrees that ice cream is good for you and I gotta tell
>ya the jury's still out on yoghurt. ya know? There are some folks that say
>it'll rot you mind and end life as we know it on this continent! You
betcha!
>Think about that. And kid, don't think badly of us, we're only doing what
we
>currenly believe to be best for you.
>
>"One last thing kid. If ya DON'T come in outta the cold. If ya do elect
>another option. Other folks might wonder why. They might ultimately choose
>abandon the system that we experts have decided is the best one for
>everyone. (And trust me, we know wjhat we are about here.) That'll
undermine
>the system kid, and one day, because of you it will all come crashing down
>and no one will be able to be educated safely any more. And it will ALL be
>because of you kid. CAN YOU LIVE WITH THAT?"
>
>Of course everything I just wrote is complete and utter nonsense. Things
>aren't really like that. No one says that stuff. Honest. Don't Panic! All
>that nonsense is nothing but words. Its a simple example of rhetoric and
>memes. It's a model of one tiny part of how we. as a culture come to make
>decisions. In Japan they say that "the nail that stands up will get nailed
>down" another way of saying "Don't make waves." I just modeled "wave
>dampening" rhetorical device in overly simplistic and hyperbolic terms.
>
>But all the important life-shaping decisions are made off campus in the
>cultural rhetoric of the dialectic. These are just a few of the tools
>deployed in the process. You use 'em I use 'em--whether we know it or not
>whether we intend it or not. Argument and persuasion are fascinating
>processes most often having little to do with anything else.
>
>Karla's right I have an obligation along with the rest of the collective to
>see that our nation's children are educated. I'm working on it. My 2 cents
>might not be worth much. But then I didn't expect that they would be. <VBG>
>
>cheers
>- -henry
>
>(If you want to send your kids to a private school ask about it. If you are
>needy, the school might waive the tuition like one of mine did. Worth the
>effort of asking at the very least. So, who needs vouchers anyway?)
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 19:09:03 EDT
>From: DIGARTIST1
>Subject: digital art
>
>This past year I started a computer art program grades 1-5 and would like
to
>share ideas with other art teachers. We started with one computer, and
based
>on what the students were abe to acomplish we now have five computers. the
>first few projects are on my web site http://www.kidzart.org/gallery.html
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 19:51:34 -0400 (EDT)
>From: Laura McCoy <lmccoy>
>Subject: Re: Planning time - Elementary Level
>
>Hi there,
>
>I'm quite interested in issues of prep time, because I feel that I never
>have enough! At the school where I taught last year, I had 3 prep periods
>in a 6 day cycle. This meant every second day, I had last period free,
>although this was the shortest period in the day, and meant that I had
>about 30 minutes to myself. At this school lunch was 1 hour and I only had
>lunch duty for a couple of weeks in the year, so I usually had lunches
>free. At the school I am going to be at next year, I do have a 40 minute
>prep every day, but lunches are only forty minutes and I have more days of
>duty.
>
>I would be interested to hear what others have.
>
>Laura
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 20:18:20 EDT
>From: GBWOLF
>Subject: Gifted Art...read if your involved or interested
>
>Hello to all of you interested in Gifted Art Programs. I kept track of
posts
>on this subjects, saving them for a Grad. Class I'm taking in
Administration.
>The following people responded to various posts/threads on Gifted Art
during
>the past school year.
> *Daniella, Art Teacher @ Gifted School
> *Teri Brudnack, Art Teacher @ Magnet Arts HS
> •Sandy Hildreth, Art Teacher, Madrid Waddington, NY
> •Julie Richard @ University ofArizona
>
> •Betti Longinotti, K-12 Lead Art Teacher, Winston-Salem/Forsythe
>County Public School System, NC
> •Ellyn Wenk
> *Valerie Bock
> •Marcia
> •Judy Grochowski, Greenfield HS, Greenfield, Wisconsin
> •Christine Merriam, Kayenta Intermediate School
> •Linda White- G&T Teacher (former art teacher), Norman, Oklahoma
> *Charlotte
>
>I am looking for additional information about you and your programs to
>include for content and resource material for my project.
>
>I am trying to initiate a G&T Program in my district. We already have an
>academics based, pull out style program in place in our district for grades
>3-7. We want to build onto it by adding G&T Art and Music. My district's
>Administration has said go create the Proposal and we'll take it from
there.
>
>
>Any additional information regarding the following subjects would be most
>appreciated:
> Benefits of Implementing a Gifted and Talented Program
> Existing Models in Practice
> Programming Needs such as...
> Costs (salaried staff, class time impact, resource materials
>cost)
> Location
> Schedule for Implementation
> Curriculum and Instruction
> Alignment with National and State Standards
> Types of Testing to Gain Entry into the Program/Qualify as
>Gifted
> etc...
>
>I'm hoping since it's summer, some of you may have time and be able to
help.
>If you are not interested that is fine. If you know of any other web
sites,
>resource materials, etc... I'd love to hear from you!
>
>*=If you know someone starred on the list above, I don't know their email
>address...if you know any more about them (last names, districts, email
>address, etc...), please let me know.
>
>BE SURE TO INCLUDE YOUR NAME, JOB, DISTRICT, CITY-STATE, GRADES TAUGHT,
ETC...
>
>I'll share any information gained with our little sub group of ArtsEdNet if
>you're interested.
>
>Thanks so much for helping!
>
>- -Becca Ireland, Art Department Coordinator
>Indian River Central School District
>Philadelphia, NY 13673
>email: gbwolf
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 25 Jul 1999 18:51:01 -0700
>From: "Bob Beeching" <robprod>
>Subject: Re: 3 M's to OBLIVION reprint
>
>This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
>- ------=_NextPart_000_0014_01BED6CE.A439A1C0
>Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
> boundary="----=_NextPart_001_0015_01BED6CE.A439A1C0"
>
>
>- ------=_NextPart_001_0015_01BED6CE.A439A1C0
>Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
>Dana wrote:
>
>Hi,
>Saw your post on Artsednet. I was fascinated by the subject matter as =
>here in Australia this sort of debate is not being pushed in the media. =
>I would really like to read more about it but have not been able to find =
>the Edward Miller article in the New York Times. I was wondering if you =
>could let me know if it is on the net or what the date was that it =
>appeared so that I could try and look it up in the archives. Thanks for =
>the thoughtful article.
>Gina Grant...
>
>Bob's reply:
>
>As teachers, we are sometimes at a loss for words when combating the =
>on-slaughter of any bureaucracy, and particularly when defending our =
>role as teacher. Here is an article (extended) from the original - =
>published in the Sierra Star, Oakhurst, CA. You may want to make copies =
>as a pass-out for a discussion item for your next faculty meeting? Here =
>is the article in full. I have mailed the article as both a post and as =
>an attachment for those who use them.
>
>Incidentally, this fear of opening attachments is grossly over-blown. =
>You receive attachments everyday from the Internet. Perhaps, you are not =
>aware of them. Attachments are quicker to send and to receive than are =
>regular posts....enjoy!
>
>3 M's to OBLIVION
>
>By
>
>Robert B. Beeching
>
>Excerpted from author Edward Miller
>
>
>
>
>"WHAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION LOOK LIKE IN THE NEXT CENTURY?" asks =
>author Edward Miller. "For one thing, you can forget about the 'Three =
>R's,' student-teacher interaction, and make way for 'Multi-Tasking', =
>'Materialistics,' and 'Mind Management.' " where computers will create =
>the learning environment, sans teacher.
>
>"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market =
>Dominance was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers =
>who are looking at a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering =
>what is in store for books in 2000 and beyond."
>
>It is not only the publishers who are worried about where technology is =
>taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are caught in a =
>dilemma of what will comprise future learning modes. Will they be real =
>or virtual?
>
>Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best schools =
>or classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates that many =
>Americans believe that computer training has out-classed the study of =
>history, literature, foreign languages, science, the arts, and even =
>physical education. In their place, business and industry looks forward =
>to employees who are able to do many things at once. Productivity =
>suffers when employees are undone by information overload or the demands =
>of multi-media, hypertext, and inter-active office."
>
>Employers are more interested in processing their accounts than they are =
>in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their motivation, not =
>education. This corporate Orwellian approach to education must be =
>seriously questioned.
>
>When learning - anything - children tend to concentrate on one task or =
>object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate nature, science, =
>and the arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more than any =
>computer-generated imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states in the =
>preface to his latest book: The Hand. "How its use shapes the brain, =
>language, and human culture," no manipulation of a keyboard can match.
>
>"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither are =
>they in direct contact with their immediate environment. They are not =
>learning to read, write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, dance, =
>act, or how to play a musical instrument. They have, instead, become =
>passive slaves to the television and computer screens - thereby avoiding =
>the process of becoming effective and productive members of their =
>communities.
>
>If we - as parents and teachers - allow business to have its way with =
>general public school instruction, the writing is on the wall where the =
>tangible field trip - that alerts all the senses - will eventually be =
>replaced by virtual reality field trips on CD's. Instead of hands-on =
>arts and science experiments children will become passive observers of =
>life. There will be no need of the classroom teacher because computer =
>programs will become surrogate teachers with the ability to score tests, =
>spew out computer-generated lesson plans, student guides, and report =
>cards - all efficient, cost-effective and depersonalized.
>
>"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to digitize =
>education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom teacher has a =
>better grip on how children learn than many educational psychologists - =
>who along with their business cohorts - have painted a rosy and =
>subjective picture of how computer literacy can advance the learning =
>process.
>
>>From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a child's =
>actions and emotions, ready to step in with a personal observation, a =
>soothing touch, or a voice of reassurance; something a computer is =
>incapable of performing.
>
>Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA meeting =
>in fear of sounding old fashion. They are feeling the enormous weight =
>and expense of wiring up their schools; monies deliberately taken away =
>from essential classroom realia, materials and supplies, and replacing =
>books in the school library with computer stations.
>
>In the rush toward the information super highway, we tend to forget how =
>people learn to develop a culture. A machine can never replace the =
>awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality of the human =
>spirit. Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a teacher =
>reading and discussing a story to his or her students, or reacting to =
>the spark in a student's eyes.
>
>As with the introduction of the Underwood typewriter in the late 1800's, =
>let us hope that electronic computing will eventually settle down to =
>become another tool - not the be-all many of its proponents claim - but =
>a valuable information and distribution source for the next century.=20
>
>______________________________________________________________rb
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>- ------=_NextPart_001_0015_01BED6CE.A439A1C0
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> charset="iso-8859-1"
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
><!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
><HTML><HEAD>
><META content=3D"text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1" =
>http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
><META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=3DGENERATOR>
><STYLE></STYLE>
></HEAD>
><BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
><DIV><FONT size=3D2>Dana wrote:</FONT></DIV>
><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
><DIV><FONT size=3D2>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999><FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial =
>
>size=3D2>Hi,</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999><FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial =
>size=3D2>Saw=20
>your post on Artsednet.&nbsp; I was fascinated by the subject matter as =
>here in=20
>Australia this sort of debate is not being pushed in the media.&nbsp; I =
>would=20
>really like to read more about it but have not been able to find the =
>Edward=20
>Miller article in the New York Times.&nbsp; I was wondering if you could =
>let me=20
>know if it is on the net or what the date was that it appeared so that I =
>could=20
>try and look it up in the archives.&nbsp; Thanks for the thoughtful=20
>article.</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999><FONT color=3D#000000 face=3DArial =
>size=3D2>Gina=20
>Grant...</FONT></SPAN></DIV>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999>Bob's reply:</SPAN></DIV>
><DIV><SPAN class=3D420043807-25071999></SPAN>&nbsp;</DIV>
><DIV>As teachers, we are sometimes at a loss for words when combating =
>the=20
>on-slaughter of any bureaucracy, and particularly when defending our =
>role as=20
>teacher. Here is an article (extended) from the original - published in =
>the=20
>Sierra Star, Oakhurst, CA. You may want to make&nbsp;copies&nbsp;as a =
>pass-out=20
>for a discussion item&nbsp;for your next faculty meeting? Here is the =
>article in=20
>full. I have mailed&nbsp;the article as both a post and as an attachment =
>for=20
>those who use them.</DIV>
><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
><DIV>Incidentally, this fear of opening attachments is grossly =
>over-blown. You=20
>receive attachments everyday from the Internet. Perhaps, you are not =
>aware of=20
>them. Attachments are quicker to send and to receive than are regular=20
>posts....enjoy!</DIV>
><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
><DIV><B><FONT size=3D5>
><P align=3Dcenter>3 M's to OBLIVION</P></B></FONT>
><P align=3Dcenter>By</P>
><P align=3Dcenter>Robert B. Beeching</P><FONT size=3D2>
><P align=3Dcenter>Excerpted from author Edward Miller</P>
><P align=3Dcenter>&nbsp;</P>
><P></P>
><P></FONT><FONT size=3D5>"W</FONT><B>HAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION LOOK =
>LIKE IN THE=20
>NEXT CENTURY?" </B>asks author Edward Miller. "For one thing, you can =
>forget=20
>about the 'Three R's,' student-teacher interaction, and make way for=20
><I>'Multi-Tasking', 'Materialistics,' </I>and <I>'Mind Management.' " =
></I>where=20
>computers will create the learning environment, <I>sans </I>teacher.</P>
><P>"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market =
>Dominance=20
>was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers who are =
>looking at=20
>a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering what is in store for =
>books=20
>in 2000 and beyond."</P>
><P>It is not only the publishers who are worried about where technology =
>is=20
>taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are caught in a =
>dilemma of=20
>what will comprise future learning modes. Will they be <I>real </I>or=20
><I>virtual</I>?</P>
><P>Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best =
>schools or=20
>classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates that many =
>Americans=20
>believe that computer training has out-classed the study of history, =
>literature,=20
>foreign languages, science, the arts, and even physical education. In =
>their=20
>place, business and industry looks forward to employees who are able to =
>do many=20
>things at once. Productivity suffers when employees are undone by =
>information=20
>overload or the demands of <I>multi-media, hypertext, </I>and =
><I>inter-active=20
>office."</P>
><P></I>Employers are more interested in processing their accounts than =
>they are=20
>in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their motivation, not =
>education.=20
>This corporate <I>Orwellian </I>approach to education must be seriously=20
>questioned.</P>
><P>When learning - <I>anything -</I> children tend to concentrate on one =
>task or=20
>object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate nature, science, =
>and the=20
>arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more than any =
>computer-generated=20
>imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states in the preface to his latest =
>book:=20
><I><U>The Hand</I></U>. "How its use shapes the brain, language, and =
>human=20
>culture," no manipulation of a keyboard can match.</P>
><P>"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither are =
>they in=20
>direct contact with their immediate environment. They are not learning =
>to read,=20
>write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, dance, act, or how to play =
>a=20
>musical instrument. They have, instead, become passive slaves to the =
>television=20
>and computer screens - thereby avoiding the process of becoming =
>effective and=20
>productive members of their communities.</P>
><P>If we - as parents and teachers - allow business to have its way with =
>general=20
>public school instruction, <I>the writing is on the wall</I> where the =
>tangible=20
>field trip - that alerts all the senses - will eventually be replaced by =
>
>virtual<I> reality field trips</I> on CD's. Instead of hands-on arts and =
>science=20
>experiments children will become passive observers of life. There will =
>be no=20
>need of the classroom teacher because computer programs will become =
>surrogate=20
>teachers with the ability to score tests, spew out computer-generated =
>lesson=20
>plans, student guides, and report cards - all efficient, cost-effective =
>and=20
><I>de</I>personalized.</P>
><P>"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to =
>digitize=20
>education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom teacher has a =
>better=20
>grip on how children learn than many educational psychologists - who =
>along with=20
>their business cohorts - have painted a rosy and subjective picture of =
>how=20
>computer literacy can advance the learning process.</P>
><P>From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a child's =
>actions=20
>and emotions, ready to step in with a personal observation, a soothing =
>touch, or=20
>a voice of reassurance; something a computer is incapable of =
>performing.</P>
><P>Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA =
>meeting in=20
>fear of sounding <I>old fashion.</I> They are feeling the enormous =
>weight and=20
>expense of wiring up their schools; monies deliberately taken away from=20
>essential classroom <I>realia, </I>materials and supplies, and replacing =
>books=20
>in the school library with computer stations.</P>
><P>In the rush toward the <I>information super highway, </I>we tend to =
>forget=20
>how people learn to develop a culture. A <I>machine </I>can never =
>replace the=20
>awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality of the human =
>spirit.=20
>Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a teacher reading and=20
>discussing a story to his or her students, or reacting to the spark in a =
>
>student's eyes.</P>
><P>As with the introduction of the <I>Underwood </I>typewriter in the =
>late=20
>1800's, let us hope that electronic<I> computing</I> will eventually =
>settle down=20
>to become another tool - not the <I>be-all</I> many of its proponents =
>claim -<I>=20
></I>but a valuable information and distribution source for the next =
>century.=20
></P>
><P>______________________________________________________________rb</P></=
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><FONT SIZE=3D2><P>Robert Beeching First Serial Rights</P>
><P>44655 Femmon Ranch Road Copyright</FONT><FONT FACE=3D"Symbol" =
>SIZE=3D2>&Oacute;</FONT><FONT SIZE=3D2> 1999</P>
><P>Ahwahnee, CA 93601 Approximate Word Count: 766</P>
><P>559 683 8293</P>
></FONT><B><FONT SIZE=3D5><P ALIGN=3D"CENTER">3 M's to OBLIVION</P>
></B></FONT><P ALIGN=3D"CENTER">By</P>
><P ALIGN=3D"CENTER">Robert B. Beeching</P>
><FONT SIZE=3D2><P ALIGN=3D"CENTER">Excerpted from author Edward =
>Miller</P>
><P ALIGN=3D"CENTER">&nbsp;</P>
><P>&#9;</P>
><P>&#9;</FONT><FONT SIZE=3D5>"W</FONT><B>HAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION =
>LOOK LIKE IN THE NEXT CENTURY?" </B>asks author Edward Miller. "For one =
>thing, you can forget about the 'Three R's,' student-teacher =
>interaction, and make way for <I>'Multi-Tasking', 'Materialistics,' =
></I>and <I>'Mind Management.' " </I>where computers will create the =
>learning environment, <I>sans </I>teacher.</P>
><P>&#9;"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market =
>Dominance was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers =
>who are looking at a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering =
>what is in store for books in 2000 and beyond."</P>
><P>&#9;It is not only the publishers who are worried about where =
>technology is taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are =
>caught in a dilemma of what will comprise future learning modes. Will =
>they be <I>real </I>or <I>virtual</I>?</P>
><P>Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best =
>schools or classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates =
>that many Americans believe that computer training has out-classed the =
>study of history, literature, foreign languages, science, the arts, and =
>even physical education. In their place, business and industry looks =
>forward to employees who are able to do many things at once. =
>Productivity suffers when employees are undone by information overload =
>or the demands of <I>multi-media, hypertext, </I>and <I>inter-active =
>office."</P>
><P>&#9;</I>Employers are more interested in processing their accounts =
>than they are in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their =
>motivation, not education. This corporate <I>Orwellian </I>approach to =
>education must be seriously questioned.</P>
><P>&#9;When learning - <I>anything -</I> children tend to concentrate on =
>one task or object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate =
>nature, science, and the arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more =
>than any computer-generated imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states =
>in the preface to his latest book: <I><U>The Hand</I></U>. "How its use =
>shapes the brain, language, and human culture," no manipulation of a =
>keyboard can match.</P>
><P>&#9;"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither =
>are they in direct contact with their immediate environment. They are =
>not learning to read, write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, =
>dance, act, or how to play a musical instrument. They have, instead, =
>become passive slaves to the television and computer screens - thereby =
>avoiding the process of becoming effective and productive members of =
>their communities.</P>
><P>&#9;If we - as parents and teachers - we allow business to have its =
>way with general public school instruction, <I>the writing is on the =
>wall</I> where the tangible field trip - that alert all the senses - =
>will eventually be replaced by virtual<I> reality field trips</I> on =
>CD's. Instead of hands-on arts and science experiments children will =
>become passive observers of life. There will be no need of the classroom =
>teacher because computer programs will become surrogate teachers with =
>the ability to score tests, spew out computer-generated lesson plans, =
>student guides, and report cards - all efficient, cost-effective and =
><I>de</I>personalized.</P>
><P>&#9;"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to =
>digitize education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom =
>teacher has a better grip on how children learn than many educational =
>psychologists - who along with their business cohorts - have painted a =
>rosy and subjective picture of how computer literacy can advance the =
>learning process.</P>
><P>&#9;From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a =
>child's actions and emotions, ready to step in with a personal =
>observation, a soothing touch, or a voice of reassurance; something a =
>computer is incapable of performing.</P>
><P>&#9;Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA =
>meeting in fear of sounding <I>old fashion.</I> They are feeling the =
>enormous weight and expense of wiring up their schools; monies =
>deliberately taken away from essential classroom <I>realia, =
></I>materials and supplies, and replacing books in the school library =
>with computer stations.</P>
><P>&#9;In the rush toward the <I>information super highway, </I>we tend =
>to forget how people learn to develop a culture. A <I>machine </I>can =
>never replace the awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality =
>of the human spirit. Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a =
>teacher reading and discussing a story to his or her students, or =
>reacting to the spark in a student's eyes.</P>
><P>&#9;As with the introduction of the <I>Underwood </I>typewriter in =
>the late 1800's, let us hope that electronic<I> computing</I> will =
>eventually settle down to become another tool - not the <I>be-all</I> =
>many of its proponents claim -<I> </I>but a valuable information and =
>distribution source for the next century. &#9;</P></BODY>
></HTML>
>
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>
>------------------------------
>
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