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Lesson Plans


Re: 3 M's to OBLIVION reprint

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bob Beeching (robprod)
Sun, 25 Jul 1999 18:51:01 -0700


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Dana wrote:

Hi,
Saw your post on Artsednet. I was fascinated by the subject matter as =
here in Australia this sort of debate is not being pushed in the media. =
I would really like to read more about it but have not been able to find =
the Edward Miller article in the New York Times. I was wondering if you =
could let me know if it is on the net or what the date was that it =
appeared so that I could try and look it up in the archives. Thanks for =
the thoughtful article.
Gina Grant...

Bob's reply:

As teachers, we are sometimes at a loss for words when combating the =
on-slaughter of any bureaucracy, and particularly when defending our =
role as teacher. Here is an article (extended) from the original - =
published in the Sierra Star, Oakhurst, CA. You may want to make copies =
as a pass-out for a discussion item for your next faculty meeting? Here =
is the article in full. I have mailed the article as both a post and as =
an attachment for those who use them.

Incidentally, this fear of opening attachments is grossly over-blown. =
You receive attachments everyday from the Internet. Perhaps, you are not =
aware of them. Attachments are quicker to send and to receive than are =
regular posts....enjoy!

3 M's to OBLIVION

By

Robert B. Beeching

Excerpted from author Edward Miller

"WHAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION LOOK LIKE IN THE NEXT CENTURY?" asks =
author Edward Miller. "For one thing, you can forget about the 'Three =
R's,' student-teacher interaction, and make way for 'Multi-Tasking', =
'Materialistics,' and 'Mind Management.' " where computers will create =
the learning environment, sans teacher.

"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market =
Dominance was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers =
who are looking at a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering =
what is in store for books in 2000 and beyond."

It is not only the publishers who are worried about where technology is =
taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are caught in a =
dilemma of what will comprise future learning modes. Will they be real =
or virtual?

Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best schools =
or classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates that many =
Americans believe that computer training has out-classed the study of =
history, literature, foreign languages, science, the arts, and even =
physical education. In their place, business and industry looks forward =
to employees who are able to do many things at once. Productivity =
suffers when employees are undone by information overload or the demands =
of multi-media, hypertext, and inter-active office."

Employers are more interested in processing their accounts than they are =
in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their motivation, not =
education. This corporate Orwellian approach to education must be =
seriously questioned.

When learning - anything - children tend to concentrate on one task or =
object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate nature, science, =
and the arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more than any =
computer-generated imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states in the =
preface to his latest book: The Hand. "How its use shapes the brain, =
language, and human culture," no manipulation of a keyboard can match.

"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither are =
they in direct contact with their immediate environment. They are not =
learning to read, write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, dance, =
act, or how to play a musical instrument. They have, instead, become =
passive slaves to the television and computer screens - thereby avoiding =
the process of becoming effective and productive members of their =
communities.

If we - as parents and teachers - allow business to have its way with =
general public school instruction, the writing is on the wall where the =
tangible field trip - that alerts all the senses - will eventually be =
replaced by virtual reality field trips on CD's. Instead of hands-on =
arts and science experiments children will become passive observers of =
life. There will be no need of the classroom teacher because computer =
programs will become surrogate teachers with the ability to score tests, =
spew out computer-generated lesson plans, student guides, and report =
cards - all efficient, cost-effective and depersonalized.

"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to digitize =
education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom teacher has a =
better grip on how children learn than many educational psychologists - =
who along with their business cohorts - have painted a rosy and =
subjective picture of how computer literacy can advance the learning =
process.

>From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a child's =
actions and emotions, ready to step in with a personal observation, a =
soothing touch, or a voice of reassurance; something a computer is =
incapable of performing.

Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA meeting =
in fear of sounding old fashion. They are feeling the enormous weight =
and expense of wiring up their schools; monies deliberately taken away =
from essential classroom realia, materials and supplies, and replacing =
books in the school library with computer stations.

In the rush toward the information super highway, we tend to forget how =
people learn to develop a culture. A machine can never replace the =
awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality of the human =
spirit. Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a teacher =
reading and discussing a story to his or her students, or reacting to =
the spark in a student's eyes.

As with the introduction of the Underwood typewriter in the late 1800's, =
let us hope that electronic computing will eventually settle down to =
become another tool - not the be-all many of its proponents claim - but =
a valuable information and distribution source for the next century.=20

______________________________________________________________rb

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Dana wrote:
 
Hi,
Saw=20 your post on Artsednet.  I was fascinated by the subject matter as = here in=20 Australia this sort of debate is not being pushed in the media.  I = would=20 really like to read more about it but have not been able to find the = Edward=20 Miller article in the New York Times.  I was wondering if you could = let me=20 know if it is on the net or what the date was that it appeared so that I = could=20 try and look it up in the archives.  Thanks for the thoughtful=20 article.
Gina=20 Grant...
 
Bob's reply:
 
As teachers, we are sometimes at a loss for words when combating = the=20 on-slaughter of any bureaucracy, and particularly when defending our = role as=20 teacher. Here is an article (extended) from the original - published in = the=20 Sierra Star, Oakhurst, CA. You may want to make copies as a = pass-out=20 for a discussion item for your next faculty meeting? Here is the = article in=20 full. I have mailed the article as both a post and as an attachment = for=20 those who use them.
 
Incidentally, this fear of opening attachments is grossly = over-blown. You=20 receive attachments everyday from the Internet. Perhaps, you are not = aware of=20 them. Attachments are quicker to send and to receive than are regular=20 posts....enjoy!
 

3 M's to OBLIVION

By

Robert B. Beeching

Excerpted from author Edward Miller

 

"WHAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION LOOK = LIKE IN THE=20 NEXT CENTURY?" asks author Edward Miller. "For one thing, you can = forget=20 about the 'Three R's,' student-teacher interaction, and make way for=20 'Multi-Tasking', 'Materialistics,' and 'Mind Management.' " = where=20 computers will create the learning environment, sans teacher.

"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market = Dominance=20 was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers who are = looking at=20 a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering what is in store for = books=20 in 2000 and beyond."

It is not only the publishers who are worried about where technology = is=20 taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are caught in a = dilemma of=20 what will comprise future learning modes. Will they be real or=20 virtual?

Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best = schools or=20 classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates that many = Americans=20 believe that computer training has out-classed the study of history, = literature,=20 foreign languages, science, the arts, and even physical education. In = their=20 place, business and industry looks forward to employees who are able to = do many=20 things at once. Productivity suffers when employees are undone by = information=20 overload or the demands of multi-media, hypertext, and = inter-active=20 office."

Employers are more interested in processing their accounts than = they are=20 in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their motivation, not = education.=20 This corporate Orwellian approach to education must be seriously=20 questioned.

When learning - anything - children tend to concentrate on one = task or=20 object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate nature, science, = and the=20 arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more than any = computer-generated=20 imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states in the preface to his latest = book:=20 The Hand. "How its use shapes the brain, language, and = human=20 culture," no manipulation of a keyboard can match.

"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither are = they in=20 direct contact with their immediate environment. They are not learning = to read,=20 write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, dance, act, or how to play = a=20 musical instrument. They have, instead, become passive slaves to the = television=20 and computer screens - thereby avoiding the process of becoming = effective and=20 productive members of their communities.

If we - as parents and teachers - allow business to have its way with = general=20 public school instruction, the writing is on the wall where the = tangible=20 field trip - that alerts all the senses - will eventually be replaced by = virtual reality field trips on CD's. Instead of hands-on arts and = science=20 experiments children will become passive observers of life. There will = be no=20 need of the classroom teacher because computer programs will become = surrogate=20 teachers with the ability to score tests, spew out computer-generated = lesson=20 plans, student guides, and report cards - all efficient, cost-effective = and=20 depersonalized.

"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to = digitize=20 education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom teacher has a = better=20 grip on how children learn than many educational psychologists - who = along with=20 their business cohorts - have painted a rosy and subjective picture of = how=20 computer literacy can advance the learning process.

From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a child's = actions=20 and emotions, ready to step in with a personal observation, a soothing = touch, or=20 a voice of reassurance; something a computer is incapable of = performing.

Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA = meeting in=20 fear of sounding old fashion. They are feeling the enormous = weight and=20 expense of wiring up their schools; monies deliberately taken away from=20 essential classroom realia, materials and supplies, and replacing = books=20 in the school library with computer stations.

In the rush toward the information super highway, we tend to = forget=20 how people learn to develop a culture. A machine can never = replace the=20 awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality of the human = spirit.=20 Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a teacher reading and=20 discussing a story to his or her students, or reacting to the spark in a = student's eyes.

As with the introduction of the Underwood typewriter in the = late=20 1800's, let us hope that electronic computing will eventually = settle down=20 to become another tool - not the be-all many of its proponents = claim -=20 but a valuable information and distribution source for the next = century.=20

______________________________________________________________rb

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= ------=_NextPart_001_0015_01BED6CE.A439A1C0-- ------=_NextPart_000_0014_01BED6CE.A439A1C0 Content-Type: text/html; name="3 M's to OBLIVION.htm" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="3 M's to OBLIVION.htm" 3 M's to OBLIVION

Robert Beeching First Serial Rights

44655 Femmon Ranch Road CopyrightÓ 1999

Ahwahnee, CA 93601 Approximate Word Count: 766

559 683 8293

3 M's to OBLIVION

By

Robert B. Beeching

Excerpted from author Edward = Miller

 

"WHAT WILL AMERICAN EDUCATION = LOOK LIKE IN THE NEXT CENTURY?" asks author Edward Miller. "For one = thing, you can forget about the 'Three R's,' student-teacher = interaction, and make way for 'Multi-Tasking', 'Materialistics,' = and 'Mind Management.' " where computers will create the = learning environment, sans teacher.

"Unleashing the Killer Application: Digital Strategies for Market = Dominance was the subject of a recent meeting of school text publishers = who are looking at a current $640 billion-a-year market, and wondering = what is in store for books in 2000 and beyond."

It is not only the publishers who are worried about where = technology is taking us, but thoughtful parents and teachers who are = caught in a dilemma of what will comprise future learning modes. Will = they be real or virtual?

Many parents "fear that their children won't get into the best = schools or classrooms," states Mr. Miller. "A recent survey indicates = that many Americans believe that computer training has out-classed the = study of history, literature, foreign languages, science, the arts, and = even physical education. In their place, business and industry looks = forward to employees who are able to do many things at once. = Productivity suffers when employees are undone by information overload = or the demands of multi-media, hypertext, and inter-active = office."

Employers are more interested in processing their accounts = than they are in developing thinking individuals. Profits are their = motivation, not education. This corporate Orwellian approach to = education must be seriously questioned.

When learning - anything - children tend to concentrate on = one task or object at a time. That is how they learn to appreciate = nature, science, and the arts. "A butterfly in the hand" is worth more = than any computer-generated imagery, as neurologist Frank Wilson states = in the preface to his latest book: The Hand. "How its use = shapes the brain, language, and human culture," no manipulation of a = keyboard can match.

"Children glued to a computer terminal are not outdoors," neither = are they in direct contact with their immediate environment. They are = not learning to read, write, and solve mathematical problems, sing, = dance, act, or how to play a musical instrument. They have, instead, = become passive slaves to the television and computer screens - thereby = avoiding the process of becoming effective and productive members of = their communities.

If we - as parents and teachers - we allow business to have its = way with general public school instruction, the writing is on the = wall where the tangible field trip - that alert all the senses - = will eventually be replaced by virtual reality field trips on = CD's. Instead of hands-on arts and science experiments children will = become passive observers of life. There will be no need of the classroom = teacher because computer programs will become surrogate teachers with = the ability to score tests, spew out computer-generated lesson plans, = student guides, and report cards - all efficient, cost-effective and = depersonalized.

"Teachers are often seen as the stumbling block in efforts to = digitize education" states Miller. In many instances, the classroom = teacher has a better grip on how children learn than many educational = psychologists - who along with their business cohorts - have painted a = rosy and subjective picture of how computer literacy can advance the = learning process.

From daily experience, teachers are in constant touch with a = child's actions and emotions, ready to step in with a personal = observation, a soothing touch, or a voice of reassurance; something a = computer is incapable of performing.

Unfortunately these teachers rarely speak up at a faculty or PTA = meeting in fear of sounding old fashion. They are feeling the = enormous weight and expense of wiring up their schools; monies = deliberately taken away from essential classroom realia, = materials and supplies, and replacing books in the school library = with computer stations.

In the rush toward the information super highway, we tend = to forget how people learn to develop a culture. A machine can = never replace the awareness, flexibility, sensitivity, and originality = of the human spirit. Neither can it replace the human inter-action of a = teacher reading and discussing a story to his or her students, or = reacting to the spark in a student's eyes.

As with the introduction of the Underwood typewriter in = the late 1800's, let us hope that electronic computing will = eventually settle down to become another tool - not the be-all = many of its proponents claim - but a valuable information and = distribution source for the next century.

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