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Lesson Plans


Re: SCOPE and SEQUENCE

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bob Beeching (robprod)
Thu, 22 Jul 1999 12:36:31 -0700


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----- Original Message -----=20
From: Bob Beeching=20
To: Bob Beeching=20
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 1999 12:14 PM

RE: "While many of us have fought very hard for years to get =
the larger=20
community to buy into the need for good quality, =
sequential art education
for students..."

REPLY: ...the problem is compounded by the discontinuity in the =
teaching of the
arts. Although the teaching of music and sports =
follows a scope and
sequence approach within the elementary grades =
framework - this is
not the case for visual arts training until a child =
reaches high school.

Unlike Sports and Music education, Visual arts tend to =
be taught cafeteria-
style by teachers displaying different levels of =
knowledge and expertise.
=20
One may question a practice where the arts are =
acknowledged by the
observation and verbal discussion of object and =
artifact, and at the same
time, negating the processes by which these objects and =
artifacts are
produced?

Visual Arts will continue to suffer from benign =
neglect as long as they operate
without a rudder. Currently, visual arts are whatever a =
parent, teacher, or student
thinks them to be. When the arts reach the level of a =
discipline-based scope and
sequnce approach to learning, the general public will =
then be able to differentiate
more readily between art and craft.
=20
We will continue to debate the merits of the value of =
visual arts training as long
as we continue to deny children exposure to the same =
learning sequences
we normally apply to the teaching of reading,writing, =
and arithmetic.

If the visual arts continue to be introduced as =
novelty projects, the general public
will continue to view visual arts as a desparate =
collection of isolated variables that are
"fun" to do and apply to a rainy day activity not =
necessarily related to serious
academic studies.=20
=20
=20

=20

=20

=20

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----- Original Message -----
From:=20 Bob=20 Beeching
To: Bob=20 Beeching
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 1999 = 12:14=20 PM

      RE:   = "While many=20 of us have fought very hard for years to get the larger
          &nbs= p;   =20 community to buy into the need for good quality, sequential art=20 education
          &nbs= p;   =20 for students..."
 
REPLY: ...the problem is compounded by the = discontinuity in=20 the teaching of the
          &nbs= p;    =20 arts. Although the teaching of music and sports follows a scope=20 and
          &nbs= p;    sequence=20 approach within the elementary grades framework - this = is
          &nbs= p;    not=20 the case for visual arts training until a child reaches high=20 school.
 
          &nbs= p;    Unlike=20 Sports and Music education, Visual arts tend to be taught=20 cafeteria-
          &nbs= p;   =20 style by teachers displaying different levels of knowledge and=20 expertise.
          &nbs= p;    
          &nbs= p;   =20 One may question a practice where the arts are = acknowledged by=20 the
          &nbs= p;   =20 observation and verbal discussion of object and artifact, and at the=20 same
          &nbs= p;   =20 time, negating the processes by which = these=20 objects and artifacts are
          &nbs= p;   =20 produced?
 
        =    =20     Visual Arts will continue to suffer from benign = neglect as=20 long as they operate
          &nbs= p;   =20 without a rudder. Currently, visual arts are whatever a parent, = teacher,=20 or student
          &nbs= p;   =20 thinks them to be. When the arts reach the level of a = discipline-based=20 scope and
          &nbs= p;    sequnce approach to learning, the general public will = then be able=20 to differentiate
          &nbs= p;    more=20 readily between art and craft.
 
          &nbs= p;   =20  We will continue to debate the merits of the = value of=20 visual arts training as long
          &nbs= p;   =20  as we continue to deny = children=20 exposure to the same learning sequences
          &nbs= p;   =20  we normally apply to the teaching of reading,writing, and=20 arithmetic.
 
          &nbs= p;     If=20 the visual arts continue to be introduced as novelty = projects,=20 the general public
        =    =20     will continue to view visual arts as a desparate = collection=20 of isolated variables that are
          &nbs= p;    =20 "fun" to do and apply to a rainy day activity not necessarily related = to=20 serious
          &nbs= p;    =20 academic studies. 
          &nbs= p;   =20
        =    =20       
 
        =    =20    
 
        =    =20    
 
 
          &nbs= p;    =20
 
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