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Lesson Plans


WHY JOHNNY CAN' DRAW...

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bob Beeching (robprod)
Sat, 17 Jul 1999 08:13:52 -0700


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drawing flies.

The reason why "Johnny Can't Draw" is simply because no one taught him =
how! It is incredible, that in the age of high tech and science, there =
are still those individuals out there who continue to cling desperately =
to the notion that the world is still flat!

With all the current biological information, beginning with the research =
on right/left brain activity, conducted by psychologist, Robert =
Ornstein's, and the more recent work of neurologist, Frank Wilson in =
1999, many elementary teacher candidates are still being taught that to =
teach young children to draw may inhibit the creative process. Let us =
attempt to dispel this erroneous supposition once and for all.

Children are born into this world ready to learn anything, in some =
instances, maybe not always well, but they can learn. As an example, let =
us focus on the skill of drawing.

Many Americans pride themselves on the notion: "I can't draw a straight =
line even if given a ruler." Give a No. 6 round watercolor brush to a =
Chinese or Japanese child of the age of eight, and that child will =
demonstrate a control and dexterity that would shame most American =
adults.

Give the same brush to an American second grader, and most like he or =
she will scrub with it. Asian children learn to draw remarkably well =
simply because their language communication skills relyon their ability =
to draw.

As both Ornstein and Wilson indicate in their research, if young =
children are not taught to visually discriminate between objects in =
their immediate environment, or learn eye/hand coordination skills early =
in their education, these abilities tend to become thwarted or lost =
altogether. Perhaps that is why so many elementary school teachers avoid =
the teaching of drawing skills to their students. But there is hope.

Using the research of Ornstein and his cohorts, Betty Edwards has =
experienced a degree of success in teaching drawing skills to adults =
through her book "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain." In the 1940s, =
Kimon Nicholaides's book "The Natural Way To Draw" expanded upon the =
1919-33 Bauhaus School of Design curriculum. In 1965, UCLA professor of =
art, Joseph Mugnaini, published "DRAWING: A Search for Form" expanded on =
the thesis that adults who come with a receptive attitude, time for =
practice, and a great deal of perseverance - can learn to draw!

Ask any practicing professional artist and he or she will tell you that, =
1) started at a young age; 2) kept practicing through adulthood, and, 3) =
uses these skills on a regular basis.

__________________________________rb

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drawing flies…

The reason why "Johnny Can't Draw" is simply because no one = taught him=20 how! It is incredible, that in the age of high tech and science, there = are still=20 those individuals out there who continue to cling desperately to the = notion that=20 the world is still flat!

With all the current biological information, beginning with the = research on=20 right/left brain activity, conducted by psychologist, Robert=20 Ornstein's, and the more recent work of neurologist, Frank Wilson = in=20 1999, many elementary  teacher candidates are still being = taught that=20 to teach young children to draw may inhibit the creative process. Let us = attempt=20 to dispel this erroneous supposition once and for all.

Children are born into this world ready to learn anything, in some = instances,=20 maybe not always well, but they can learn. As an example, let us focus = on the=20 skill of drawing.

 Many Americans pride themselves on the notion: = "I=20 can't draw a straight line even if given a ruler." Give a No. 6 = round=20 watercolor brush to a Chinese or Japanese child of the age of eight, and = that=20 child will demonstrate a control and dexterity that would shame most = American=20 adults.

 Give the same brush to an American second grader, and most like = he or=20 she will scrub with it. Asian children learn to draw remarkably well = simply=20 because their language communication skills relyon their ability to = draw.

As both Ornstein and Wilson indicate in their research, if young = children are=20 not taught to visually discriminate between objects in their immediate=20 environment, or learn eye/hand coordination skills early in their = education, these abilities tend to become thwarted or lost altogether. = Perhaps=20 that is why so many elementary school teachers avoid the teaching of = drawing=20 skills to their students. But there is hope.

Using the research of Ornstein and his cohorts, Betty Edwards has = experienced=20 a degree of success in teaching drawing skills to adults through her = book=20 "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain." In the = 1940s,=20 Kimon Nicholaides's book "The Natural Way To Draw" = expanded=20 upon the 1919-33 Bauhaus School of Design curriculum. In 1965, = UCLA=20 professor of art, Joseph Mugnaini, published "DRAWING: A Search = for Form"=20 expanded on the thesis that adults who come with a receptive = attitude,=20 time for practice, and a great deal of perseverance - can learn to = draw!

Ask any practicing professional artist and he or she will tell you = that, 1)=20 started at a young age; 2) kept practicing through adulthood, and, 3) = uses these=20 skills on a regular basis.

__________________________________rb

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