Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: A QUESTION OF HISTORY...

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
wduncan (wduncan)
Fri, 16 Jul 1999 16:49:47 -0500


--------------69939FBA77D2DB1CC68E39F4
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I believe the teaching of Reading, Writing and Arithmetic could well
benefit from a more well rounded, holistic approach in their delivery of
instruction. Today, the best art instruction is a balance, a mixture, a
blend of various components all hopefully delivered in a skillful mix,
not in unique segments. It was my junior year, in a high school French
class, where I truly realized why a verb existed. If students had
creative math instructors, like those who have students make up their
own systems of measurement, more students would excel in higher
mathematics. I had a bright student exclaim to me one day, she was
bewildered at my chart showing changes in Chinese characters over the
ages, that the english language didn't change like that. Something is
lacking in the other subject areas. Their focus is too narrow, they
insist on only teaching the basics, over and over until they bore young
minds to death. Why else would a student come back to me from her high
school science class to tell me that her teacher wanted to know what
business her middle school art teacher had in teaching her about right
and left brain hemisphere research. The rest of education needs to get
out from behind their desks and textbooks and start teaching.
Sorry for the lecture on the history of my
education, and my rambling, Woody

Bob Beeching wrote:

> RE: "Am I sacrificing the opportunity to foster creativeproblem
> solvers to teach them Art History? I know this sounds very
> Lowenfeldian, but I think we shouldall be asking ourselves this."
> Lowenfeld was a dear, but 180 degrees off about elementarylevels of
> visual arts instruction. As many others in his day, Lowenfeld was
> caught up in an antiquated view of educational psychology that
> promoted the use of art as therapy - not art as subject matter, i.e.
> as learning principles and elements of design. Answering a question
> with a question: How far would I get with the teaching of: reading,
> writing, and arithmeticif I placed only examples on the board, and
> spoke of only their
> histories?____________________________________________________________rb

--

This E-mail message is from Artist/Teacher Woody Duncan Rosedale Middle School in Kansas City, Kansas to see my beautiful grandkids Tim, Tess and Tiff click on http://www.taospaint.com/WEBpage4a.html to see my students working in the RMSartSTUDIO click on http://www.taospaint.com/RMSartSTUDIO.html to contact me via E-mail click on wduncan better yet visit my Web Site at http://www.taospaint.com

--------------69939FBA77D2DB1CC68E39F4 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> I believe the teaching of Reading, Writing and Arithmetic could well benefit from a more well rounded, holistic approach in their delivery of instruction.  Today, the best art instruction is a balance, a mixture, a blend of various components all hopefully delivered in a skillful mix, not in unique segments.  It was my junior year, in a high school French class, where I truly realized why a verb existed.  If students had creative math instructors, like those who have students make up their own systems of measurement, more students would excel in higher mathematics.  I had a bright student exclaim to me one day, she was bewildered at my chart showing changes in Chinese characters over the ages, that the english language didn't change like that.  Something is lacking in the other subject areas.  Their focus is too narrow, they insist on only teaching the basics, over and over until they bore young minds to death.  Why else would a student come back to me from her high school science class to tell me that her teacher wanted to know what business her middle school art teacher had in teaching her about right and left brain hemisphere research.  The rest of education needs to get out from behind their desks and textbooks and start teaching.
                    Sorry for the lecture on the history of my education, and my rambling, Woody

Bob Beeching wrote:

RE: "Am I sacrificing the opportunity to foster creativeproblem solvers to teach them Art History? I know this sounds very Lowenfeldian,  but I think we shouldall be asking ourselves this." Lowenfeld was a dear, but 180 degrees off about elementarylevels of visual arts instruction.  As many  others in his  day, Lowenfeld was caught up in an antiquated view of educational psychology that promoted the use of art as therapy - not art as subject matter, i.e. as learning principles and elements of design. Answering a question with a question: How far would I get with the teaching of: reading, writing, and arithmeticif I placed only examples on the board, and spoke of only their histories?____________________________________________________________rb
--
 

This E-mail message is from Artist/Teacher Woody Duncan
             Rosedale Middle School in Kansas City, Kansas
   to see my beautiful grandkids Tim, Tess and Tiff click on
             http://www.taospaint.com/WEBpage4a.html
 to see my students working in the RMSartSTUDIO click on
           http://www.taospaint.com/RMSartSTUDIO.html
                                        to contact me via E-mail
                         click on wduncan
 better yet visit my Web Site at http://www.taospaint.com
 

--------------69939FBA77D2DB1CC68E39F4--