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Lesson Plans


readiness to learn

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Linda Kelty (lckelty)
Fri, 16 Jul 1999 09:09:55 -0400


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I'm on another list for my graduate classes and I thought some of you might
be interested in this report on the indicators of children's readiness to
learn. After the Getty discussion of shoe tying, I thought some of you
might find this interesting. Linda K.
* About 12% of children ages 5 to 17 have difficulty performing
one or more everyday activities, including learning,
communication, mobility, & self-care. Difficulty with
learning is the most common of these four types of
limitations. Children in families with lower socioeconomic
status are at greater risk than other children of having
difficulty performing everyday activities.

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Hi
How are kids are different today than in the days when we went to school.
JCBQ

Highlights from "America's Children: Key
National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999."
Produced by the Federal Interagency Forum
on Child & Family Statistics. July 8, 1999
==========================================

"America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999"
is the third annual report to the Nation on the condition of our
most precious resource, our children. Included are six contextual
measures that describe the changing population and family context
in which children are living, and 23 indicators of well-being in
the areas of economic security, health, behavior and social
environment, and education. This year, a special feature is
presented on Children Who Have Difficulty Performing Everyday
Activities.

Part 1: Population & Family Characteristics
===========================================

* America's children continue to grow in racial & ethnic
diversity. In 1998, 65% were white, non-Hispanic; 15% were
black, non-Hispanic; 15% were Hispanic; 4% were Asian/Pacific
Islander; & 1% were American Indian/Alaska Native. Hispanic
children slightly outnumber black, non-Hispanic children.

* The percentage of children living with two parents declined
from 77% in 1980 to 68% in 1996, & has remained stable since
then. There are large differences across racial & ethnic
groups, however. In 1998, 76% of white, non-Hispanic children
lived with two parents, compared to 36% of black children &
64% of Hispanic children.

* The percentage of births that are to unmarried women
stabilized since 1994 at about 32%, after rising sharply from
18% in 1980.

Part II: Indicators of Children's Well-Being
============================================

Economic Security Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The poverty rate of children was at 19% in 1997, about the
same as it has been since 1980. The proportion of children
living in families with high income increased from 17% in 1980
to 25% in 1997, while the proportion of children living in
extreme poverty grew slightly from 7 to 8% over the same
period. These shifts reflect a growing income disparity among
children.

* The percentage of children living with their parents who had
at least one parent working full time all year increased 5
percentage points to 76% from 1993 to 1997. A large share of
this increase was due to the increase in the percentage of
children living with employed single mothers, which increased
from 33% in 1993 to 41% in 1997.

* Most American children & adolescents had a diet that was poor
or needed improvement in 1996. As children get older, the
quality of their diet declines: 24% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a
good diet, compared with only 6% of teenagers ages 13 to 18.

* Teenagers are also less likely than younger children to have a
usual source of medical care. In 1996, 8% of all adolescents
ages 12 to 17 lacked a usual source of care. Over 27% of
uninsured adolescents in this age group lacked a usual source
of care.

Health Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The percentage of infants born with low birthweight (weighing
less than about 5 1/2 lbs.) continues to rise. In 1997, this
percentage was the highest in over 20 years, at 7.5%. The
increase in low birthweight is partly due to the rising number
of twin & other multiple births.

* The percentage of children in families living in poverty who
have received the combined series of vaccines has increased
between 1996 & 1997, from 69 to 71%.

* While the mortality rate for almost all groups of children
continues to fall, it has fallen most dramatically among black
children ages 1 to 4, from 67.6 per 100,000 in 1996 to 59.2 in
1997, according to preliminary data. This rate, however,
remains almost twice the rate for whites, at 31.5 per 100,000
according to 1997 preliminary data.

* Death rates among adolescents, particularly among black males,
have dropped dramatically after rising rapidly during the
early 1990s. In 1996, the adolescent firearm mortality rate
was at the lowest point since 1989 for both blacks & whites.
The rate among black males dropped from 120.3 per 100,000 in
1995 to 108.7 in 1996, & the rate among white males dropped
from 27.9 per 100,000 in 1995 to 23.1 in 1996.

* The birth rate for teenagers ages 15 to 17 dropped from 1991
to 1997, after rising during the late 1980s. In 1997, the
rate was 32.1 live births per 1,000 females ages 15 to 17,
down from 38.7 in 1991.

Behavior & Social Environment Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The percentage of 10th- & 12th-grade students who reported
smoking daily dropped in 1998 after generally increasing since
1992. Among 10th-graders, the percentage dropped from 18% in
1997 to 16% in 1998, & among 12th-graders it dropped from its
recent high of 25% in 1997 to 22% in 1998. This rate is still
high compared to previous years, however.

* Youth ages 12 to 17 were victims of serious violent crime at
the rate of 27 crimes per 1,000 in 1997, down from 44 per
1,000 in 1993. Juveniles were identified as perpetrators of
serious violent crimes at the rate of 31 crimes per 1,000 in
1997, down from 52 per 1,000 in 1993.

Education Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* A higher percentage of children were enrolled in preschool in
1997 than in 1996 -- 48% compared to 45%. Preschool
enrollment particularly increased among black, non-Hispanic
children, from 45 to 55%, & among children living in poverty,
from 34 to 40%.

* In 1998, about 8% of the Nation's 16- to 19-year-olds were
neither enrolled in school nor working, a significant decrease
from 9% in 1997.

Special Feature
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* About 12% of children ages 5 to 17 have difficulty performing
one or more everyday activities, including learning,
communication, mobility, & self-care. Difficulty with
learning is the most common of these four types of
limitations. Children in families with lower socioeconomic
status are at greater risk than other children of having
difficulty performing everyday activities.



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From: "Kickbush, Peter" <Peter_Kickbush>
To: "Information from & about the U.S. Department of Education publications & more ."
<edinfo>
Subject: "America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999"
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 1999 14:55:18 -0400
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"AMERICA'S CHILDREN: Key National Indicators of Well-Being,
1999" was released yesterday. It's the third annual report on
the condition of America's children.

Below is an excerpt from the "hightlights" section of the
report. The full report is at:
http://childstats.gov/ac1999/toc.asp

========================================
Highlights from "America's Children: Key
National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999."
Produced by the Federal Interagency Forum
on Child & Family Statistics. July 8, 1999
==========================================

"America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 1999"
is the third annual report to the Nation on the condition of our
most precious resource, our children. Included are six contextual
measures that describe the changing population and family context
in which children are living, and 23 indicators of well-being in
the areas of economic security, health, behavior and social
environment, and education. This year, a special feature is
presented on Children Who Have Difficulty Performing Everyday
Activities.

Part 1: Population & Family Characteristics
===========================================

* America's children continue to grow in racial & ethnic
diversity. In 1998, 65% were white, non-Hispanic; 15% were
black, non-Hispanic; 15% were Hispanic; 4% were Asian/Pacific
Islander; & 1% were American Indian/Alaska Native. Hispanic
children slightly outnumber black, non-Hispanic children.

* The percentage of children living with two parents declined
from 77% in 1980 to 68% in 1996, & has remained stable since
then. There are large differences across racial & ethnic
groups, however. In 1998, 76% of white, non-Hispanic children
lived with two parents, compared to 36% of black children &
64% of Hispanic children.

* The percentage of births that are to unmarried women
stabilized since 1994 at about 32%, after rising sharply from
18% in 1980.

Part II: Indicators of Children's Well-Being
============================================

Economic Security Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The poverty rate of children was at 19% in 1997, about the
same as it has been since 1980. The proportion of children
living in families with high income increased from 17% in 1980
to 25% in 1997, while the proportion of children living in
extreme poverty grew slightly from 7 to 8% over the same
period. These shifts reflect a growing income disparity among
children.

* The percentage of children living with their parents who had
at least one parent working full time all year increased 5
percentage points to 76% from 1993 to 1997. A large share of
this increase was due to the increase in the percentage of
children living with employed single mothers, which increased
from 33% in 1993 to 41% in 1997.

* Most American children & adolescents had a diet that was poor
or needed improvement in 1996. As children get older, the
quality of their diet declines: 24% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a
good diet, compared with only 6% of teenagers ages 13 to 18.

* Teenagers are also less likely than younger children to have a
usual source of medical care. In 1996, 8% of all adolescents
ages 12 to 17 lacked a usual source of care. Over 27% of
uninsured adolescents in this age group lacked a usual source
of care.

Health Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The percentage of infants born with low birthweight (weighing
less than about 5 1/2 lbs.) continues to rise. In 1997, this
percentage was the highest in over 20 years, at 7.5%. The
increase in low birthweight is partly due to the rising number
of twin & other multiple births.

* The percentage of children in families living in poverty who
have received the combined series of vaccines has increased
between 1996 & 1997, from 69 to 71%.

* While the mortality rate for almost all groups of children
continues to fall, it has fallen most dramatically among black
children ages 1 to 4, from 67.6 per 100,000 in 1996 to 59.2 in
1997, according to preliminary data. This rate, however,
remains almost twice the rate for whites, at 31.5 per 100,000
according to 1997 preliminary data.

* Death rates among adolescents, particularly among black males,
have dropped dramatically after rising rapidly during the
early 1990s. In 1996, the adolescent firearm mortality rate
was at the lowest point since 1989 for both blacks & whites.
The rate among black males dropped from 120.3 per 100,000 in
1995 to 108.7 in 1996, & the rate among white males dropped
from 27.9 per 100,000 in 1995 to 23.1 in 1996.

* The birth rate for teenagers ages 15 to 17 dropped from 1991
to 1997, after rising during the late 1980s. In 1997, the
rate was 32.1 live births per 1,000 females ages 15 to 17,
down from 38.7 in 1991.

Behavior & Social Environment Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* The percentage of 10th- & 12th-grade students who reported
smoking daily dropped in 1998 after generally increasing since
1992. Among 10th-graders, the percentage dropped from 18% in
1997 to 16% in 1998, & among 12th-graders it dropped from its
recent high of 25% in 1997 to 22% in 1998. This rate is still
high compared to previous years, however.

* Youth ages 12 to 17 were victims of serious violent crime at
the rate of 27 crimes per 1,000 in 1997, down from 44 per
1,000 in 1993. Juveniles were identified as perpetrators of
serious violent crimes at the rate of 31 crimes per 1,000 in
1997, down from 52 per 1,000 in 1993.

Education Indicators
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* A higher percentage of children were enrolled in preschool in
1997 than in 1996 -- 48% compared to 45%. Preschool
enrollment particularly increased among black, non-Hispanic
children, from 45 to 55%, & among children living in poverty,
from 34 to 40%.

* In 1998, about 8% of the Nation's 16- to 19-year-olds were
neither enrolled in school nor working, a significant decrease
from 9% in 1997.

Special Feature
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* About 12% of children ages 5 to 17 have difficulty performing
one or more everyday activities, including learning,
communication, mobility, & self-care. Difficulty with
learning is the most common of these four types of
limitations. Children in families with lower socioeconomic
status are at greater risk than other children of having
difficulty performing everyday activities.

===========================================================
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U.S. Department of Education
peter_kickbush

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