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Lesson Plans


value of art

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Linda Kelty (lckelty)
Fri, 2 Jul 1999 21:11:29 -0400


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Dear Colleagues, This is merely a compilation of the wonderful responses =
you've all shared on the value of art. I hope I got them all. We will =
add to and update this as often as possible. If you discover anything =
new, please post it. This should be of benefit to all of us. My friend =
has discovered some great articles and will be sharing them with me to =
share with you. She is grateful for your help. Right now she has to =
attend classes and write three chapters in three weeks so we'll have to =
wait for a bit. Linda
Excerpt of Henry Taylor's posting.

A Sacred Unity: Further Steps to an Ecology of Mind
Gregory Bateson --edited by Rodney E. Donaldson
This is the most concise resource from Bateson but his other books =
shouldn't be missed. A very useful understanding of aesthetics can also =
be gained here.
=20
Bateson is probably the richest starting point because there are so many =
little bits to find. Most of the other books in my collection each might =
yield a chapter of valuable data at best, more often than not, only a =
paragraph or two. After half a dozen years those little paragraphs seem =
to pop up everywhere but they are still so disconnected nd disparate as =
to defy collation.
;-)
=20
Search on the web and in indexes for:
perception, difference, discrimination of difference, distinction of =
difference. aesthetics, bioaesthetics, Gregory Bateson, context, =
education and epistmology, epistemology, ontology, play, the sacred, =
systems theory, Weber, Fechner, Weber-Fechner, Douglas Hofstadter.
=20

These were submitted by the staff of the Eric database. An
>Other Websites of Possible Interest:
>Winning Support for Art Education
>http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/Advocacy/
>
>Research in Arts Education: The Necessity and the Challenge
>http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/notes/97_3/welcome.html
>

For your summer perusal - This site is directed towards college teaching =
but
it has some fine articles on "first day", etc., and web resources.
http://www.cte.iastate.edu/tips.html#menu

same site - but on writing a teaching philosophy
http://www.cte.iastate.edu/tips/philosophy.html

I couldn't get into the Vision & Art site posted earlier (could you?)
and sent a message to the administrator. This site was posted
earlier--it's Eyes on Art, alive and well w/ teacher's manual:

http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/art/art.html

Best wishes,
Joseph
>Meeting the Arts Standards and Preparing for Work in the 21st Century
>http://www.winternet.com/~maae/scans.html
>
>National Art Education Association
>http://www.naea-reston.org/index.html
>
>The Value of Music Education
>http://www.pionet.net/~hub7/valuetext.html
>
>Literacy and Illiteracy in the USA
>http://www.indiana.edu/~eric_rec/ieo/bibs/litcy-us.html
>
>National Institute of Literacy
>http://novel.nifl.gov/
>
>ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading, English, and Communication
>http://www.indiana.edu/~eric_rec
>
>Whole Language Umbrella
>http://www.edu.yorku.ca/~wlu/wlu_home.htm
>

http://forum.swarthmore.edu/sum95/suzanne/links.html
http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/RR/database/RR.09.96/archamb1.html
http://library.advanced.org/16661/escher/tessellations.1.html
web.inter.nl.net/hcc/Hans.Kuiper/index.html

East Carolina has a website dedicated to math & art ( =
www.ecu.edu/art/2ae.htm ). Look for "Math/Art Project" and go from =
there. =20

>National Council of Teachers of English
>http://www.ncte.org/
>
>International Reading Association
>http://www.eden.com/~readthis/ira/default.htm
>

Mind Over Matter
Why the Arts Are Important to Science
by K.C. Cole, Science Writer, Los Angeles Times,
August 13, 1998

What's art got to do with it? A lot more than people
generally think. To educators fighting over school budgets,
art and music frequently are viewed as frills that drain
funds from more serious subjects like math and science.
But scientists and mathematicians know different. In fact,
they often rely on aesthetics to guide their research, filter
their perceptions and help them visualize patterns in the
sometimes inpenetrable chaos of data.

That's why recent moves by Los Angeles and Orange
counties to put the arts back into the schools is such good
news for science education. Among the children who will
benefit most are the future scientists and mathematicians--
and the people who come to use their discoveries and
inventions. Artistic training can sometimes play a critical
role in scientific success.

Of course, scientists have long said that the best of their
breed are artistically inclined. Most everyone has seen
photos of Einstein with his violin and physicist Richard
Feynman with his bongos. I've sat next to physicist Frank
Wilczek while he played silent Bach piano concertos on his
knees during professional talks. Nobel Prize-winning
chemist Roald Hoffmann writes highly praised poetry
(only sometimes about molecules).

Put four mathematicians in a room, the old saying goes,
and you're sure to have a string quartet. In fact, artistically
inclined scientists tend to win more awards than their less
diversified colleagues, according to several studies.
Michigan State University physiologist Robert
Root-Bernstein and his psychologist mother, Maurine
Bernstein, found that most Nobel Prize winners and
members of the National Academy of Sciences had arts-
related hobbies.

"Their less successful colleagues did not share either their
arts interests or their arts-related thinking skills," the
authors concluded. This finding, replicated in several
similar studies, seems a logical extension of other research
conducted at UC Irvine suggesting that exposure to music
actually enhances intellectual ability. Not only does
listening to Mozart improve test performance (at least
temporarily), preschoolers who play piano do better at
science and math than their counterparts who don't.

Why should this be so? Why should painting or playing
piano or writing poetry have anything to do with math or
science? One obvious reason is that scientists, like artists,
must learn to pay close attention--both to detail and to the
broader context. Scientists, like artists, are people who
notice things. They not only see things that other people
often ignore, they also see the frequently hidden links
among disparate aspects of reality.

Scientists and engineers, like Root-Bernstein, "must learn
to observe as acutely as artists and to visualize things in
their minds as concretely. They must learn to recognize
and invent patterns like composers or poets--and play
their high-tech instruments with the same virtuosity as
musical performers."

Another art-science connection may lie in the relationship
between our hands and our brains. A new book by
California neurologist Frank Wilson, "The Hand: How It
Shapes the Brain, Language, and Culture," argues that
people who use their hands are privy to a way of knowing
about the world inaccessible to those not schooled in
manual arts.

Speaking on National Public Radio's "All Things
Considered" recently, Wilson told of a car mechanic who
got a call from a vice president at a big computer company,
complaining that his MIT-educated engineers couldn't
solve problems as well as the older engineers at the
company. It turned out, Wilson said, that 70% of older
engineers fixed their cars, and 20% had some experience
with wrenches. Of the young hotshots, none had ever
held a wrench. As a result, they weren't as good at
understanding complex systems.

The hand's knowledge about the world, according to
Wilson, actually teaches the brain new tricks. The hands
touching, exploring, and manipulating can rewire the
brain's neural circuitry.

Finally, logic alone is sometimes insufficient to solve really
complex problems. Even Einstein said that imagination
was more important to a scientist than knowledge.
Physicists on the forefront of discovery often talk about
being guided by "smell" or instinct. They talk about the
"aesthetic" appeal of ideas. According to French physicist
Henry Poincare, aesthetics was "a delicate sieve" that
helped scientists sort through the confusion of facts and
theories. The physicist P.A.M. Dirac observed: "It is
more important to have beauty in one's equations than to
have them fit experiments."

Painting, piano playing, and poetry help put things in
context, sharpen details, hone observations. They sort the
essential from the peripheral, forge connections, find
patterns and discover new ways of seeing familiar things.
These are exactly the tools any good scientist needs.

Elliot Eisner's "The Kind of Schools We Need" which is composed of
his essays, one of which is entitled "Does Experience in the Arts Boost
Academic Achievement." you can find out about this book at:
http://www.HEINEMANN.com/code/template.ghc?direct=3Dsearch_titles&dw=3Dvi=
ew&book_id=3D1577

Sharon,
If you are looking for a book, a great resource is The Arts as Meaning=20
Makers: Integrating Literature and the Arts Throughout the Curriculum. =
by=20
Claudia E. Cornett 1999 Prentice Hall. I got it through Amazon.com. In =
the=20
introduction chapter it cover teaching with, about and through the arts. =
It=20
also gives a rationale for the importance of art in academics. The book =
does=20
not only cover visual art, it also includes music, drama, dance and =
movement.
If you are looking for an institution, Lesley College in Cambridge has a =

graduate program that specializes in Creative Arts in Learning. The =
courses=20
include visual art, storytelling, music, drama and movement. You might =
be=20
able to get some information to support your research through this =
college.
I just remembered another great book: Arts and Learning by Merryl =
Goldberg. =20
More info on using art in an academic setting. I really liked this book =
as=20
well.

hi,
=20
check out this website from ntieva : =
http://www.art.unt.edu/ntieva/artcurr/integ/why.htm
=20
LOTS of interesting stuff!
=20
also, it might be fruitful to research the connections between imagery =
and learning; see some of these for more info:
=20
http://www.u.arizona.edu/~bettsj/SemTrans.html
=20
http://www.slc.edu/pages/ebj/minds/student_pages/adrian/index.html
=20
http://www.as.ua.edu/psychology/cognitive/imagery.htm
=20

:)wendy

I am responding to message from:
>Date: Wed, 30 Jun 1999 13:56:08 -0400
>From: "Linda Kelty" <lckelty>
>Subject: value of art in academics

I have a copy of a research report on out-of-school art bases programs =
that
says:
". . . young people working in the arts during their out-of-school hours =
are:
* Four time more likely to have won school-wide attention for the =
academic
achievement.
* Being elected to class office within their schools more than three =
times
as often.
* Four times more likely to participate in a math and science fair.
* Three times more likely to win an award for school attendance.
* Over four times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or =
poem."

These results were not true for just any kind of program but they were =
true
if the out-of-school programs achieved high levels of participation,
practice, critique, and performance.=20

The above quote is from: "LIVING THE ARTS THROUGH LANGUAGE+LEANING a =
report
on community based youth organizations" by Shirley Brice Heath, et.al. =
in
AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS MONOGRAPHS, November, 1998, vol 2, number 7.

I believe copies are available from The Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching, 555 Middle field Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 * =
phone
650-566-5100 or fax 650-326-0278

High correlations such as these do not always prove that the arts were
instrumental in causing better academic work. It is possible that those
youth who were already good students were also the ones electing to =
become
involved in the arts programs. Correlations to not prove cause, but they =
do
suggest the possibility of cause. They can be reason enough to encourage
another study designed to establish that good arts programs do cause =
better
academic performance.

Marvin Bartel
***********************************************
Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art
Goshen College, 1700 South Main St., Goshen IN 46526
Office (219) 535-7592 Fax (219)535-7660
Studio (219) 533-0171
***********************************************
My October, 98 exhibition:=20
http://www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/10-98p1.htm
Fax (219) 535-7660
e-mail marvinpb=20
http://www.goshen.edu/art/
***************************
http://www.bartelart.com/acorn.htm
"Plant trees. It's a good thing."

This was our website for the 1998/1999 Math Art Project. Amber Oakes =
(who=20
just joined our group- welcome Amber!) and I are finishing up this =
year's=20
site and it will be up soon. It's much more resource-oriented and it's =
got=20
great links. We'll be sure to post the site when we're finished.

Joy wrote "East Carolina has a website dedicated to math & art (=20
www.ecu.edu/art/2ae.htm ). Look for 'Math/Art Project' and go from =
there."

Michelle H. Harrell
mmhar
North Garner Middle School
Garner, North Carolina
_____
/ \
( ) "Leonardo da Vinci's best pictures have been
! ^ ^ ! destroyed. They still live.
^! * * ! ^ An idea of genius never dies."
! \ ^ / ! -Edvard Munch
( ( 0 ) ) 1929
\ --- /
\ ! ! /

_______________________________________________________________
Get Free Email and Do More On The Web. Visit http://www.msn.com

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Dear=20 Colleagues, This is merely a compilation of the wonderful responses = you've all=20 shared on the value of art. I hope I got them all.  We will add to = and=20 update this as often as possible.  If you discover anything new, = please=20 post it. This should be of benefit to all of us.  My friend has = discovered=20 some great articles and will be sharing them with me to share with = you. =20 She is grateful for your help. Right now she has to attend classes and = write=20 three chapters in three weeks so we'll have to wait for a bit. =20 Linda
Excerpt=20 of Henry Taylor's posting.
 
A Sacred Unity: Further Steps to an Ecology of=20 Mind
Gregory Bateson = --edited by Rodney=20 E. Donaldson
This is the most concise resource from Bateson but = his other=20 books shouldn't be missed. A very useful understanding of aesthetics can = also be=20 gained here.
 
Bateson is probably the richest = starting point=20 because there are so many little bits to find. Most of the other books = in my=20 collection each might yield a chapter of valuable data at best, more = often than=20 not, only a paragraph or two. After half a dozen years those little = paragraphs=20 seem to pop up everywhere but they are still so disconnected nd = disparate as to=20 defy collation.
 ;-)
 
Search on the web and in indexes for:
 perception, difference, discrimination of = difference,=20 distinction of difference. aesthetics, bioaesthetics, Gregory Bateson, = context,=20 education and epistmology, epistemology, ontology,  play, the = sacred,=20 systems theory, Weber, Fechner, Weber-Fechner, Douglas = Hofstadter.
 
 
These were submitted by the staff of the Eric database. =20 An
>Other Websites of Possible Interest:
>Winning Support = for Art=20 Education
>http://www.ar= tsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/Advocacy/
>
>Research=20 in Arts Education: The Necessity and the Challenge
>http://www.sd= coe.k12.ca.us/notes/97_3/welcome.html
>
 
For your summer perusal - This site is directed towards college = teaching=20 but
it has some fine articles on "first day", etc., and web = resources.
http://www.cte.iastate= .edu/tips.html#menu

same=20 site - but on writing a teaching philosophy
http://www.cte.i= astate.edu/tips/philosophy.html
 
 
 
I couldn't get into the Vision & Art site posted earlier (could = you?)
and sent a message to the administrator.  This site was=20 posted
earlier--it's Eyes on Art, alive and well w/ teacher's=20 manual:

http://www.kn.pacbe= ll.com/wired/art/art.html

Best=20 wishes,
Joseph
>Meeting the Arts Standards and Preparing for = Work in=20 the 21st Century
>http://www.winternet.c= om/~maae/scans.html
>
>National=20 Art Education Association
>http://www.naea-reston.org= /index.html
>
>The=20 Value of Music Education
>http://www.pionet.net= /~hub7/valuetext.html
>
>Literacy=20 and Illiteracy in the USA
>http://w= ww.indiana.edu/~eric_rec/ieo/bibs/litcy-us.html
>
>Nation= al=20 Institute of Literacy
>http://novel.nifl.gov/
>
>= ;ERIC=20 Clearinghouse on Reading, English, and Communication
>http://www.indiana.edu/~eric_re= c
>
>Whole=20 Language Umbrella
>http://www.edu.yorku.c= a/~wlu/wlu_home.htm
>
 

http://foru= m.swarthmore.edu/sum95/suzanne/links.html
http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/RR/database/RR.09.96/archamb1.html
= ht= tp://library.advanced.org/16661/escher/tessellations.1.html
web.in= ter.nl.net/hcc/Hans.Kuiper/index.html
 
 
East Carolina has a website dedicated to math & = art ( www.ecu.edu/art/2ae.htm = ).  Look=20 for "Math/Art Project" and go from there. =20


>National Council of Teachers of = English
>http://www.ncte.org/
>
>Int= ernational=20 Reading Association
>http://www.eden.co= m/~readthis/ira/default.htm
>
 

Mind Over Matter
Why the Arts Are Important to = Science
  by=20 K.C. Cole, Science Writer, Los Angeles Times,
   August 13, = 1998

What's art got to do with it?  A lot more than=20 people
generally think.  To educators fighting over school=20 budgets,
art and music frequently are viewed as frills that = drain
funds=20 from more serious subjects like math and science.
But scientists and=20 mathematicians know different.  In fact,
they often rely on = aesthetics=20 to guide their research, filter
their perceptions and help them = visualize=20 patterns in the
sometimes inpenetrable chaos of data.

That's = why=20 recent moves by Los Angeles and Orange
counties to put the arts back = into the=20 schools is such good
news for science education.  Among the = children who=20 will
benefit most are the future scientists and = mathematicians--
and the=20 people who come to use their discoveries and
inventions.  = Artistic=20 training can sometimes play a critical
role in scientific = success.

Of=20 course, scientists have long said that the best of their
breed are=20 artistically inclined.  Most everyone has seen
photos of = Einstein with=20 his violin and physicist Richard
Feynman with his bongos.  I've = sat next=20 to physicist Frank
Wilczek while he played silent Bach piano = concertos on=20 his
knees during professional talks.  Nobel = Prize-winning
chemist=20 Roald Hoffmann writes highly praised poetry
(only sometimes about=20 molecules).

Put four mathematicians in a room, the old saying=20 goes,
and you're sure to have a string quartet.  In fact,=20 artistically
inclined scientists tend to win more awards than their=20 less
diversified colleagues, according to several = studies.
Michigan State=20 University physiologist Robert
Root-Bernstein and his psychologist = mother,=20 Maurine
Bernstein, found that most Nobel Prize winners and
members = of the=20 National Academy of Sciences had arts-
related = hobbies.

"Their=20 less successful colleagues did not share either their
arts interests = or their=20 arts-related thinking skills," the
authors concluded.  This = finding, replicated in several
similar studies, seems a logical = extension of=20 other research
conducted at UC Irvine suggesting that exposure to=20 music
actually enhances intellectual ability.  Not only=20 does
listening to Mozart improve test performance (at = least
temporarily),=20 preschoolers who play piano do better at
science and math than their=20 counterparts who don't.

Why should this be so?  Why should = painting=20 or playing
piano or writing poetry have anything to do with math=20 or
science?  One obvious reason is that scientists, like=20 artists,
must learn to pay close attention--both to detail and to=20 the
broader context.  Scientists, like artists, are people = who
notice=20 things.  They not only see things that other people
often = ignore, they=20 also see the frequently hidden links
among disparate aspects of=20 reality.

Scientists and engineers, like Root-Bernstein, = "must=20 learn
to observe as acutely as artists and to visualize things = in
their=20 minds as concretely.  They must learn to recognize
and invent = patterns=20 like composers or poets--and play
their high-tech instruments with = the same=20 virtuosity as
musical performers."

Another art-science = connection=20 may lie in the relationship
between our hands and our brains.  A = new=20 book by
California neurologist Frank Wilson, "The Hand: How = It
Shapes=20 the Brain, Language, and Culture," argues that
people who use = their=20 hands are privy to a way of knowing
about the world inaccessible to = those not=20 schooled in
manual arts.

Speaking on National Public Radio's = "All=20 Things
Considered" recently, Wilson told of a car mechanic = who
got a=20 call from a vice president at a big computer company,
complaining = that his=20 MIT-educated engineers couldn't
solve problems as well as the older = engineers=20 at the
company.  It turned out, Wilson said, that 70% of=20 older
engineers fixed their cars, and 20% had some experience
with = wrenches.  Of the young hotshots, none had ever
held a = wrench.  As=20 a result, they weren't as good at
understanding complex = systems.

The=20 hand's knowledge about the world, according to
Wilson, actually = teaches the=20 brain new tricks.  The hands
touching, exploring, and = manipulating can=20 rewire the
brain's neural circuitry.

Finally, logic alone is = sometimes=20 insufficient to solve really
complex problems.  Even Einstein = said that=20 imagination
was more important to a scientist than = knowledge.
Physicists=20 on the forefront of discovery often talk about
being guided by=20 "smell" or instinct.  They talk about=20 the
"aesthetic" appeal of ideas.  According to French=20 physicist
Henry Poincare, aesthetics was "a delicate sieve" = that
helped scientists sort through the confusion of facts=20 and
theories.  The physicist P.A.M. Dirac observed:  = "It=20 is
more important to have beauty in one's equations than to
have = them fit=20 experiments."

Painting, piano playing, and poetry help put = things=20 in
context, sharpen details, hone observations.  They sort=20 the
essential from the peripheral, forge connections, = find
patterns and=20 discover new ways of seeing familiar things.
These are exactly the = tools any=20 good scientist needs.

 
Elliot Eisner's "The Kind of Schools We Need" which is = composed=20 of
his essays, one of which is entitled "Does Experience in the = Arts=20 Boost
Academic Achievement."  you can find out about this = book=20 at:
http://www.HEINEMANN.com/code/template.ghc?dir= ect=3Dsearch_titles&dw=3Dview&book_id=3D1577

Sharon,If=20 you are looking for a book, a great resource is The Arts as Meaning =
Makers:=20 Integrating Literature and the Arts Throughout the Curriculum. by =
Claudia E.=20 Cornett 1999 Prentice Hall.  I got it through Amazon.com.  In = the=20
introduction chapter it cover teaching with, about and through the=20 arts.  It
also gives a rationale for the importance of art in=20 academics.  The book does
not only cover visual art, it also = includes=20 music, drama, dance and movement.
If you are looking for an = institution,=20 Lesley College in Cambridge has a
graduate program that specializes = in=20 Creative Arts in Learning.  The courses
include visual art,=20 storytelling, music, drama and movement.  You might be
able to = get some=20 information to support your research through this college.
I just = remembered=20 another great book: Arts and Learning by Merryl Goldberg. 
More = info on=20 using art in an academic setting.  I really liked this book as=20
well.


hi,
 
check out this website from ntieva = :  http://www.a= rt.unt.edu/ntieva/artcurr/integ/why.htm
 
LOTS of interesting = stuff!
 
also, it might be fruitful to research the = connections between=20 imagery and learning; see some of these for more info:
 
http://www.u.ariz= ona.edu/~bettsj/SemTrans.html
 
http://www.slc.edu/pages/ebj/minds/student_pages/adrian/index.html=
 
http://www= .as.ua.edu/psychology/cognitive/imagery.htm
 
 
:)wendy
 
I am responding to message = from:
>Date:=20 Wed, 30 Jun 1999 13:56:08 -0400
>From: "Linda Kelty" = <lckelty>
>= Subject:=20 value of art in academics

I have a copy of a research report on=20 out-of-school art bases programs that
says:
". . . young = people=20 working in the arts during their out-of-school hours are:
* Four time = more=20 likely to have won school-wide attention for the = academic
achievement.
*=20 Being elected to class office within their schools more than three = times
as=20 often.
* Four times more likely to participate in a math and science=20 fair.
* Three times more likely to win an award for school = attendance.
*=20 Over four times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or=20 poem."

These results were not true for just any kind of = program but=20 they were true
if the out-of-school programs achieved high levels of=20 participation,
practice, critique, and performance.

The above = quote=20 is from: "LIVING THE ARTS THROUGH LANGUAGE+LEANING a report
on = community=20 based youth organizations" by Shirley Brice Heath, et.al. = in
AMERICANS=20 FOR THE ARTS MONOGRAPHS, November, 1998, vol 2, number 7.

I = believe=20 copies are available from The Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement = of=20 Teaching, 555 Middle field Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 * = phone
650-566-5100 or=20 fax 650-326-0278

High correlations such as these do not always = prove that=20 the arts were
instrumental in causing better academic work. It is = possible=20 that those
youth who were already good students were also the ones = electing=20 to become
involved in the arts programs. Correlations to not prove = cause, but=20 they do
suggest the possibility of cause. They can be reason enough = to=20 encourage
another study designed to establish that good arts programs = do=20 cause better
academic performance.

Marvin=20 Bartel
***********************************************
Marvin = Bartel,=20 Ed.D., Professor of Art
Goshen College, 1700 South Main St., Goshen = IN=20 46526
Office (219) 535-7592 Fax (219)535-7660
Studio (219)=20 533-0171
***********************************************
My = October, 98=20 exhibition:
http://www.goshen.ed= u/~marvinpb/10-98p1.htm
Fax   =20 (219) 535-7660
e-mail marvinpb
http://www.goshen.edu/art/
***= ************************
http://www.bartelart.com/acor= n.htm
"Plant=20 trees. It's a good thing."

This was our website for the = 1998/1999=20 Math Art Project.  Amber Oakes (who
just joined our group- = welcome=20 Amber!) and I are finishing up this year's
site and it will be up = soon. It's=20 much more resource-oriented and it's got
great links. We'll be sure = to post=20 the site when we're finished.

Joy wrote "East Carolina has a = website=20 dedicated to math & art (
www.ecu.edu/art/2ae.htm = ).  Look=20 for 'Math/Art Project' and go from there."

Michelle H. = Harrell
mmhar
North Garner = Middle=20 School
Garner, North Carolina
     =20 _____
     /    = \
   =20 (      )   "Leonardo da Vinci's = best=20 pictures have been
    ! ^  ^ !    = destroyed. They still live.
   ^! *  * ! ^   = An idea=20 of genius never dies."
   ! \  ^  /=20 !            =             &= nbsp;    =20 -Edvard Munch
   (  ( 0 ) =20 )            =             &= nbsp;     =20 1929
    \  ---  = /
     \ ! !=20 /


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