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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #863

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
George Martin Rex (grex)
Fri, 31 Jul 1998 13:30:39 +0500


On 31-Jul-98, artsednet-digest wrote:

>artsednet-digest Friday, July 31 1998 Volume 02 : Number 863

>This edition includes :
>Re: wish list / drying racks
>Re: wish list / drying racks
>Re: wish list / drying racks
>Re: increased budget wish list
>What is a pug mill?
>Re: increased budget wish list
>Re: What is a pug mill?
>Re: Fwd: Thanks
>Tips: Passes out of class - Long Post
>Tips for starting out the year ...
>Re: VISUAL ARTS IN A NEW KEY!
>passes out of class
>Re: increased budget wish list
>Re: increased budget wish list

>----------------------------------------------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 14:55:22 -0400
>From: Michael Keller <keller>
>Subject: Re: wish list / drying racks

>Screens with fiberglass nets are prefereable, no rusting. You can make your
>own, a roll of that screen is rather cheap.

>Heidi McElroy wrote:

>> Greetings ,
>> For those of you without a drying rack...consider old aluminum
>> window screens or plastic boxes from Coca Cola (the stackable kind). I
>> found both in the trash and use them all year. Great stuff in people's
>> trash. Art teachers make great scavengers. heidi m.

>- --
>Michael Keller
>Old and New Media

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 15:00:50 -0400 (EDT)
>From: Fran Marze <fmaiu+@pitt.edu>
>Subject: Re: wish list / drying racks

>How do you get these free? Are these the ones that hold the 2 liter
>bottles and are different colored plastic or something else? I'm not sure
>what they are? Fran

>On Thu, 30 Jul 1998, Heidi McElroy wrote:

>> Kathy,
>> the kind of coke boxes I am talking about are about 4 to 6 inches
>> high and about 15 x 24 inches rectangles. These measurements are
>> remembered as they are stacked in my storeroom at school. They will hold a
>> number of small prints. They are not as space efficient as window
>> screens...but they are free. Coke boxes also are good for holding ceramic
>> projects in progress, for drying clay projects and for presenting one
>> classes's work to them after firing. Heidi M.
>>
>>

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 16:59:00 -0400
>From: "Litesal" <Litesal>
>Subject: Re: wish list / drying racks

>- -----Original Message-----
>From: Stenger - Judith DiSalvo <jstenger>
>To: Heidi McElroy <hmcelroy>
>Cc: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
>Date: Thursday, July 30, 1998 9:55 AM
>Subject: Re: wish list / drying racks

>Judith wrote:

>>I learned this trick from a silk-screen instructor. Cut the rollers from
>>the wire hangers you get from the cleaners into pieces about 2 or 3 inches
>>long. Alternate these with plastic spring-type clothespins on lengths or
>>wire, and string them across the room. These are great for anything that
>>doesn't have to dry horizontally.
>>Judy

>That's a great idea!! I have a drying line in my room, but all the prints
>would stick together as they slid to the middle. I use paper clips instead
>of clothes pins to hold the paper.

>Thanks, Leah

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 19:10:55 EDT
>From: Bicyclken
>Subject: Re: increased budget wish list

>Dear Kathy,

>I have a Dick Blick etching press and it has been a great piece of machinery.
>I use it for collagraphs, etchings, embossings and monoprints. I would urge
>you to choose the biggest that you can afford because the size will limit
your
>works. Also get all the blankets because you can mix and match them.

>Ken Schwab
>San Jose CA.

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 16:53:10 -0700
>From: Maggie White <mwhite>
>Subject: What is a pug mill?

>Hello, all,

>I inherited from another school a contraption that I think is a pug mill.
>It was manufactured by A.D. Alpine (never heard of them). There is a
>hopper on top with a long handle with which to push material in. There's
>a lot of dried clay and trash inside, but there seems to be an auger- or
>giant screw-like part inside at the bottom, which goes into a sort of
>pipe that runs 10-12" out from the main hopper section; it has an open
>end.

>If this sounds like a pug mill to you, would you please explain exactly
>what it's for? De-airing clay? Can you throw in all your dried scraps
>and some water and turn it on and get nice clay from the other end?
>Although I took a lot of ceramics in college, the precious grad students
>ran all the equipment and kilns.

>Also, while searching for info on the Web about pug mills, I came across
>this interesting site regarding Thai celadon:
> http://www.infothai.com/wtcmcr/thstone.htm
>which is part of a much larger site on Thailand. There was also a really
>interesting thread on recycling clay on a clay group on DejaNews (just
>type in "recycling clay"). Neither had the info I was looking for, but
>the serendipitous info was great.

>One other thing: has anyone tried wedging on Sheetrock or plasterboard?
>My homemade bats are always getting broken.

>Thanks,

>Maggie

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 19:47:14 -0500
>From: gregjuli
>Subject: Re: increased budget wish list

>Mcracker wrote:

>> Kathy-
>> A huge drying rack and a printing press!
>> Marcia

>Ditto the drying rack!!!---amd some good slides.-------MaryB.

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 23:07:33 -0400
>From: Michael Keller <keller>
>Subject: Re: What is a pug mill?

>A pug mill is mostly for de-airing WET clay. It's great for recycling your
>wet scraps and even for mixing small amounts of dry clay (if you buy your
>clay dry, as opposed to wet). Small amounts as compared to a real clay
>mixer.<g>

>Maggie White wrote:

>> Hello, all,
>>
>> I inherited from another school a contraption that I think is a pug mill.
>> It was manufactured by A.D. Alpine (never heard of them). There is a
>> hopper on top with a long handle with which to push material in. There's
>> a lot of dried clay and trash inside, but there seems to be an auger- or
>> giant screw-like part inside at the bottom, which goes into a sort of
>> pipe that runs 10-12" out from the main hopper section; it has an open
>> end.

>- --
>Michael Keller
>Old and New Media

>------------------------------

>Date: Thu, 30 Jul 1998 22:38:03 -0500
>From: Chaney <lchaney>
>Subject: Re: Fwd: Thanks

>- --------------D030FC1928A30F8215881460
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

>> One of my major thoughts has been about organizing lesson plans. Would
>anyone
>> like to comment on how many lesson plans they simultaneously have going and
>> the breakdown of the grades that you work with ? In my mind I was thinking
>> that K would be it's own entity as many of the K children are still 4 1/2
>> years old on entering and much skill building is needed for them. 1st to
>3rd
>> grade was my next breakdown and then 4th to 6th grade.

>For 6 years I taught art to grades K-12. For elementary I had 2 classes of
>each
>grade (K-6) Then a junior high class that I saw daily and 2 high school
>classes.
>It literally wore me out. I had separate lessons for each grade. I found
>that
>the students complained when I repeated a project. "We did this last year."
>They
>didn't realize how difficult it was to keep track of the different lessons.
I
>had
>a great filing system. I got a lot of ideas from Arts and Activities
>magazine,
>and the internet. I hear that quite a few teachers group their grades like
>you
>said you would. I really don't know which way is best.

>> Would anyone like to provide information on how you record each students'
>> work, effort and the format you may use? I am not referring to grades,
just
>> monitoring each class week by week. For instance there are 5 K classes,
>seven
>> 1st grade classes and 3 to 4 of grades 2 to 6.

>For elementary I had a roll-o-dex on my desk. Each teacher had a section in
>it
>for his or her class. The first day of school each student received a card
>from
>it to fill out with name, grade, and class. On the card I would write grades
>for
>projects. + for wonderfully completed, check mark for completed to
>expectations
>and - for unsuccessful. If a minus was written an explanation of why was
also
>noted. Behavior problems were also documented on the card. Each quarter the
>students received new cards after grades went out and they could destroy the
>old
>ones or keep them. I only showed these roll-o-dex cards to parents if they
>requested to see them or if a problem. I helped me keep track of documenting
>things and at grade card time filling out grades. I hope this doesn't sound
>confusing.

>Each class had a designated shelf to place projects in progress which I
>cleaned
>out quarterly. A large folder was used for each class.

>Any questions about this please ask.
>I am proud to say that I will no longer be teaching K-12. I just landed a
new
>job
>teaching 6th grade art only full time. I'm really excited.

>Melissa Chaney

>>
>>
>> My fax # is (602 ) 870 4959 if anyone has a sample of a lesson plan sheet,
>> attendance sheet or other they would like to share.
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Jennifer Henry, Phoenix Advantage Charter School

>- --------------D030FC1928A30F8215881460
>Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

><HTML>
>&nbsp;
><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>One of my major thoughts has been about organizing
>lesson plans.&nbsp; Would anyone
><BR>like to comment on how many lesson plans they simultaneously have going
>and
><BR>the breakdown of the grades that you work with ?&nbsp; In my mind I
>was thinking
><BR>that K would be it's own entity as many of the K children are still
>4 1/2
><BR>years old on entering and much skill building is needed for them.&nbsp;
>1st to 3rd
><BR>grade was my next breakdown and then 4th to 6th grade.</BLOCKQUOTE>
>For 6 years I taught art to grades K-12.&nbsp; For elementary I had 2 classes
>of each grade (K-6)&nbsp; Then a junior high class that I saw daily and
>2 high school classes.&nbsp; It literally wore me out.&nbsp; I had separate
>lessons for each grade.&nbsp; I found that the students complained when
>I repeated a project.&nbsp;<I> "We did this last year."&nbsp;</I> They
>didn't realize how difficult it was to keep track of the different
>lessons.&nbsp;
>I had a great filing system.&nbsp; I got a lot of ideas from <I>Arts and
>Activities </I>magazine, and the internet.&nbsp; I hear that quite a few
>teachers group their grades like you said you would.&nbsp; I really don't
>know which way is best.
><BR>&nbsp;
><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>Would anyone like to provide information on how you
>record each students'
><BR>work, effort and the format you may use?&nbsp; I am not referring to
>grades, just
><BR>monitoring each class week by week.&nbsp; For instance there are 5
>K classes, seven
><BR>1st grade classes and 3 to 4 of grades 2 to 6.</BLOCKQUOTE>
>For elementary I had a roll-o-dex on my desk.&nbsp; Each teacher had a
>section in it for his or her class.&nbsp; The first day of school each
>student received a card from it to fill out with name, grade, and
class.&nbsp;
>On the card I would write grades for projects. + for wonderfully completed,
>check mark for completed to expectations and - for unsuccessful.&nbsp;
>If a minus was written an explanation of why was also noted.&nbsp; Behavior
>problems were also documented on the card.&nbsp; Each quarter the students
>received new cards after grades went out and they could destroy the old
>ones or keep them.&nbsp; I only showed these roll-o-dex cards to parents
>if they requested to see them or if a problem.&nbsp; I helped me keep track
>of documenting things and at grade card time filling out grades.&nbsp;
>I hope this doesn't sound confusing.

><P>Each class had a designated shelf to place projects in progress which
>I cleaned out quarterly.&nbsp; A large folder was used for each class.
><BR>&nbsp;

><P>Any questions about this please ask.
><BR>I am proud to say that I will no longer be teaching K-12.&nbsp; I just
>landed a new job teaching 6th grade art only full time.&nbsp; I'm really
>excited.
><BR>&nbsp;

><P>Melissa Chaney
><BR>&nbsp;
><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>&nbsp;

><P>My fax # is (602 ) 870 4959 if anyone has a sample of a lesson plan
>sheet,
><BR>attendance sheet or other they would like to share.

><P>Thank you,
><BR>Jennifer Henry, Phoenix Advantage Charter School</BLOCKQUOTE>
>&nbsp;</HTML>

>- --------------D030FC1928A30F8215881460--

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 05:47:11 EDT
>From: Toulouse95
>Subject: Tips: Passes out of class - Long Post

>It seems my students used to think you should be able to get out of art
>classes to make up tests, go the bathroom, to the phone to call a poor parent
>to bring things, etc. ("but Mrs. Young, NO one else will let me go ")

>Solved that one. I handout list of class procedures the first day go over
>them like my hero, Harry Wong, says to do. Included:

>"PASSES OUT OF CLASS
>You have a coupon that may be used up to twice a semester as a pass out of
>class for an emergency trip to the bathroom, telephone, library or to another
>classroom at the request of that instructor. Do not ask to leave class
without
>your coupon. When making a request to leave the room, please have your
coupon,
>a pen and the single hole punch with you. These coupon is your
responsibility.
>Loss of the coupon results in loss of privileges."

>Results: I RARELY have students asking to go somewhere. The vast majority of
>them do not use the four chances they have for the year. The first year I
gave
>credit for those not using all of their times, but not last year. I was
>surprised at the kids that never used theirs once.

>Making the coupon: I buy a large sheet of specialty paper something the kids
>cant imitate (well, not to date, anyway. J ). I computer generate a sticker
>with PASS OUT OF CLASS with their name on the second line, and a large I, 2,
3
>and 4 spread across the bottom, all centered. I stick them on the center of
>about a 2x3 piece of the specialty paper, with margin showing all around.
Then
>I laminate them. Next, I put a sticker at the top of the back of the coupon
>with four numbered lines with places for DATE, TIME and DESTINATION on them.
>This isnt laminated so the information can be entered in ink. Then when a
>student asks to be excused, I grill them "You know you only have two passes
>out of class for the whole semester. Sure you really want to use it now?" At
>first, Ill have a lot of requests, but they almost always change their minds
>about going, and I dont have to be the bad guy and say "NO!". They make the
>call (although I do not automatically grant any request. They STILL have to
>have my permission to go).

>If they really need to go, I punch the number out and have them write the
info
>on the back. Works great, Im telling you, if you stick to your guns on it.
>THis idea has saved me MANY a headache and my kids are in class working and
>not floating around. If you try it, make sure to pay attention to the
>positioning of the stickers so you don't punch out pertinent information on
>the back.

>If anyone is interested, I could send you my files with the stickers on them.
>They are in Microsoft Works (much better label capabilities than Word, go
>figure).

>Id also share my list of procedures if anyone thinks theyd like to take a
>gander.

>Mary Jane

>PS - I make a few extras with no name stickers that I use when I get a new
>student. I keep them under wraps, of course.

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 05:46:36 EDT
>From: Toulouse95
>Subject: Tips for starting out the year ...

>How about a new strand? What about tips for starting out the year, since it
is
>fast approaching? The time saving tips were good. I know you folks have good
>ideas to share that will make our lives in the classroom more productive,
>easier and happier all at the same time!

>I am going to post one about handling passes out of class that works well for
>me.

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 07:46:16 EDT
>From: RWilk85411
>Subject: Re: VISUAL ARTS IN A NEW KEY!

>Isn't it a shame that we have to keep bringing this up in our field? It is a
>shame that so many of our fellows seem to think that monkey-see-monkey-do is
>teaching art. Thank you for your comments.
>Reatha

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 08:11:19 -0400
>From: Kurt Hasselman <kprs>
>Subject: passes out of class

>Like everyone else, my students try to use art class to go and do those
>things they can't get out and do in other classes, i.e. make up tests,
>go to the bathroom, make a phone call etc.

>I have taken this approach and it has made them rethink going. I let
>them go. I try to make the class about "the work", and being an
>"artist". The beginning students are so overwhelmed by this approach,
>that they rarely ask for a pass, because of ,I think, the "atmosphere",
>where everyone has "hunkered down" and started the "work", and my
>advance students have permission to write their own passes, so the
>discreetly write a pass, get up and leave, and hustle back to continue
>"the work". My philosophy with them has been "in the real world you get
>so involved with "the work" that you may not even stop to go to the
>bathroom, eat, or use the phone, or G*d forbid, see tv", so that we try
>to maintain that "real world", and to that end we all realize that when
>you have to go to the bathroom in the "real world", you don't ask
>permission, you just go.

>Do I have people who try to misuse the "system"? of course I do, but I
>nip that in the bud, by watching how long it takes them, how many times
>they go, and then speaking to them about it.....I have been heard to say
>"out loud" to certain kids, "well, I guess you had better find another
>teacher's class to get out of, because you won't be leaving this class
>for the next 2 weeks, and then I stick to it...." You only have to do
>that once, (and early on too), and then no one misuses the "system".

>By the end of the school year, my kids are roaming the grounds with
>drawing boards, getting reference materials for their "work", drawing,
>sketching, and coming back showing each other.

>Now, not all of my kids are motivated...but those who aren't feel, left
>out of the "loop", will sit and do their assignments to the best of
>their ability, and then get out other work to work on. (They know the
>drill, though).

>San D

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 08:50:43 EDT
>From: Mcracker
>Subject: Re: increased budget wish list

>In a message dated 98-07-30 20:47:27 EDT, gregjuli writes:

><< Ditto the drying rack!!!---amd some good slides.-------MaryB. >>
>Instead of slides, I've started using transparencies almost exclusively. I
>take the image I want to my local copy place and have a transparency and a
>color copy made .....The color copy gets used for a bulletin board to
>reinforce the concept or to show what the motivation for a project was. Also,
>the transparencies can be easily stored and seen and drawn on when
discussing.
>(or used with an overlaying transparency to discuss the artist's use of line
>or shape ---when the original is removed, the kids can actually see the
>underlying structure.
>.....Have any of you used a machine caled a Direct Plus? It was new to me
last
>year.....projects a book page with slight distortion...or student work...or
>3-D objects. Pretty neat!
>Marcai

>------------------------------

>Date: Fri, 31 Jul 1998 10:41:31 -0400
>From: "Litesal" <Litesal>
>Subject: Re: increased budget wish list

>>Marcia wrote:

>>.....Have any of you used a machine caled a Direct Plus? It was new to me
>last
>>year.....projects a book page with slight distortion...or student work...or
>>3-D objects. Pretty neat!
>>Marcai

>Sounds like the old, opaque projector. Hopefully the new version is
>smaller!

>Leah

>------------------------------

>End of artsednet-digest V2 #863
>*******************************

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-- 
 
When I taught art (HS/JrHi) and a teacher sent a request for a student to miss
my class to do makeup, test etc, I sent back a reply to the effect yhat the
student would need to miss that class one day to make up for the lost time in
art.  Seemed to work as not many asked again.