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Lesson Plans


Re: Fwd: Thanks

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Chaney (lchaney)
Thu, 30 Jul 1998 22:38:03 -0500


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> One of my major thoughts has been about organizing lesson plans. Would anyone
> like to comment on how many lesson plans they simultaneously have going and
> the breakdown of the grades that you work with ? In my mind I was thinking
> that K would be it's own entity as many of the K children are still 4 1/2
> years old on entering and much skill building is needed for them. 1st to 3rd
> grade was my next breakdown and then 4th to 6th grade.

For 6 years I taught art to grades K-12. For elementary I had 2 classes of each
grade (K-6) Then a junior high class that I saw daily and 2 high school classes.
It literally wore me out. I had separate lessons for each grade. I found that
the students complained when I repeated a project. "We did this last year." They
didn't realize how difficult it was to keep track of the different lessons. I had
a great filing system. I got a lot of ideas from Arts and Activities magazine,
and the internet. I hear that quite a few teachers group their grades like you
said you would. I really don't know which way is best.

> Would anyone like to provide information on how you record each students'
> work, effort and the format you may use? I am not referring to grades, just
> monitoring each class week by week. For instance there are 5 K classes, seven
> 1st grade classes and 3 to 4 of grades 2 to 6.

For elementary I had a roll-o-dex on my desk. Each teacher had a section in it
for his or her class. The first day of school each student received a card from
it to fill out with name, grade, and class. On the card I would write grades for
projects. + for wonderfully completed, check mark for completed to expectations
and - for unsuccessful. If a minus was written an explanation of why was also
noted. Behavior problems were also documented on the card. Each quarter the
students received new cards after grades went out and they could destroy the old
ones or keep them. I only showed these roll-o-dex cards to parents if they
requested to see them or if a problem. I helped me keep track of documenting
things and at grade card time filling out grades. I hope this doesn't sound
confusing.

Each class had a designated shelf to place projects in progress which I cleaned
out quarterly. A large folder was used for each class.

Any questions about this please ask.
I am proud to say that I will no longer be teaching K-12. I just landed a new job
teaching 6th grade art only full time. I'm really excited.

Melissa Chaney

>
>
> My fax # is (602 ) 870 4959 if anyone has a sample of a lesson plan sheet,
> attendance sheet or other they would like to share.
>
> Thank you,
> Jennifer Henry, Phoenix Advantage Charter School

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One of my major thoughts has been about organizing lesson plans.  Would anyone
like to comment on how many lesson plans they simultaneously have going and
the breakdown of the grades that you work with ?  In my mind I was thinking
that K would be it's own entity as many of the K children are still 4 1/2
years old on entering and much skill building is needed for them.  1st to 3rd
grade was my next breakdown and then 4th to 6th grade.
For 6 years I taught art to grades K-12.  For elementary I had 2 classes of each grade (K-6)  Then a junior high class that I saw daily and 2 high school classes.  It literally wore me out.  I had separate lessons for each grade.  I found that the students complained when I repeated a project.  "We did this last year."  They didn't realize how difficult it was to keep track of the different lessons.  I had a great filing system.  I got a lot of ideas from Arts and Activities magazine, and the internet.  I hear that quite a few teachers group their grades like you said you would.  I really don't know which way is best.
 
Would anyone like to provide information on how you record each students'
work, effort and the format you may use?  I am not referring to grades, just
monitoring each class week by week.  For instance there are 5 K classes, seven
1st grade classes and 3 to 4 of grades 2 to 6.
For elementary I had a roll-o-dex on my desk.  Each teacher had a section in it for his or her class.  The first day of school each student received a card from it to fill out with name, grade, and class.  On the card I would write grades for projects. + for wonderfully completed, check mark for completed to expectations and - for unsuccessful.  If a minus was written an explanation of why was also noted.  Behavior problems were also documented on the card.  Each quarter the students received new cards after grades went out and they could destroy the old ones or keep them.  I only showed these roll-o-dex cards to parents if they requested to see them or if a problem.  I helped me keep track of documenting things and at grade card time filling out grades.  I hope this doesn't sound confusing.

Each class had a designated shelf to place projects in progress which I cleaned out quarterly.  A large folder was used for each class.
 

Any questions about this please ask.
I am proud to say that I will no longer be teaching K-12.  I just landed a new job teaching 6th grade art only full time.  I'm really excited.
 

Melissa Chaney
 

 

My fax # is (602 ) 870 4959 if anyone has a sample of a lesson plan sheet,
attendance sheet or other they would like to share.

Thank you,
Jennifer Henry, Phoenix Advantage Charter School

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