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Lesson Plans


Re: suggestions for elementary teacher training

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Louise Lutton (lutton.us)
Thu, 23 Jul 1998 04:49:11 +0000


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From: Barbara Hall <bahall>
To: <artsednet.edu>
Subject: suggestions for elementary teacher training
Date: Tue, Jul 21, 1998, 4:57 AM

hello all, I have been asked to do a teacher training for elementary
classroom teachers in my district ( I am
the Junior high and HS art teacher ) The elementary principal sees it as a "
wonderful opportunity " for me to
have better trained little artists in the 7th grade, I am glad to do this
training, but am thinking that for
some of these classroom teachers, teaching art might be as uncomfortable for
them as, god forbid, if I had to
teach math. So I am thinking SPEND THE MONEY AND HIRE AN ELEMENTARY ART
SPECIALIST but this of course is getting
into a whole other issue SO I am curious.....

What would you all try to give these people in 3 hours ( including bathroom
break of course ) that might assist
them in providing some sort of visual literacy. I really want to discourage
classroom art experiences as being
just a series of projects.

I would especially like to hear from the elementary art teachers...what do
you all think is vital ? I nave been
out of the elementary art loop for a while.
thanks in advance

Amanda, It really amazes me when an administrator asks someone to "train"
teachers how to teach el. art....in 3 hours (with bathroom break) no
less.!!!!!!!!!!!!!
It's taken me well over 4 years of undergrad, masters and years in the
classroom............
Anyway, I guess my approach would be to try to get them to make as many
hands on connections with their current curriculum. Emphasize concepts
of art.......COLOR, SHAPE, LINE, DETAIL, etc.
In science, make collages of growing plants. Observe pussy willows in
spring, talk about change, and the elements of art observed in the still
life. Draw

In reading, show illustrations and study how authors/artists go about
creating the visual images for their written words. Make books.

In music connect the rhythms of the sound with visual movements in paint.
Paint

And so forth. Mostly I'd emphasize different modes of learning and making
connections from one area of study with visual imagery.

Following is a quote from Rosa from a few days ago.

Louise in Mich.

Another vital thing is to teach them how
to "see", not just to look but to "see" and perceive. To "see" and
perceive the world around them and then "translate it into the shape
pattern available on the pictorial surface or in a sculpture
medium"(Rudolph Arnheim). Then we come to techniques and factual knowledge.
It is important in my estimation to teach technique and facts in the arts
as in other fields of study, but it has to be taught with great sensitivity
and at the right time(something the art teacher must sense).
I also believe you cannot teach art without braiding together the four
threads of DBAE, art history, aestethics, criticism and art production. As
someone on this list said that "he wanted his students to have respect for
art history as a record of creativity and the human spirit"

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Re: suggestions for elementary teacher training
----------
From: Barbara Hall <bahall>
To: <artsednet.edu>
Subject: suggestions for elementary teacher training
Date: Tue, Jul 21, 1998, 4:57 AM


hello all, I have been asked to do a teacher training for elementary
classroom teachers in my district ( I am
the Junior high and HS art teacher ) The elementary principal sees it as a = "
wonderful opportunity " for me to
have better trained little artists in the 7th grade, I am glad to do this training, but am thinking that for
some of these classroom teachers, teaching art might be as uncomfortable fo= r
them as, god forbid, if I had to
teach math. So I am thinking SPEND THE MONEY AND HIRE AN ELEMENTARY ART
SPECIALIST but this of course is getting
into a whole other issue SO I am curious.....

What would you all try to give these people in 3 hours ( including bathroom=
break of course ) that might assist
them in providing some sort of visual literacy. I really want to discourag= e
classroom art experiences as being
just a series of projects.

I would especially like to hear from the elementary art teachers...what do<= BR> you all think is vital ? I nave been
out of the elementary art loop for a while.
thanks in advance

Amanda, It really amazes me when an administrator asks someone to "tra= in"
teachers how to teach el. art....in 3 hours (with bathroom break) no less.!= !!!!!!!!!!!!
It's taken me well over 4 years of undergrad, masters and years in the
classroom............
Anyway, I guess my approach would be to try to get them to make as many
hands on connections with their current curriculum. Emphasize concepts
of art.......COLOR, SHAPE, LINE, DETAIL, etc.
In science, make collages of growing plants. Observe pussy willows in
spring, talk about change, and the elements of art observed in the still life. Draw

In reading, show illustrations and study how authors/artists go about
creating the visual images for their written words. Make books.

In music connect the rhythms of the sound with visual movements in paint. Paint

And so forth. Mostly I'd emphasize different modes of learning and making = connections from one area of study with visual imagery.

Following is a quote from Rosa from a few days ago.

Louise in Mich.

Another vital thing is to teach them how
to "see", not just to look but to "see" and perceive. T= o "see" and
perceive the world around them and then "translate it into the shape pattern available on the pictorial surface or in a sculpture
medium"(Rudolph Arnheim). Then we come to techniques and factual knowl= edge.
It is important in my estimation to teach technique and facts in the arts<= BR> as in other fields of study, but it has to be taught with great sensitivity=
and at the right time(something the art teacher must sense).
I also believe you cannot teach art without braiding together the four
threads of DBAE, art history, aestethics, criticism and art production. As<= BR> someone on this list said that "he wanted his students to have respect= for
art history as a record of creativity and the human spirit"


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