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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 02, 2011

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From: Daniel Murren (djmurren_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Jul 03 2011 - 12:38:22 PDT


I have been always reading this digest and find it very helpful. I just have never figured out whether to reply or how to start a new discussion. So I am replying now to this and will see if it works. I am an art teacher for grades 1-8.
Sue

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Sunday, July 03, 2011 3:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 02, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, July 02, 2011.

1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 01, 2011
2. Arts and Advocacy: Let's Stick Together
3. RE: Arts and Advocacy: Let's Stick Together

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Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 01, 2011
From: "L. Green" <letiime@earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 08:15:14 -0700 (GMT-07:00)
X-Message-Number: 1

I am retired, but I find this exchange of ideas, thoughts and information are extremely important for the defense and continuity of Art Education. Cordiales saludos. Leticia

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Subject: Arts and Advocacy: Let's Stick Together
From: Linda Travers <ltravers@abrakadoodle.com>
Date: Sat, 02 Jul 2011 13:34:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello All:
I have gotten so much out of the discussions on this exchange but alas,
have never posted before. I have a small art education business
teaching to young children (ages 20-36 months and their caregivers) and
to kids 3-10 yrs (not all at the same time though!). I am passionate
about advocating for the arts as a teacher, parent, and professional.
It is most important that we start locally (our school systems, city,
county, and state levels. Find out what's available in your community.
Americans for the Arts is a good place to start, and your local arts
organizations, which are also hurting (especially here in GA). It
should be STEAM not STEM-- Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and
Mathematics. Nothing like a good email or letter writing campaign to
your elected officials. We must all be the Squeaky Wheels For Arts Team
(SWAT!).
By the way, in May the Atlantic Monthly published a series of articles
on creativity. All were artists of one form or another (visual arts,
music, architecture) A letter writer asked why no technology people were
profiled. Hummmm,

On 7/2/2011 3:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, July 01, 2011.
>
> 1. Re: Let's stick together
> 2. Re: Let's stick together
> 3. Re: Let's stick together
> 4. Re: Let's stick together
> 5. Great Stuff - Art from ANYTHING - a real artist who recycles to share (NY Times)
> 6. An artist who makes art from ANYTHING - New York Times article - good stuff
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Let's stick together
> From: Jerry Vilenski<jvilenski@yahoo.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 04:43:06 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Judy and All,
>
> I have been following the thread about the diminished use of this list serve, and I thought I would throw in my two cents worth. I have been a long time member of this group, and have contributed several ideas, opinions and advice over the years. I am retired now, but still maintain an interest in the issues facing teachers in the arts. While many consider political comments taboo on this list, I am of the opinion that perhaps, in addition to offering each other advice and support, that this is the exact forum to discuss the real life challenges facing our profession. I don't think we can afford to ignore the crushing blows to art education and education in general that are occurring on almost a daily basis in our country. Teacher's rights to bargain contracts, tenure, budgets, and financing are all under attack, and effect each and every art teacher on this list in some way. How can you as a teacher of art be fairly evaluated by an
> administrator who has little or no knowledge of what you actually do for a living? Legislatures want your salary tied to classroom test scores--really? How does anyone in the arts survive when many don't test at all or there is no adequate standardized testing in your field? Is that what you want your studio art classes to become, a place where you spend the majority of your time teaching to a test? The answer should be obvious--you probably won't survive for long without some kind of political action. When the arts are at the whim of increasingly hostile state legislatures, governors, school boards and desperate administrations, it is amazing there are any art teachers out there left to participate in an art teachers forum at all!
>
> I learned a lot of things in my many years as an art teacher, and among them was to become a leader in every sense of the word. All of us need to become advocates of our profession and our students, and if that means becoming political, then you may have to leave your comfort level and do just that. No one, and I mean no one, will advocate on your behalf if you don't start with yourself. If you can't show passion and dedication to what you do for kids every day, don't expect others to step up to the plate for you-- it simply won't happen. Perhaps it's time to turn a new page with this forum, and teach our colleagues the fine art of advocacy.
>
> Jerry
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Let's stick together
> From: "Rie.Create"<rie.create@gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 08:10:19 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Great post (and idea) Jerry. For those who are looking for powerful words to echo... I've found great advocacy material in Charles Fowler's book Strong Arts Strong Schools: the promising potential and shortsighted disregard of the arts in American schooling.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 1, 2011, at 7:43 AM, Jerry Vilenski<jvilenski@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Judy and All,
>>
>> I have been following the thread about the diminished use of this list serve, and I thought I would throw in my two cents worth. I have been a long time member of this group, and have contributed several ideas, opinions and advice over the years. I am retired now, but still maintain an interest in the issues facing teachers in the arts. While many consider political comments taboo on this list, I am of the opinion that perhaps, in addition to offering each other advice and support, that this is the exact forum to discuss the real life challenges facing our profession. I don't think we can afford to ignore the crushing blows to art education and education in general that are occurring on almost a daily basis in our country. Teacher's rights to bargain contracts, tenure, budgets, and financing are all under attack, and effect each and every art teacher on this list in some way. How can you as a teacher of art be fairly evaluated by an
>> administrator who has little or no knowledge of what you actually do for a living? Legislatures want your salary tied to classroom test scores--really? How does anyone in the arts survive when many don't test at all or there is no adequate standardized testing in your field? Is that what you want your studio art classes to become, a place where you spend the majority of your time teaching to a test? The answer should be obvious--you probably won't survive for long without some kind of political action. When the arts are at the whim of increasingly hostile state legislatures, governors, school boards and desperate administrations, it is amazing there are any art teachers out there left to participate in an art teachers forum at all!
>>
>> I learned a lot of things in my many years as an art teacher, and among them was to become a leader in every sense of the word. All of us need to become advocates of our profession and our students, and if that means becoming political, then you may have to leave your comfort level and do just that. No one, and I mean no one, will advocate on your behalf if you don't start with yourself. If you can't show passion and dedication to what you do for kids every day, don't expect others to step up to the plate for you-- it simply won't happen. Perhaps it's time to turn a new page with this forum, and teach our colleagues the fine art of advocacy.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Let's stick together
> From: "Rie.Create"<rie.create@gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 08:15:27 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> ...and Jessica Hoffman Davis' book Why Our Schools Need The Arts. On page 99 she even lists 'Advocacy Dont's and Do's
>
> Happy advocating!! And thanks to everyone past and present who have been fighting the good fight :)
>
>
>
> On Jul 1, 2011, at 7:43 AM, Jerry Vilenski<jvilenski@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Judy and All,
>>
>> I have been following the thread about the diminished use of this list serve, and I thought I would throw in my two cents worth. I have been a long time member of this group, and have contributed several ideas, opinions and advice over the years. I am retired now, but still maintain an interest in the issues facing teachers in the arts. While many consider political comments taboo on this list, I am of the opinion that perhaps, in addition to offering each other advice and support, that this is the exact forum to discuss the real life challenges facing our profession. I don't think we can afford to ignore the crushing blows to art education and education in general that are occurring on almost a daily basis in our country. Teacher's rights to bargain contracts, tenure, budgets, and financing are all under attack, and effect each and every art teacher on this list in some way. How can you as a teacher of art be fairly evaluated by an
>> administrator who has little or no knowledge of what you actually do for a living? Legislatures want your salary tied to classroom test scores--really? How does anyone in the arts survive when many don't test at all or there is no adequate standardized testing in your field? Is that what you want your studio art classes to become, a place where you spend the majority of your time teaching to a test? The answer should be obvious--you probably won't survive for long without some kind of political action. When the arts are at the whim of increasingly hostile state legislatures, governors, school boards and desperate administrations, it is amazing there are any art teachers out there left to participate in an art teachers forum at all!
>>
>> I learned a lot of things in my many years as an art teacher, and among them was to become a leader in every sense of the word. All of us need to become advocates of our profession and our students, and if that means becoming political, then you may have to leave your comfort level and do just that. No one, and I mean no one, will advocate on your behalf if you don't start with yourself. If you can't show passion and dedication to what you do for kids every day, don't expect others to step up to the plate for you-- it simply won't happen. Perhaps it's time to turn a new page with this forum, and teach our colleagues the fine art of advocacy.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Let's stick together
> From: Jeff Pridie<jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 06:14:24 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Jerry well said. I to have been on this listserv and other eduction websites for years. As an art teacher that works in a very small district without many fellow art teachers to bounce ideas off of the art education listservs have been a staff development life line. It was through these listservs, my masters degree that I connected to my path of art advocacy. It first started by "getting out" of my classroom, being actively involved in museum education programing, then working with in a quality "arts" education group, helping develop state art standards, then serving on my local art education association as YAM chair, that lead to the art education association president-elect/president position, that position lead to representing my state a the national level of NAEA in delegate assembly helping shape position statements that are "voiced" to federal and state educational agencies. Being in a position to bend the ears of those that can influence
> the direction of Art Education of the 21st Century is all our responsibilities either at the grassroot level or on a National level. As Jerry said we need to move our of our comfort zone, if we truly value what we do, the importance of it to the nations children we need to be active participants. One thing I know, one thing that was even mentioned at our Western Region NAEA Conference recently, is that we need to tell our stories. The stories of arts impact on your students, the life changing impacts, mixing in the research backed studies....the stories are the portraits the we need to present......the art work is pretty but the stories are eternal and touch the heart and can change policy.
>>
>> jeff
>>
>>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Great Stuff - Art from ANYTHING - a real artist who recycles to share (NY Times)
> From: Judy Decker<jdecker4art@yahoo.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 09:46:04 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> You are going to LOVE this (well, we did anyways - hubby and I).
> New York Times:
>
> An Artist Who Makes Much Out of Very Littlehttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/01/arts/design/b-wurtz-works-1970-2011-at-metro-pictures-gallery-review.html
>
> If link doesn't work, you can get there from here:
> http://www.nytimes.com/pages/arts/design/index.html
>
> > From the article:
>>> The less-is-more tradition in American art is rich and varied. It stretches from the glorious frugalities of Shaker furniture and Amish quilts to the sleek orthodox Minimalism of Donald Judd’s box
> sculptures and Agnes Martin’s horizontal-stripe paintings. And it also
> accommodates the modest, plain-spoken sculptures and wall pieces of the
> artist B. Wurtz.
>
> At least check out the slide show....You might find your old LPs or your tossed hula-hoop (chuckles).
>
> “B. Wurtz: Works, 1970-2011” is on view through Aug. 5 at Metro
> Pictures, 519 West 24th Street, Chelsea; http://www.metropicturesgallery.com/
> There is even more shown on the web site (see current exhibitions)
>
> Plug for MaryAnn Kohl - Elementary teachers will want to check out her new book "Art with Anything". As you will see, art can be made with anything! and "real artists" do it, too.
>
> Regards,
>
> Â
>
> Judy Decker
>
> P.S. My apologies to anyone who is bored by these New York Times posts (grin).I only post the "good stuff" -- well what I think is good.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: An artist who makes art from ANYTHING - New York Times article - good stuff
> From: Judy Decker<jdecker4art@gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2011 12:51:39 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> My apologies if you eventually get this twice. Getty list rejected my
> post from Yahoo account - and it was in Plain Text....
>
> You are going to LOVE this (well, we did anyways - hubby and I).
> New York Times:
>
> An Artist Who Makes Much Out of Very
> Littlehttp://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/01/arts/design/b-wurtz-works-1970-2011-at-metro-pictures-gallery-review.html
>
> If link doesn't work, you can get there from here:
> http://www.nytimes.com/pages/arts/design/index.html
>
> > From the article:
>>> The less-is-more tradition in American art is rich and varied. It stretches from the glorious frugalities of Shaker furniture and Amish quilts to the sleek orthodox Minimalism of Donald Judd’s box
> sculptures and Agnes Martin’s horizontal-stripe paintings. And it also
> accommodates the modest, plain-spoken sculptures and wall pieces of the
> artist B. Wurtz.
>
> At least check out the slide show....You might find your old LPs or
> your tossed hula-hoop (chuckles).
>
> “B. Wurtz: Works, 1970-2011” is on view through Aug. 5 at Metro
> Pictures, 519 West 24th Street, Chelsea; http://www.metropicturesgallery.com/
> There is even more shown on the web site (see current exhibitions)
>
> Plug for MaryAnn Kohl - Elementary teachers will want to check out her
> new book "Art with Anything". As you will see, art can be made with
> anything! and "real artists" do it, too.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
dle.com
24569db9067684ab@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

-- 
Linda A.Travers, Ph.D
Owner and Educational Director
Abrakadoodle Atlanta
770-579-9800  (office)
404-784-5085 (mobile)
www.abrakadoodle.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Arts and Advocacy: Let's Stick Together
From: Cheryl Lloyd <clloyd@ceres.k12.ca.us>
Date: Sat, 2 Jul 2011 18:31:12 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3
Judy, I completely agree with being an advocate.  I feel like part of my responsibilities as a teacher of the arts is to become an advocate!
For new teachers here are some ways to become more involved:
-Like Judy said...VOTE!  Your voice counts.
-Join your local Art Education Association and NAEA
-Join any local groups.  I have been working with the California Alliance for Arts Education in my county for the past two years.  We have drafted a Master Plan for revitalizing the arts in our community.  We are in the first years.  If you are interested in our plan:  www.stancoe.org/scoe/iss/arts/master_plan.pdf<http://www.stancoe.org/scoe/iss/arts/master_plan.pdf>
If any of you are in CA and want to join your local group:  http://www.artsed411.org/index.aspx
-Support your local art education groups like local performing groups and education classes at local galleries and junior colleges.
- AND the most important is advocating for your own program.  Your kids of today will be the parents of tomorrow and will be the biggest voices for the programs that stay or go in schools.
Happy Advocating,
Cheri Lloyd
Ceres, CA
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