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Re: [teacherartexchange] WSJ Article

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From: Barbara Marder (marder621_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jul 02 2010 - 04:05:01 PDT


I just read a great article and am quoting the following passage from it
as well as the link to the article that is a review of current exhibits.

Is making art objects regressive? Does making work that sells amount to selling out? How valid is self-expression in art? Is there nothing left to do but appropriate, restage and rearrange? Has art become primarily a mirror of larger contexts, whether social, historical or architectural?

Luckily art is more about questions than answers, and in any case cultural clash is always invigorating especially if it reduces the penchant for simple dualities and oppositions. What at first appears to be an either-or choice in these two shows starts to blur once you spend time with them, as the underlying messiness of both art and life seeps through

from todays NY Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/02/arts/design/02parreno.html?_r=1&th=&adxnnl=1&emc=th&adxnnlx=1278068560-gYIPuXlcdgpY+1hcNAWt0A

Barbara

On Jul 2, 2010, at 12:11 AM, Leslie O'Shaughnessy wrote:

> Frankly, this is exactly the kind of thing that drew me into teaching art: current issues and politics.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jun 30, 2010, at 9:39 PM, Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> There is a great discussion going on here. Hopefully others will join in on this topic
>> so we can get a variety of perspectives on the inclusion of social and political content
>> in some art lessons.
>> Woody
>>
>> On Jun 30, 2010, at 7:21 PM, Barbara Marder wrote:
>>
>>> Hi Woody,
>>>
>>> What seems to be the crux of the argument is expressing a vision without an artwork.
>>>
>>> The problem with the "new" social justice art is that somehow we are skipping the art making.
>>>
>>> So why are we calling it "art"?
>>>
>>>
>>>> Barbara - "divisiveness of art educators" - that's a strange way to put it. Artists have opinions and they
>>>> do voice them - that's what democracy is all about. If teachers ask students to voice social content in
>>>> their art, the teacher should not direct the content - that is the students choice. The teacher should
>>>> prepare the students to be accepting of others who have diverse and different views. Art is powerful
>>>> and students should be made aware that one choice is to use their art for social change or to maintain
>>>> the status quo. I do not do political or social art but I respect and applaud those who do.
>>>> Woody
>>>>
>>
>> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
>> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>> Join me as a friend on facebook:
>> http://www.facebook.com/woody.duncan1?ref=name
>>
>> Read My 2010 May Blog:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/May.html
>>
>> Read My 2010 June Blog:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/June.html
>>
>> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>>
>>
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