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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 27, 2006

---------

From: carl toonz (carltoonz_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jul 28 2006 - 04:45:09 PDT


TOUGH SCHEDULES: one year in North Carolina, I had ten 30 minute art classes
with three minutes between each one. I had to raise hell with the
administration about how impossible this was. The following year it was
reduced to 7 classes a day, still a boat load! Thank God I no longer work in
that district or state!
ARTISTIC HEROES: I think there are many for a variety of reasons, Van Gogh
for fighting mental illness and still able to paint, for Courbet and Manet
fighting against the art establishment, for Forrest Bess choosing to live in
obscurity and produce his art the way he wanted to, for Kandinsky and
Mondrian sticking out their necks to create abstract art, the list goes on
and on.

PS: By the way for those that don't know the great Texas artist, Forrest
Bess. Go look at his art on his website. www.forrestbess.org He passed
away in 1988. What dynamic work!
carltoonz@hotmail.com

>From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 27, 2006
>Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 00:00:03 -0700
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, July 27, 2006.
>
>1. tough schedule
>2. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>3. Re:table coverings for clay
>4. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>5. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>6. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>7. Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy Skills (New
>York Times)
>8. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>9. Re:table coverings for clay
>10. Re: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>11. Re: Artists who inspired
>12. Anyone from Kentucky?
>13. Re: Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy Skills
>(New York Times)
>14. Re: Flooring issues
>15. Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>16. Using Technology in Art
>17. Re: Using Technology in Art
>18. Re: Using Technology in Art
>19. Re: Using Technology in Art
>20. Re: Using Technology in Art
>21. Re: table coverings for clay
>22. Re: table coverings for clay
>23. Using Technology in Art
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: tough schedule
>From: <jean1@dejazzd.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 7:48:15 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>My schedule for this upcoming year has a tough afternoon schedule. Thirty
>minute classes, back to back, 6 or 7 in one afternoon, grades K through 3.
>Any suggestions would be welcome. Jeannie in PA
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 04:52:14 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>I would recommend Philip Guston, who lost all his
>friends when he switched from making impressionistic
>'pretty paintings' in the 60s to images seeking social
>justice. He had a lot of courage.
>Beth
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re:table coverings for clay
>From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 05:21:41 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>I have tried a variety of methods for covering tables
>over the years, but I have settled for no coverings at
>all. Instead, I use 6x6 plywood or masonite boards
>for individual projects, the type of boards sold for
>craft projects. I can purchase these in bulk at a
>decent price, and usually have enough for several
>classrooms at a time. Among the many qualities of the
>wood boards is the fact that clay, once leathery, will
>remove easily from the boards for further drying. In
>addition, the board provides a stable surface for
>flattening the bottoms of pottery, cutting slabs and
>an easy method of transporting the clay from tables to
>storage. Once clean-up begins, the boards can be used
>to scrape tables of dried clay and keeps those done
>early busy.
>
>As far as clay tool storage is concerned, I simply use
>a large storage tub filled with clay tools, which
>include traditional clay tools in addition to plastic
>forks, knives, combs, popsicle sticks and anything
>else that will cut or make textures. The kids think
>it is a treasure box and get a good laugh at the goofy
>stuff I put in there to make designs and marks!
>
>Hope this helps,
>
>Jerry
>
>www.artguyvilenski.com
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: "Eileen Eileen" <iforget000@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 09:13:51 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Keith Haring?
>
>From Eileen in Ohio
>
>On 7/26/06, Hillmer, Jan <HillmJan@berkeleyprep.org> wrote:
> > Hi Everyone,
> >
> > To fold a character ed component into art this year, I'd like to compile
> > a list of artists who were "Heroes." Do you have suggestions of artists
> > and their humanitarian contribution to others (beyond their art)?
> >
> > Thanks -
> >
> > Jan
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 09:51:25 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>Dear Jan and all,
>
>I would like to see this list grow....
>
>I posted Jan's request to Art Education and ArtsEducators list and
>here is a reply from Patty Knott.
>
>Names that come to mind of artists that make contributions in other
>ways include:
>
>Dale Chilhuly -- for his work with "at risk " kids
>Rauschenberg-- for bringing awareness to students with learning
>disabilities ( The power of Art: Teaching Students with Learning
>Disabilities)
>Chuck Close--- simply for his courage and incredibly positive
>attitude in spite of all his physical problems
>George Lucas -- The George Lucas Education Foundation is a wonderful
>resource of great ideas for using new and emerging technologies in
>education
>Margaret Bourke-White -- not only was she one of the greatest
>photographers of the 20th century, but one of the greatest women.
>She truly went places no man had gone before.
>Dorethea Lange -- she gave us perhaps THE photo icon of the 20th
>century. And she 'talked back" to the federal govt.
>------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Here are some artists that are on my heroes list:
>
>Jacob Lawrence
>Romare Bearden
>Faith Ringgold
>Kathe Kollwitz
>Keith Haring
>
>Many of my students chose Leonardo da Vinci for their hero when I did
>my Heroes units. Some chose Michelangelo. They were not required to
>select an artist. This was interdisciplinary with social studies.
>
>What artists are your "heroes"?
>
>Judy Decker
>
>On 7/27/06, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
> > I would recommend Philip Guston, who lost all his
> > friends when he switched from making impressionistic
> > 'pretty paintings' in the 60s to images seeking social
> > justice. He had a lot of courage.
> > Beth
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: Jayna Huffines <jayna_99@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 07:33:07 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>I LOVE THIS THREAD!!! This is awesome. I am Character
>Ed committee chair at my school, and I am kicking
>myself for not thinking of this first!
>
>--- Judy Decker <judy.decker@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Dear Jan and all,
> >
> > I would like to see this list grow....
> >
> > I posted Jan's request to Art Education and
> > ArtsEducators list and
> > here is a reply from Patty Knott.
> >
>
>
>Jayna
>
><a href="http://www.myspace.com/netinemmy" target="_blank"><img
>src="http://x.myspace.com/images/Promo/myspace_4.jpg" border="0"><br><img
>src="http://www.myspace.com/images/no_pic.gif" border="0"><br><font
>size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Check me
>out!</font></a>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy Skills
>(New York Times)
>From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 10:36:22 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>Dear Art Educators,
>
>This article appeared in New York Times. You will need to subscribe to
>access the article on line. Subscription is FREE (online).
>
>Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy Skills
>By RANDY KENNEDY
>
>Quoted from the article:
>"The study found that students in the program performed better in six
>categories of literacy and critical thinking skills =97 including
>thorough description, hypothesizing and reasoning =97 than did students
>who were not in the program."
>
>"Yet the study also found that the program did not help improve
>students' scores on the city's standardized English language arts
>test, a result that the study's creators said they could not fully
>explain."
>
>Perhaps if they include WRITING about art (rather than all oral
>questioning) scores might also improve on standardized tests.
>
>This study is listed under BOOKS rather than Art & Design:
>http://www.nytimes.com/pages/books/index.html
>
>Regards,
>
>Judy Decker
>Incredible Art Department
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
>Incredible Art Resources
>http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: Jayna Huffines <jayna_99@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 07:44:13 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>
>
>I can honestly say that Marc Chagall is one of my
>"artist heroes". I'll never forget staring at "the
>Birthday" in my 6th grade literature book and
>absolutely falling in love with his work, and knowing
>right then and there that I would spend my life
>learning about art. One of the highlights of my
>life-long learning experience was getting to see
>Chagall's stained glass windows in Israel. Although I
>do not intend to take you all off topic, can you
>remember an artist who inspired you at a young age?
>
>Jayna
>
><a href="http://www.myspace.com/netinemmy" target="_blank"><img
>src="http://x.myspace.com/images/Promo/myspace_4.jpg" border="0"><br><img
>src="http://www.myspace.com/images/no_pic.gif" border="0"><br><font
>size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Check me
>out!</font></a>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re:table coverings for clay
>From: Jayna Huffines <jayna_99@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 07:52:38 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>I cover mine with canvas "tablecloths". When they get
>really funky I can hose them off and let them dry
>outside. My kids store their work in plastic grocery
>bags (I always have thousands of those).
>
>
>
>
>
>Jayna
>
><a href="http://www.myspace.com/netinemmy" target="_blank"><img
>src="http://x.myspace.com/images/Promo/myspace_4.jpg" border="0"><br><img
>src="http://www.myspace.com/images/no_pic.gif" border="0"><br><font
>size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Check me
>out!</font></a>
>
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 11:05:16 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
>Hi,
>
>Add photographer Lewis Hine to the list. See the web page listed
>below. Also, Ansel Adams for his work with on the environment.
>
>http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRhine.htm
>Lewis Wickes Hine was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin on 26th September,
>1874. He studied sociology in Chicago and New York (1900-07) before
>finding work at the Ethical Culture School. Hine, who had purchased
>his first camera in 1903, employed his photographs in his teaching and
>established what became known as documentary photography.
>
>Hine also used his camera to capture the poverty he witnessed in New
>York. This included a photographic study of Ellis Island immigrants.
>In 1908 Hine published Charities and the Commons, a collection of
>photographs of tenements and sweatshops. Hine hoped he could use these
>photographs to help bring about social reform. He told one meeting
>that he believed his photographs would encourage people to "exert the
>force to right wrongs".
>
>As a school teacher, Hine was especially critical of the country's
>child labour laws. Although some states had enacted legislation
>designed to protect young workers, there were no national laws dealing
>with this problem. In 1908 the National Child Labour Committee
>employed Hine as their staff investigator and photographer. This
>resulted in two books on the subject, Child Labour in the Carolinas
>(1909) and Day Laborers Before Their Time (1909).
>
>Hine travelled the country taking pictures of children working in
>factories. In one 12 month period he covered over 12,000 miles. Unlike
>the photographers who worked for Thomas Barnardo, Hine made no attempt
>to exaggerate the poverty of these young people. Hine's critics
>claimed that his pictures were not "shocking enough". However, Hine
>argued that people were more likely to join the campaign against child
>labour if they felt the photographs accurately captured the reality of
>the situation.
>
>Factory owners often refused Hine permission to take photographs and
>accused him of muckraking. To gain access Hine sometimes hid his
>camera and posed as a fire inspector. Hine worked for the National
>Child Labour Committee for eight years. Hine told one audience:
>"Perhaps you are weary of child labour pictures. Well, so are the rest
>of us, but we propose to make you and the whole country so sick and
>tired of the whole business that when the time for action comes, child
>labour pictures will be records of the past."
>
>In 1916 Congress eventually agreed to pass legislation to protect
>children. As a result of the Keating-Owen Act, restrictions were
>placed on the employment of children aged under 14 in factories and
>shops. Owen Lovejoy, Chairman of the National Child Labour Committee,
>wrote that: "the work Hine did for this reform was more responsible
>than all other efforts in bringing the need to public attention."--
>Harold
>
>Harold Olejarz
>Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
>Website - www.digitalharold.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who inspired
>From: Diane Davis <dianemdavis@mac.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 11:25:26 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>
> > , can you
> > remember an artist who inspired you at a young age?
> >
> > Although many don't consider illustrators "true" artists, I was
> > inspired by Maurice Sendak. If it hadn't been for his books, I might
> > have never have looked at art as carefully as I did. I used to copy
> > illustrator's art when I was a kid, wanting to draw like them. And
> > since so many were done in pen and ink, it was easier to see how they
> > were done, line by line. From there I branched out to other
> > illustrators, and eventually to traditional art history. but I have to
> > admit, until I went to college, I wasn't interested in traditional art
> > history paintings. but I had a wide collection of illustrators that I
> > admired. I still use many picture books in my art classes today as
> > examples of style and material use.
>diane
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Anyone from Kentucky?
>From: Christa Wise <cwise@remc7.k12.mi.us>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 13:29:42 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>Hi all ( and Judy, in case I don't get through to the list),
>I accidentally threw out my copies of Denise Hick's videos on Art
>History. "Art History I: A century of Modern Art" and "Art History
>II" which deals with classical European Art. To buy these would
>require over $800 which is obviously more than I can spend, but the
>series is downloaded for free from KET TV in Kentucky. As near as I
>can tell it will be block-fed on Monday, August 21. Is anyone in that
>state willing and able to download it for me. I will certainly pay
>for your trouble and your tape. If so, please contact me directly at:
>cwise@remc7.k12.mi.us
>
>Christa
>
>cwise@saugatuckps.com
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Guggenheim Study Suggests Arts Education Benefits Literacy
>Skills (New York Times)
>From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 10:36:43 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>This was a good article and I plan to use some aspects of the study
>during my upcoming six-week language arts subbing gig. I've been
>thinking of some ways to "sneak" art into the curriculum. BTW, I
>recently passed the state's English proficiency exam, so I'm considered
>"highly qualified" by NCLB standards to teach language arts.
>
>I'm always a bit leery about putting my e-mail address on unsecured
>online forms no matter what the privacy policy; I think spambots can
>capture it and then inundate you. You may be able to access this
>article through your local library, which is what I did. As a member I
>can access its databases and get complete articles for free from
>jillions of newspapers and magazines.
>
>Maggie
>
>Judy Decker wrote:
>
> > Dear Art Educators,
> >
> > This article appeared in New York Times. You will need to subscribe to
> > access the article on line. Subscription is FREE (online).
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Flooring issues
>From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 19:43:24 GMT
>X-Message-Number: 14
>
>I have a concrete floor in the art room and love it (although it can =
>
>be hard on the feet/legs sometimes). It cleans up well and every year =
>
>it gets a heavy duty cleaning over the summer and then resealed. =
>
>Originally it was supposed to be stained and then sealed, but they =
>
>forgot, didn't have the money or some other reason for not doing it! =
>
>Now I am thinking of having kids paint "rugs" of masterworks on the =
>
>floor this year before they reseal it again :-) =
>
>creatively, Linda in Oregon
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists who were/are heroes?
>From: Maggie Tucker <arttucker@earthlink.net>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 15:03:32 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 15
>
>How about Hollis Sigler? (female; naif painter from mid-West whose primary
>subject was breast cancer and its effects)
>Maggie Tucker
>
>arttucker@earthlink.net
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Using Technology in Art
>From: jenmcaleese@comcast.net
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 21:09:18 +0000
>X-Message-Number: 16
>
>Hi Everyone - thank you in advance for your guidance. We really need your
>input!
>
>Together with Dr. Slavko Milekic (University of the Arts, Phila.), we will
>be
>introducing SmArt Tools in September through November under the company
>name of
>FlatWorld Interactives. We are a software development company committed to
>developing interactive software for the education market. We globally
>connect
>kids to art through exciting new technology that is not yet available.
>
>For the first time in the history of human kind, globalization (flattening)
>of
>the world has made different art forms and works of art from various
>cultures
>readily accessible. However, access to this information is currently
>fairly
>abstract and non-experiential. Creating tools that would allow active
>(experiential) interaction with various art forms will significantly
>increase
>the beneficial effect of exposure to the arts.
>
>Our mission is to create tools and environments that would allow
>experiential
>interaction with various art forms in the digital medium. These tools are
>based
>on current research findings in cognitive science and the use of art in
>education. We know our interactive software has to be experiential, based
>on
>emerging technologies and inexpensive to ensure global affordability and
>accessibility.
>
>Our first SmArt Tool kit will include slide choice juxtaposition,
>annotation,
>transparency, rotation and flipping (horizontal & vertical) for an
>approximate
>price of $25.
>
>You may further enhance your basic tool program with advanced SmArt Tools
>such
>as the talking magnifying glass, memory identification, key hole
>observation,
>composition, 3D object manipulation, palette analysis and guided
>exploration.
>These specialized tools will sell for approximately $15-$18 each. All of
>the
>advanced tools will be available for purchase at a discounted price yet to
>be
>determined. An additional price break will be given for the purchase of
>the
>basic and advanced tools together.
>
>Lesson plans utilizing the teaching tools will be introduced after our
>initial
>product launch. For this we will definitely need your art curriculum
>ideas.
>
>This is where we really need your advice. Please share your thoughts
>regarding
>the following questions:
>
>-Do you teach art using a desk top, lap top, Smart Board (interactive
>whiteboard)or any other touch sensitive surface?
>-If you do not use technology to teach art, will you consider doing so?
>-For teaching purposes, do you have access to a desk top, lap top or Smart
>Board
>(interactive white board)?
>-Do you have a budget to buy supplies/teaching aids (including software)?
>-Would you spend your own money to buy cool software to help you teach art?
>-Are you comfortable with the product pricing we discussed above?
>-In purchasing the software we plan on offering a rebate. Customers can
>either
>accept it in the form of a cash rebate or customer contribution to an
>existing
>global non profit focused on helping children gain access to the arts. Is
>the
>non profit idea something you would choose?
>-Please share with us your knowledge about connecting to other art
>educators
>outside of PAEA?
>
>
>We truly appreciate your ideas and inputs. We just found out that we
>missed the
>NAEA conference proposal submission deadline and are so disappointed. Oh
>well,
>we will still attend. Our website will be up and running in early
>September for
>you to demo our products. Until then, you can visit Dr. Milekic on his
>website,
>www.uarts.edu/faculty/smilekic.
>
>Please add any other thoughts/comments. Our products are good for
>students. To
>enhance the learning experience of students, we need your input to make our
>products even better. Thank you so much for your time.
>
>Jennifer McAleese
>jenmcaleese@comcast.net
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Using Technology in Art
>From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 15:57:47 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 17
>
>This sounds really cool (kewl). I think you have a very good idea. I
>teach art
>education methods courses and I think my students would find this very
>interesting....
>
>thanks for sharing...Please come to Texas and exhibit your product at our
>fall
>conference! It is in Ft. Worth this year.
>
>Cheers,
>
>Diane
>--
>Dr. Diane C. Gregory
>
>
>
>Quoting jenmcaleese@comcast.net:
>
> > Hi Everyone - thank you in advance for your guidance. We really need
>your
> > input!
> >
> > Together with Dr. Slavko Milekic (University of the Arts, Phila.), we
>will be
> > introducing SmArt Tools in September through November under the company
>name
> > of
> > FlatWorld Interactives. We are a software development company committed
>to
> > developing interactive software for the education market. We globally
> > connect
> > kids to art through exciting new technology that is not yet available.
> >
> > For the first time in the history of human kind, globalization
>(flattening)
> > of
> > the world has made different art forms and works of art from various
>cultures
> > readily accessible. However, access to this information is currently
>fairly
> > abstract and non-experiential. Creating tools that would allow active
> > (experiential) interaction with various art forms will significantly
>increase
> > the beneficial effect of exposure to the arts.
> >
> > Our mission is to create tools and environments that would allow
>experiential
> > interaction with various art forms in the digital medium. These tools
>are
> > based
> > on current research findings in cognitive science and the use of art in
> > education. We know our interactive software has to be experiential,
>based on
> > emerging technologies and inexpensive to ensure global affordability and
> > accessibility.
> >
> > Our first SmArt Tool kit will include slide choice juxtaposition,
>annotation,
> > transparency, rotation and flipping (horizontal & vertical) for an
> > approximate
> > price of $25.
> >
> > You may further enhance your basic tool program with advanced SmArt
>Tools
> > such
> > as the talking magnifying glass, memory identification, key hole
>observation,
> > composition, 3D object manipulation, palette analysis and guided
>exploration.
> > These specialized tools will sell for approximately $15-$18 each. All
>of the
> > advanced tools will be available for purchase at a discounted price yet
>to be
> > determined. An additional price break will be given for the purchase of
>the
> > basic and advanced tools together.
> >
> > Lesson plans utilizing the teaching tools will be introduced after our
> > initial
> > product launch. For this we will definitely need your art curriculum
>ideas.
> >
> > This is where we really need your advice. Please share your thoughts
> > regarding
> > the following questions:
> >
> > -Do you teach art using a desk top, lap top, Smart Board (interactive
> > whiteboard)or any other touch sensitive surface?
> > -If you do not use technology to teach art, will you consider doing so?
> > -For teaching purposes, do you have access to a desk top, lap top or
>Smart
> > Board
> > (interactive white board)?
> > -Do you have a budget to buy supplies/teaching aids (including
>software)?
> > -Would you spend your own money to buy cool software to help you teach
>art?
> > -Are you comfortable with the product pricing we discussed above?
> > -In purchasing the software we plan on offering a rebate. Customers can
> > either
> > accept it in the form of a cash rebate or customer contribution to an
> > existing
> > global non profit focused on helping children gain access to the arts.
>Is
> > the
> > non profit idea something you would choose?
> > -Please share with us your knowledge about connecting to other art
>educators
> > outside of PAEA?
> >
> >
> > We truly appreciate your ideas and inputs. We just found out that we
>missed
> > the
> > NAEA conference proposal submission deadline and are so disappointed.
>Oh
> > well,
> > we will still attend. Our website will be up and running in early
>September
> > for
> > you to demo our products. Until then, you can visit Dr. Milekic on his
> > website,
> > www.uarts.edu/faculty/smilekic.
> >
> > Please add any other thoughts/comments. Our products are good for
>students.
> > To
> > enhance the learning experience of students, we need your input to make
>our
> > products even better. Thank you so much for your time.
> >
> > Jennifer McAleese
> > jenmcaleese@comcast.net
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Using Technology in Art
>From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 16:21:37 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 18
>
>Wow, great idea.
>
>Would be nice to see interactive art software to be
>developed for the classroom and student use.
>
>I use a stand alone computer in my classroom and
>computer lab with students in my art classroom. We
>have been using EMacs (Lab) and I have a G4 Mac in my
>classroom. This year the lab has been changed over to
>Dell computers.
>
>On the computer students do research for art projects,
>explore interactive museum sites, look at other
>schools art links, read articles and use production
>software like Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Frontpage,
>IMovie etc. Students also use interactive Art DVD's.
>
>What type of computer would your software run on?
>
>The question I would ask about your software is what
>purpose does it serve. Is it a production software, a
>reinforcement software. Is it to be used for the
>understanding of Art History, Cultural Art, Elements
>and Principles of Design. Does the software help
>teachers, students align themselves to the National
>Art Standards/State Art Standards. Does the software
>take into consideration all the different learning
>styles and offer students choices? Can the software
>be used at different grade levels? Can the level of
>the software be altered by the user? Offering a
>student a challenge is important.
>
>The price is reasonable and I think affordable.
>
>Will be interesting to see what you come up with in
>the end.
>
>Jeff Pridie
>
>--- jenmcaleese@comcast.net wrote:
>
> > Hi Everyone - thank you in advance for your
> > guidance. We really need your
> > input!
> >
> > Together with Dr. Slavko Milekic (University of the
> > Arts, Phila.), we will be
> > introducing SmArt Tools in September through
> > November under the company name of
> > FlatWorld Interactives. We are a software
> > development company committed to
> > developing interactive software for the education
> > market. We globally connect
> > kids to art through exciting new technology that is
> > not yet available.
> >
> > For the first time in the history of human kind,
> > globalization (flattening) of
> > the world has made different art forms and works of
> > art from various cultures
> > readily accessible. However, access to this
> > information is currently fairly
> > abstract and non-experiential. Creating tools that
> > would allow active
> > (experiential) interaction with various art forms
> > will significantly increase
> > the beneficial effect of exposure to the arts.
> >
> > Our mission is to create tools and environments that
> > would allow experiential
> > interaction with various art forms in the digital
> > medium. These tools are based
> > on current research findings in cognitive science
> > and the use of art in
> > education. We know our interactive software has to
> > be experiential, based on
> > emerging technologies and inexpensive to ensure
> > global affordability and
> > accessibility.
> >
> > Our first SmArt Tool kit will include slide choice
> > juxtaposition, annotation,
> > transparency, rotation and flipping (horizontal &
> > vertical) for an approximate
> > price of $25.
> >
> > You may further enhance your basic tool program with
> > advanced SmArt Tools such
> > as the talking magnifying glass, memory
> > identification, key hole observation,
> > composition, 3D object manipulation, palette
> > analysis and guided exploration.
> > These specialized tools will sell for approximately
> > $15-$18 each. All of the
> > advanced tools will be available for purchase at a
> > discounted price yet to be
> > determined. An additional price break will be given
> > for the purchase of the
> > basic and advanced tools together.
> >
> > Lesson plans utilizing the teaching tools will be
> > introduced after our initial
> > product launch. For this we will definitely need
> > your art curriculum ideas.
> >
> > This is where we really need your advice. Please
> > share your thoughts regarding
> > the following questions:
> >
> > -Do you teach art using a desk top, lap top, Smart
> > Board (interactive
> > whiteboard)or any other touch sensitive surface?
> > -If you do not use technology to teach art, will you
> > consider doing so?
> > -For teaching purposes, do you have access to a desk
> > top, lap top or Smart Board
> > (interactive white board)?
> > -Do you have a budget to buy supplies/teaching aids
> > (including software)?
> > -Would you spend your own money to buy cool software
> > to help you teach art?
> > -Are you comfortable with the product pricing we
> > discussed above?
> > -In purchasing the software we plan on offering a
> > rebate. Customers can either
> > accept it in the form of a cash rebate or customer
> > contribution to an existing
> > global non profit focused on helping children gain
> > access to the arts. Is the
> > non profit idea something you would choose?
> > -Please share with us your knowledge about
> > connecting to other art educators
> > outside of PAEA?
> >
> >
> > We truly appreciate your ideas and inputs. We just
> > found out that we missed the
> > NAEA conference proposal submission deadline and are
> > so disappointed. Oh well,
> > we will still attend. Our website will be up and
> > running in early September for
> > you to demo our products. Until then, you can visit
> > Dr. Milekic on his website,
> > www.uarts.edu/faculty/smilekic.
> >
> > Please add any other thoughts/comments. Our
> > products are good for students. To
> > enhance the learning experience of students, we need
> > your input to make our
> > products even better. Thank you so much for your
> > time.
> >
> > Jennifer McAleese
> > jenmcaleese@comcast.net
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Using Technology in Art
>From: jenmcaleese@comcast.net
>Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 00:32:51 +0000
>X-Message-Number: 19
>
>Thanks Diane for your input and suggestion to come to Texas. We will keep
>you posted when we introduce the software. jen
> -------------- Original message ----------------------
>From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> > This sounds really cool (kewl). I think you have a very good idea. I
>teach art
> > education methods courses and I think my students would find this very
> > interesting....
> >
> > thanks for sharing...Please come to Texas and exhibit your product at
>our fall
> > conference! It is in Ft. Worth this year.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Diane
> > --
> > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> >
> >
> >
> > Quoting jenmcaleese@comcast.net:
> >
> > > Hi Everyone - thank you in advance for your guidance. We really need
>your
> > > input!
> > >
> > > Together with Dr. Slavko Milekic (University of the Arts, Phila.), we
>will be
> > > introducing SmArt Tools in September through November under the
>company name
> > > of
> > > FlatWorld Interactives. We are a software development company
>committed to
> > > developing interactive software for the education market. We globally
> > > connect
> > > kids to art through exciting new technology that is not yet available.
> > >
> > > For the first time in the history of human kind, globalization
>(flattening)
> > > of
> > > the world has made different art forms and works of art from various
>cultures
> > > readily accessible. However, access to this information is currently
>fairly
> > > abstract and non-experiential. Creating tools that would allow active
> > > (experiential) interaction with various art forms will significantly
>increase
> > > the beneficial effect of exposure to the arts.
> > >
> > > Our mission is to create tools and environments that would allow
>experiential
> > > interaction with various art forms in the digital medium. These tools
>are
> > > based
> > > on current research findings in cognitive science and the use of art
>in
> > > education. We know our interactive software has to be experiential,
>based on
> > > emerging technologies and inexpensive to ensure global affordability
>and
> > > accessibility.
> > >
> > > Our first SmArt Tool kit will include slide choice juxtaposition,
>annotation,
> > > transparency, rotation and flipping (horizontal & vertical) for an
> > > approximate
> > > price of $25.
> > >
> > > You may further enhance your basic tool program with advanced SmArt
>Tools
> > > such
> > > as the talking magnifying glass, memory identification, key hole
>observation,
> > > composition, 3D object manipulation, palette analysis and guided
>exploration.
> > > These specialized tools will sell for approximately $15-$18 each. All
>of the
> > > advanced tools will be available for purchase at a discounted price
>yet to be
> > > determined. An additional price break will be given for the purchase
>of the
> > > basic and advanced tools together.
> > >
> > > Lesson plans utilizing the teaching tools will be introduced after our
> > > initial
> > > product launch. For this we will definitely need your art curriculum
>ideas.
> > >
> > > This is where we really need your advice. Please share your thoughts
> > > regarding
> > > the following questions:
> > >
> > > -Do you teach art using a desk top, lap top, Smart Board (interactive
> > > whiteboard)or any other touch sensitive surface?
> > > -If you do not use technology to teach art, will you consider doing
>so?
> > > -For teaching purposes, do you have access to a desk top, lap top or
>Smart
> > > Board
> > > (interactive white board)?
> > > -Do you have a budget to buy supplies/teaching aids (including
>software)?
> > > -Would you spend your own money to buy cool software to help you teach
>art?
> > > -Are you comfortable with the product pricing we discussed above?
> > > -In purchasing the software we plan on offering a rebate. Customers
>can
> > > either
> > > accept it in the form of a cash rebate or customer contribution to an
> > > existing
> > > global non profit focused on helping children gain access to the arts.
> Is
> > > the
> > > non profit idea something you would choose?
> > > -Please share with us your knowledge about connecting to other art
>educators
> > > outside of PAEA?
> > >
> > >
> > > We truly appreciate your ideas and inputs. We just found out that we
>missed
> > > the
> > > NAEA conference proposal submission deadline and are so disappointed.
>Oh
> > > well,
> > > we will still attend. Our website will be up and running in early
>September
> > > for
> > > you to demo our products. Until then, you can visit Dr. Milekic on
>his
> > > website,
> > > www.uarts.edu/faculty/smilekic.
> > >
> > > Please add any other thoughts/comments. Our products are good for
>students.
> > > To
> > > enhance the learning experience of students, we need your input to
>make our
> > > products even better. Thank you so much for your time.
> > >
> > > Jennifer McAleese
> > > jenmcaleese@comcast.net
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > > To unsubscribe go to
> > > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Using Technology in Art
>From: jenmcaleese@comcast.net
>Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 00:38:19 +0000
>X-Message-Number: 20
>
>Hi Jeff - thank you for your message. I will definitely return with
>answers. Just walked in the door. jen
> -------------- Original message ----------------------
>From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> > Wow, great idea.
> >
> > Would be nice to see interactive art software to be
> > developed for the classroom and student use.
> >
> > I use a stand alone computer in my classroom and
> > computer lab with students in my art classroom. We
> > have been using EMacs (Lab) and I have a G4 Mac in my
> > classroom. This year the lab has been changed over to
> > Dell computers.
> >
> > On the computer students do research for art projects,
> > explore interactive museum sites, look at other
> > schools art links, read articles and use production
> > software like Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Frontpage,
> > IMovie etc. Students also use interactive Art DVD's.
> >
> > What type of computer would your software run on?
> >
> > The question I would ask about your software is what
> > purpose does it serve. Is it a production software, a
> > reinforcement software. Is it to be used for the
> > understanding of Art History, Cultural Art, Elements
> > and Principles of Design. Does the software help
> > teachers, students align themselves to the National
> > Art Standards/State Art Standards. Does the software
> > take into consideration all the different learning
> > styles and offer students choices? Can the software
> > be used at different grade levels? Can the level of
> > the software be altered by the user? Offering a
> > student a challenge is important.
> >
> > The price is reasonable and I think affordable.
> >
> > Will be interesting to see what you come up with in
> > the end.
> >
> > Jeff Pridie
> >
> > --- jenmcaleese@comcast.net wrote:
> >
> > > Hi Everyone - thank you in advance for your
> > > guidance. We really need your
> > > input!
> > >
> > > Together with Dr. Slavko Milekic (University of the
> > > Arts, Phila.), we will be
> > > introducing SmArt Tools in September through
> > > November under the company name of
> > > FlatWorld Interactives. We are a software
> > > development company committed to
> > > developing interactive software for the education
> > > market. We globally connect
> > > kids to art through exciting new technology that is
> > > not yet available.
> > >
> > > For the first time in the history of human kind,
> > > globalization (flattening) of
> > > the world has made different art forms and works of
> > > art from various cultures
> > > readily accessible. However, access to this
> > > information is currently fairly
> > > abstract and non-experiential. Creating tools that
> > > would allow active
> > > (experiential) interaction with various art forms
> > > will significantly increase
> > > the beneficial effect of exposure to the arts.
> > >
> > > Our mission is to create tools and environments that
> > > would allow experiential
> > > interaction with various art forms in the digital
> > > medium. These tools are based
> > > on current research findings in cognitive science
> > > and the use of art in
> > > education. We know our interactive software has to
> > > be experiential, based on
> > > emerging technologies and inexpensive to ensure
> > > global affordability and
> > > accessibility.
> > >
> > > Our first SmArt Tool kit will include slide choice
> > > juxtaposition, annotation,
> > > transparency, rotation and flipping (horizontal &
> > > vertical) for an approximate
> > > price of $25.
> > >
> > > You may further enhance your basic tool program with
> > > advanced SmArt Tools such
> > > as the talking magnifying glass, memory
> > > identification, key hole observation,
> > > composition, 3D object manipulation, palette
> > > analysis and guided exploration.
> > > These specialized tools will sell for approximately
> > > $15-$18 each. All of the
> > > advanced tools will be available for purchase at a
> > > discounted price yet to be
> > > determined. An additional price break will be given
> > > for the purchase of the
> > > basic and advanced tools together.
> > >
> > > Lesson plans utilizing the teaching tools will be
> > > introduced after our initial
> > > product launch. For this we will definitely need
> > > your art curriculum ideas.
> > >
> > > This is where we really need your advice. Please
> > > share your thoughts regarding
> > > the following questions:
> > >
> > > -Do you teach art using a desk top, lap top, Smart
> > > Board (interactive
> > > whiteboard)or any other touch sensitive surface?
> > > -If you do not use technology to teach art, will you
> > > consider doing so?
> > > -For teaching purposes, do you have access to a desk
> > > top, lap top or Smart Board
> > > (interactive white board)?
> > > -Do you have a budget to buy supplies/teaching aids
> > > (including software)?
> > > -Would you spend your own money to buy cool software
> > > to help you teach art?
> > > -Are you comfortable with the product pricing we
> > > discussed above?
> > > -In purchasing the software we plan on offering a
> > > rebate. Customers can either
> > > accept it in the form of a cash rebate or customer
> > > contribution to an existing
> > > global non profit focused on helping children gain
> > > access to the arts. Is the
> > > non profit idea something you would choose?
> > > -Please share with us your knowledge about
> > > connecting to other art educators
> > > outside of PAEA?
> > >
> > >
> > > We truly appreciate your ideas and inputs. We just
> > > found out that we missed the
> > > NAEA conference proposal submission deadline and are
> > > so disappointed. Oh well,
> > > we will still attend. Our website will be up and
> > > running in early September for
> > > you to demo our products. Until then, you can visit
> > > Dr. Milekic on his website,
> > > www.uarts.edu/faculty/smilekic.
> > >
> > > Please add any other thoughts/comments. Our
> > > products are good for students. To
> > > enhance the learning experience of students, we need
> > > your input to make our
> > > products even better. Thank you so much for your
> > > time.
> > >
> > > Jennifer McAleese
> > > jenmcaleese@comcast.net
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > > To unsubscribe go to
> > >
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> > >
> >
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: table coverings for clay
>From: StacieMich@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 21:20:46 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 21
>
>In a message dated 7/27/2006 8:30:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time, jvilenski
>writes:
>Instead, I use 6x6 plywood or masonite boards
>for individual projects, the type of boards sold for
>craft projects.
>Do the boards warp?
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: table coverings for clay
>From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
>Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2006 20:21:18 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 22
>
>I have used the boards and I recommend using tempered Masonite
>boards...they are
>smooth and won't leave a texture. They do not warp. However, you do need
>to
>keep them clean. I recommend keeping them small around 8 x 10 so you can
>easily get them in a sink to clean. Dust, though is still a problem.
>These
>boards are portable and the clay doesn't stick, unless the student uses way
>too
>much water...which is a common problem. You can get Masonite boards that
>are
>rough on one side and tempered on the other...these are cheaper. I prefer
>the
>1/4 inch thick board...these don't warp. They are more expensive though.
>If
>you get them 14 x 20 you can use them as drawing boards, too. However, you
>have to have big sink. It is very important to keep down the dust and keep
>the
>boards clean.
>--
>Dr. Diane C. Gregory
>
>
>Quoting StacieMich@aol.com:
>
> > In a message dated 7/27/2006 8:30:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time, jvilenski
> > writes:
> > Instead, I use 6x6 plywood or masonite boards
> > for individual projects, the type of boards sold for
> > craft projects.
> > Do the boards warp?
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Using Technology in Art
>From: jenmcaleese@comcast.net
>Date: Fri, 28 Jul 2006 02:40:01 +0000
>X-Message-Number: 23
>
>Jeff- hope this answers some of your questions. Thank you for inquiring
>and for your invaluable input...jen
>
> the software should run on Mac OS 8.5-9.x and also Mac OS X, Windows 98,
>2000, Me, XP;
>- general purpose tools (SmArt Tools) would allow teaching (ideally with a
>computer projector, even better with the SmartBoard) of any aspect of Art
>Education, from Art History, Cultural Art, to Elements and Principles of
>Design.. you can think of these tools as PowerPoint designed specifically
>for Art Education. Thus, it is mostly a teacher's tool, designed to allow
>an art teacher to deliver sophisticated lesson plans on any topic... the
>software comes with an example lesson plan that illustrates its potential
>uses;
>- specialized tools would allow an art teacher to create interactive,
>exploratory environments for students. An example is a 'context sensitive
>magnifying glass' -- it would allow close inspection (using a magnifying
>glass) of any (digitized) work of art and, depending on the detail being
>examined, will deliver either a voice commentary (recorded by the teacher),
>or explanatory text. Possible use would include creating a hands-on
>exercise, where students examine by themselves different works of art and,
>based on their own exploration, have to write an essay, answer specific
>questions, etc.
>- the software is compatible with National/State Art Standards as long as
>lesson plans and interactive exercises are designed (by the art teacher)
>with these standards in mind
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>carltoonz@hotmail.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu

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