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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 25, 2006

---------

From: Maureen (mmorris_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Jul 26 2006 - 10:16:03 PDT


In regards to a suitable surface for working clay, most ceramic studios have
tables that are permanently covered with canvas. In classrooms, we do not
have that luxury. The ideas I have read so far are all really good. I have
found much success with using individual boards, varnished or not, for
students to work on. When in process, they simply wrap their work and boards
for storage. Once the pieces are sufficiently dry, they can be easily
removed from board to drying racks. When not in use, they can be stored
away. I found that there were not as many accidents. Mo

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2006 1:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 25, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, July 25, 2006.

1. Kids Love CLAY!
2. Re: Clay tips/Stacie
3. artist statements at the elem level.
4. Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed :)
5. Table covers for clay
6. Design Web site - downloadable posters
7. Re: Ceramic Room Tips
8. RE: Ceramic Room Tips
9. Re: Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed :)
10. problem with digest
11. problem posting?
12. Spiral Art Education - articles and lesson plans (Excellent site)
13. Re: [teacherartexchange]clay
14. Ideas for first week of school
15. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 24, 2006
16. Re: Ceramic Room Tips- long post
17. Re: more ceramics tips
18. Favorite Clay "tool"
19. Re: problem with digest
20. Re: problem with digest
21. Re: Favorite Clay "tool"

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kids Love CLAY!
From: "leah rachlis" <leah@pcisys.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 07:08:04 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

I don't ahve too much to add to the clay unit discussion - as I am not too
far ahead of Stacie - BUT...

1) I would hold off on the wheel, espeically if your jsut starting, I have
been thowing for almost a year, and I am still not ready to do it with a
group of kids yet...

there is SO much you can do with handbuilding.

as far as work surface - I am one with VERY limted space - I use the plastic

type of table place mats... and then I have these strips of really heavy
plastic bags I cut up. They are the super thick dark green garbage bags
(expensive garbage bags but cheep work surfaces). the kids can each ahve
one under their work, they pick up ans slip easily into a plastic bag - they

clean up great, and if something happens to them - I really don't care.

I keep the placemat on the table (more for table coverage) - we make the
progression from pinch pots to slab projects through out elementary school -

the big hit is pinch pot animals... but I like slab boxes myself.

I do not have wheels (or room for wheels) in my itty bitty classroom - but I

take my own classes at a studio down town that has 7 wheels - i am thinking
I might take my Middle School kids down there on an outing and have my
instructor give them a lesson...

I would love to teach clay all day - but I would need to invest in bit
buckets of hand cream - when I finish a unit, my hands are horrible!

Have fun!

Leah

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Clay tips/Stacie
From: "Rick Larson" <jrlarson51@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 09:25:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

I use canvas, and what happens is that I have the kids tap the crumbs in the

bucket when they're finished, then fold the canvas and put it back into a
storage box( old copy paper box). I have never wiped or cleaned them, When

the kids get them out to work again, and dry crumbs just get tapped into the

garbage.
Betsy
----- Original Message -----
From: <StacieMich@aol.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2006 10:29 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Clay tips/Stacie

> In a message dated 7/24/2006 1:38:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time, marcia
> writes:
> Stacie,
> Here are some ideas for clay projects/management.
> This is what I do with the middle school
> level/elementary level, but I bet it would help with
> the high school level too.
>
> thanks for the great tips Marcia, especially the vinegar one. This just
> happened at the camp. Some kids broke pieces off of their greenware bird
> projects, and the teacher told them that nothing could be done. Good to
> know that
> there might be a solution after all! They use canvas at the camp, and it
> works
> well. I was just wondering about washing it. Do you hose it down every
> so
> often or do you actually wash it? I'm worried about ruining my washer at
> home,
> but I know how important it is to keep the room as dust free as possible.
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: artist statements at the elem level.
From: "Rick Larson" <jrlarson51@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 09:29:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

I have my elem kids do what they can to describe their work, note any
elements and principals they used- I say it has to be at least 5 sentences.
I also sometimes have them make a 'quote' to accompany their work.- like
when we do work that involves flowers. They can pick one from the list,
crediting the origional author, or create their own.
Betsy
Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 22, 2006

> Does anyone have examples of artist statements for elementary students to
> use with their work as it is displayed.
>
> Thank you.
>
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed :)
From: "Christine Besack" <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 10:03:54 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Hi All,
 I will be teaching Kindergarten Art for the first time this year in
addition to my regular class load. (They are just sooooooooooo young !!!!!)

It is amazing the strides they make in that first year of school. I have
always just taught grades 1-6.

I know their maximum attention span for a project is 15 minutes. So I will
have to be on my toes to fill 40 minutes once a week.

Please help !!!!!
Thanks in advance,
Christine Besack :)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Table covers for clay
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 11:00:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

TABLE COVERS
I have found that pieces of Tyvec House Wrap made for the building trade by
DuPont work well as table covers while working with clay.

SLAB WORK
Tyvec also works well for slab making (put the clay between two layers and
dance on it in your socks). Peel off the top Tyvec, turn it over, peel off
the other side, put it on the floor and dance again until the slab is ready.
It works great as a hanging sling in which to allow bent slabs to become
leatherhard in preparation for larger, more creative slab assemblages and
fabrications. Hang them from wires attached to the classroom ceiling grid.

CLEANING
Tyvec can be sponged clean or hand washed and laid out or hung to dry. I
have not put peices in a washing machine, but I think they would withstand a
gentle cold water cycle. Clay does not seem to be a problem for washing
machines. A similar material is sold as mailing envelops, but it is not as
thick and is too small for clay work.

WHERE TO GET IT
Tyvek House Wrap is sold in huge roles by building supply firms, but I get
it free at construction sites. After a house is wrapped they cut out and
discard the pieces where the windows and doors are placed.

Marvin
-------------------------------
Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Emeritus Professor of Art
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171

links about teaching ceramics
http://www.goshen.edu/art/DeptPgs/CerLinks.htm
learning to throw
http://www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/throw/cover39.html
art teaching links
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html

"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a
kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Design Web site - downloadable posters
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 11:20:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Art Educators,

Rebecca B. posted this to Art Education list:
http://www.baddesignkills.com/

In the Propaganda section, you will find some posters to download and
print off for your graphic design students. Here are some of the
posters Rebecca posted:
PRACTICE SAFE DESIGN, ALWAYS USE A CONCEPT and TURN YOUR COMPUTER
ON----That one has a graphic of a brain with a computer mouse
attached. Another is a large graphic of pencil with a broken computer
mouse wound around it and the large type reads: SAVE
YOURSELF---SKETCH.

There was a real situation where bad design killed. In the Dusseldorf
Airport fire of 1996, 17 people died and many were injured. They
couldn't find their way out to safety because the signs where so
poorly designed. Signs were confusing even when not under stress.

I will be adding a link to this on Incredible Art Resources.

Regards,

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ceramic Room Tips
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 15:38:36 GMT
X-Message-Number: 7

Eileen, I found some cigar boxes from the Casual Living U.S.A. catalog =

~ although I didn't see any on their web site =

http://www.casuallivingusa.com 1-800-843-1881

creatively, Linda in Oregon

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Subject: RE: Ceramic Room Tips
From: "Linda White" <linda.c.white@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 10:54:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

Almost every store (wal mart, target, the grocery story) has those plastic
boxes for kids school supplies at their desks on sale now (Back to School
sales, oh my. They are usually about a dollar a piece. A few years ago I
got them for ten cents each after school started. Linda in OK

My high school students liked having tool kits. I put needed tools in cigar
boxes and numbered them.

That's a good idea...Maybe I can get some boxes. I could laminate a
inventory list to put on top. Did you double check their boxes or did you
trust them
to do it?

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed
:)
From: "Eileen Eileen" <iforget000@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 13:57:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9
This is a test reply from Eileen Ellis
Art teacher K-8 St Richard School in Ohio
This may not work so I will send a seperate message
directly to your e-mail.
Eileen
On 7/25/06, Christine Besack <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net> wrote:
> Hi All,
>  I will be teaching Kindergarten Art for the first time this year in
> addition to my regular class load. (They are just sooooooooooo young
!!!!!)
>
> It is amazing the strides they make in that first year of school. I have
> always just taught grades 1-6.
>
> I know their maximum attention span for a project is 15 minutes. So I will
> have to be on my toes to fill 40 minutes once a week.
>
> Please help !!!!!
> Thanks in advance,
> Christine Besack :)
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: problem with digest
From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 11:02:39 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10
Linda emailed me and she is having problems posting. 
I think we had talked about this before. Can anyone
remember how to solve the problem with posts not going
through?
" Every time I send my inquiry to the address it is
returned.  I am receiving the postings, but cannot
transmit.  I chose to get the messages as a group.  I
have a new job as an early childhood arts coordinator
and would really like to begin a dialogue with others.
 What is your process for posting messages?  I have
tried to contact Getty Museum directly, but with no
luck.  Thank you.
 
Linda Ehrlich
Pre-K Arts Coordinator
Pittsburgh Public Schools
412.488.4590
lehrlich1@pghboe.net"
If you like reading and want to swap books with other people for free, check
out this club that I'm a part of!  It's awesome.. I already got 3 free
books.  If you use this link to join, I will get a free book credit. 
 
http://www.paperbackswap.com/index.php?n=2&r_by=toolgirl2%40yahoo.com
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http://mail.yahoo.com 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: problem posting?
From: Ann Ayers <art304@bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 15:01:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11
make sure your message is in "plain text" - it should go thru.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Spiral Art Education - articles and lesson plans (Excellent site)
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 15:10:22 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
Dear Art Educators,
Here is a site worth mentioning again. Shellee sent this link to me. I
do have it linked on Incredible Art Department/Incredible Art
Resources.
Spiral Art Education from University of Illinois Chicago:
http://www.uic.edu/classes/ad/ad382/index.html
Here are the lesson plans - include student examples:
http://www.uic.edu/classes/ad/ad382/sites/Projects/P_index.html
Articles on Art Education/Curriculum:
http://www.uic.edu/classes/ad/ad382/sites/AEA/AEA_index.html
Shellee particularly liked this article:
Investigating the Culture of Curriculum
by Olivia Gude
http://www.uic.edu/classes/ad/ad382/sites/AEA/AEA_01/AAEA01a.html
This is a site that is definitely worth your time.
Regards,
Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange]clay
From: pam smith <thinkart2003@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 13:07:11 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 13
I am still working on this project. The ideas really
help. One other thing I do..
I save the wrappers from the copy paper. Some, not
all, are coated with a light waxy surface. The
students use these to roll out their slabs. I just
have them deposit remants in the recycle box. If they
are not done at the end of one class they can up the
whole thing on cardboard and in a large one or two
gallon zip lock bag. They are making REALLY big zip
locks now. I have the kids bring their own.
Pam 
(from Hilo)
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http://mail.yahoo.com 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Ideas for first week of school
From: "Marybeth Bortzfield" <zbort@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 16:34:05 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
Hi Everyone,
I am beginning to formulate plans for the new school year and I was 
wondering what other art teachers do during the first week of school?  I 
teach K-5, after introducing the room, reviewing expectations and playing 
observant artists look and see what is different, I have had my 3-5 students
assemble a sketch book and illustrate the cover.   K-2 usually illustrate a 
summer activity they have done or something about their experiences during 
the first day or week of school.  I'm ready for a change and I am looking 
for some creative fun ice breakers for the first week.  My classes meet once
a week for one hour, except for K who I have for only 1/2 hour.
I also have a student teacher beginning the first day of school (my first 
one!)
Any suggestions for the first week?
I have a suggestion for the clay postings too!,
Ceramic Supply in Lodi, NJ supplies the most beautiful clay!  My elementary 
school students never have to worry about wedging to eliminate unwanted air 
pockets.  Also, styrofoam meat trays which have been disinfected with a run 
through in the dishwasher or if you are lucky clean ones donated from a 
local grocery store, are great for individual work stations and storing work
in progress inside a plastic bag, along with the damp cloth for humidity.  I
recycle the bags (heavy duty) from my clay blocks from Ceramic Supply, we 
use masking tape to close the end and write names and class on the tape for 
easy identification.  Storage space for work is the only trick! 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 24, 2006
From: Heidi McElroy <hmcelroy@naxs.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 16:44:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
RE: clay tool storage
How about buying those plastic pencil storage boxers to hold clay tools.
K=Mart and Walmart run specials on them before school opens. In the past I
have gotten them for 50 cents apiece.
Don't forget dental floss for cutting clay. It works as well as those wire
cutters you buy (that break all too soon).
I put buckets of soapy water on students tables toward the end of class to
prewash their hands so less clay goes to the trap.  If students are pressed
for time, clay tools go in here also to soak and be rinsed later.
Heidi in VA
On 7/25/06 ....
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Ceramic Room Tips- long post
From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 14:28:19 -0700
X-Message-Number: 16
StacieMich@aol.com wrote:
>I plan on making some plaster molds for 
>recycling the clay, but I hadn't thought of making little ones for the 
>students.  <snip>
>
Molds?  Or bats for wedging?
>  I 
>was trying to think of a way to assign chores.  I like your system.  how do
you 
>break them up...tool collection, clay collection, wiping down
tables...things 
>like that?  Or should I have them work as teams at their tables and have
them 
>rotate?  Did you ever teach the wheel?  I'm thinking of only doing a few
weeks 
>of it because it's so messy, and I'm not very good at it...maybe having one
>of the members from the league come in to do a demo.  I think that I should
>focus more on handbuilding projects.
>
The poster I made had chores like Tools (collecting and cleaning); 
Counters; Bats/Wedging table; Sink; Floor.  Two people were assigned to 
each chore.  Those who did not have chores assigned had to clean their 
own tables.  It would take a couple of weeks to run them all through the 
different chores and I had to closely monitor and coach them to do it 
right; sink and floor had to wait 'til the other chores were done.  
Wheelies had to clean the wheel they used.  I never actually washed the 
canvas pieces; the students could shake them out outside.  I could throw 
a reasonable-looking pot, but the students were really wowed when the 
FOOTBALL coach came to do a demo.  That's right; he'd taken a lot of 
ceramics in college--and more recently than I--and was always willing to 
come and in show the kids.  I think they were thinking, "Well, of course 
Ms. White can do it good; but Coach ROCK?!  If he can do it, so can I!"  
Don't worry about not being a great thrower.  You still know more than 
your students.  You know the basics of centering, opening, and pulling 
up walls and you can coach them how to do it right.  I did 
hand-over-hand with them so they could feel how much pressure to use.  
Let them keep their first pot, no matter how awkward (as long as you can 
cut it from the wheelhead), then insist on a better one for their next.  
I found a very good little book with good illustrations that the 
students could look at called Throwing Pots, by Phil Rogers, published 
by A&C Black.  I got it from Sheffield Pottery.
Start collecting lots of cleaning rags; a friend gave me a whole bunch 
of towels used for surgery (no, they weren't bloodstained) that held up 
forever.  I used to wash them, along with the aprons, in the machines 
used by the P.E. dept. and janitors.  If you belong to Costco you can 
buy a big bag of pink "shop towels" so you always have a supply of clean 
ones.  They bleed like crazy the first time you wash them, so be careful.
Maggie
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: more ceramics tips
From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 14:37:24 -0700
X-Message-Number: 17
Ahh, Heidi brought up something VERY important that I forgot to 
mention.  Never let clay go down the sink.  Put plastic wash basins in 
the sinks for all tool and hand washing.  The tubs will overflow at some 
point, but the clay will have sunk to the bottom.  Pour this outside at 
the end of the day.
Heidi McElroy wrote:
>Don't forget dental floss for cutting clay. It works as well as those wire
>cutters you buy (that break all too soon).
>I put buckets of soapy water on students tables toward the end of class to
>prewash their hands so less clay goes to the trap.  If students are pressed
>for time, clay tools go in here also to soak and be rinsed later.
>  
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Favorite Clay "tool"
From: ARTNSOUL12@aol.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 18:17:44 EDT
X-Message-Number: 18
My kids favorite clay "tool" are plastic garlic  presses!  They put pieces
of 
clay inside (where the garlic would go), press  together, and out of the 
small holes comes very skinny strips of clay perfect  for birds' nests or
hair, 
for examples. Or let them use a garlic press in any  imaginative way they
can 
think of!  
Susan on Long Island  
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: problem with digest
From: Carokarn@aol.com
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 18:27:49 EDT
X-Message-Number: 19
   I had trouble also, but a chat with an aol tech cleared up the problem.  
When you open the window to type your message, right click and select
"compose 
in plain text".  Then type your message or reply.  
Good luck, 
Carol
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: problem with digest
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 20:44:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 20
It would help to know the EXACT message that is being received. It could be 
a number of things - sending in HTML format instead of plain text, server 
issues, incorrect e-mail addy, it's just hard to diagnose with only a 
generic error message.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> " Every time I send my inquiry to the address it is
> returned.  I am receiving the postings, but cannot
> transmit.  I chose to get the messages as a group.  I
> have a new job as an early childhood arts coordinator
> and would really like to begin a dialogue with others.
> What is your process for posting messages? 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Favorite Clay "tool"
From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 22:44:09 -0400
X-Message-Number: 21
I thought I would add another clay tool idea...
I buy packages of wooden chopsticks (very cheap!) and have the shop 
department sand down each end (on their big sander) so that one end is a 
point, and one is a wedge.  Extrememly useful for getting into those little 
places that fingers can't get to! 
---
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