Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 14, 2006

---------

From: carl toonz (carltoonz_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Jul 15 2006 - 04:50:05 PDT


re: artist:art educator
Hello all: Yes, this is a topic of particular interest to me too. I have
been a professional artist for over 30 years. I never thought about teaching
art until I got to grad school and I was offered a foundations class, that
included a small stipend and a tuition waiver. Well, I took it and I haven't
looked back since. I have been teaching art for the past 15 years at the
elementary level. Those kids are so full of energy, it is contagious.
Picasso spoke many times of wanting to be like a child again, when he made
his art. I have continued to create my own art at a fever pace while
teaching.
Earlier,this year I also started my own web site, to show my work. To see
for yourself, go to :
www.bobcarl-artist.com I also have my work on five other websites. Teaching
art, while it can be demanding, has truly enhanced my work. To be honest
with you all, I get more frustrated by the art educators that do not make
art. Those are the ones I don't understand, they can be such phonies. But,
perhaps I am getting too harsh here, I guess art educators that don't make
art need a kick in the pants to get going. That is all I'll say for now on
the subject, as I probably rustled plenty of chicken feathers by now.
Thanks, Bob
www.bobcarl-artist.com

>From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 14, 2006
>Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2006 00:00:04 -0700
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, July 14, 2006.
>
>1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>2. Off topic Sale on beautiful Jewelry at Novica.com
>3. Photo site
>4. Re: teachers as artists
>5. RE: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>6. Re: Artists as Teachers
>7. RE: Arches and Mesa Verde
>8. Being a New teacher
>9. Re:Artists as Teachers
>10. Re: Being a New teacher
>11. Re: Being a New teacher
>12. Re: Being a New teacher
>13. Re: Being a New teacher
>14. Re: Being a New teacher
>15. Re: Being a New teacher
>16. RE: Being a New teacher
>17. Re: Being a New teacher
>18. Re: Being a New teacher
>19. Re: Being a New teacher
>20. Re: Being a New teacher
>21. RE:teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>22. Re:Artists as Teachers
>23. Re:teachers as artists
>24. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>25. Re: No Family Left Behind Law
>26. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>From: "Greta Burman" <greta.burman@malmo.se>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 09:18:42 +0200
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>Hej
>Tack f?r ditt e-mail, jag har semester och ?r tillbaka 24/7
>
>Varma sommarh?lsningar
>Greta
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Off topic Sale on beautiful Jewelry at Novica.com
>From: "Christine Besack" <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 08:13:14 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
>Hi All, (sorry if this is off topic, but wanted to share this site)
>Just got this email about jewelry sale at Novica. (associated with National
>Geographic)
>Hand crafted , and beautiful items, right up our alley.
>If you also go to the couponit.com site they have online coupons you can
>use at Novica.
>Enjoy, Christine Besack :)
>
>
>Please enjoy our all-region Novica jewelry sale! Browse our
>most exquisite jewelry collection ever, featuring fine adornments
>handmade by master artisans and jewelers around the world:
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z56?c=21&l=3
>
>
>Jewelry Sale highlights:
>
>***Bracelets from Bali, India, Java, Thailand, Peru, Mexico,
>Brazil, and Ghana. So many flirty, stately, and sensuous original
>designs from which to choose!
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z57?c=21&l=3
>
>***Earrings in sterling silver, gold, gilded natural flower
>petals, gemstones... cheerful, elegant, delicate, weighty - a
>world of delightful wonders! Here is a special link to one
>category of our earrings department - our "Thai Treasures"
>earring showcase - just to give you a tempting taste! You will
>want to explore the "View Other Earring Categories" link, to view
>other designs from around the world:
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z58?c=672&l=5
>
>***Necklaces in a world of hues, styles, and prices - symbolic,
>artistic, traditional, modern, graceful, serious... all made
>lovingly by hand. Here is a link to just a small part of that
>collection, all on sale:
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z59?c=52&l=4&h=1
>
>***Rings, from sublime to bright and brilliant, handmade by
>master jewelers and master craftsmen and women in so many
>countries. When a style catches your eye, be sure to read the
>artist's biography. Many fascinating, wonderful, and inspiring
>individual artists participate in the making of Novica's jewelry
>collection:
>http://www.novica.com/1879927z143636z1630z60?c=21&l=3
>
>***Jewelry for Men - from work-wear to beach-wear, from rustic
>to racy, discover our favorite Men's bracelets, cufflinks,
>tie-clips, necklaces, pendants, and rings. Here is a link
>specifically to cufflinks, our most popular men's category:
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z61?c=710&l=5
>
>***Hairclips, brooches, anklets, and other unique jewelry
>categories. Have you ever dreamed of piling your hair up like a
>princess and fastening it with the most exquisite sterling silver
>work of art? Ever wished to decorate your business suit, ball
>gown, or jeans jacket with absolutely precious details made by
>your favorite goldsmith or silversmith? We are truly certain this
>is the finest collection the world over:
>http://www.novica.com/1879926z143635z1630z62?c=53&l=4
>
>***Jewelry boxes handmade by favorite artisans worldwide:
>lovely creations to hold your finest gems, jewelry, and
>keepsakes. Or to give as lifetime gifts... consider compiling
>little notes, fortune-cookie 'fortunes,' foreign coins, perhaps a
>few inspiring quotes, a love note, even a lock of beloved hair...
>then presenting your special collection of sentiments (in a
>stunning handmade box) to the person you love the most!
>http://www.novica.com/1879925z143634z1630z63?c=465&l=4
>
>***Pendants in striking designs from Mexico's Carlos Munoz,
>Peru's Giovanna Larnia, Brazil's Ana Berredo, Bali's Komang
>Budiarta, India's Harish Kathuria, and Thailand's Sukanya, to
>name just a few incredible creators:
>http://www.novica.com/1879920z143628z1630z65?c=445&l=4
>
>We greatly appreciate your support and encouragement of these
>tremendous artisans - and of Novica! Please do spread the word
>among friends and family, thank you!
>http://www.novica.com/info/howToHelpNovica.cfm
>
>Best regards,
>Catherine Gallegos
>Novica Editor
>http://www.novica.com/1879922z143631z1630z66?c=21&l=3
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>Novica
>11835 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 750E
>Los Angeles, California 90064 USA
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Photo site
>From: Ann Ayers <art304@bellsouth.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 08:55:50 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>http://www.photojojo.com/
>
>All levels of photographers will love Photojojo, which proudly claims
>to find the
>best digital photo-related websites around. Created by two passionate
>Brooklyn-based photographers, the site is a labor of love that will
>inspire
>you to do more with the thousands of images sitting in your computer's
>photo album.
>
>The newsletter is released twice a week, and contains the latest and
>coolest tricks for tweaking and improving your pics, DIY digital
>photography projects, new gear, and anything else related to cameras and
>the Web. Highlights include adding Bubble Snaps, instructions on how to
>turn your photos into toys, and how to make Photo Blocks.
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teachers as artists
>From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 06:03:05 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Well, once again, someone has touched a nerve among
>some of us regarding the artist/teacher debate. I
>have been a professional art educator for over 33
>years now, and during that time, have maintained a
>parallel career as a professional level artist. I
>have actively sold my work in galleries, had several
>one-person shows, and have made a fair amount of money
>from my work over the years. I have recently opened a
>commercial website to sell my work. I have found that
>being a fine artist is an essential part of my work as
>an educator. It keeps me in touch with the creative
>process, models the value of a practical application
>of art skills, and increases my stature among
>peers,students and the community. I have worked with
>many other art teachers who haven't practiced their
>original disciplines since they graduated from
>college, and, in my opinion, it has diminished their
>effectiveness as teachers. Why? Because they seem to
>have lost empathy and sympathy for the trails and
>tribulations of creating art, and the considerable
>practice and discipline involved in the creative
>process. Having an in-depth understanding of both the
>process and the product of visual art should be a
>major part of every art educator. I am an good art
>teacher because I am an artist,not in spite of it.
>
>Vigilance, Jerry
>
>Check out my website: www.artguyvilenski.com
>
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>From: "Maureen" <mmorris@theleonardo.org>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 10:03:01 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Susan's sentiment that if artists were that hot, they wouldn't teach is
>outdated. It goes back to the statement, "Those you can't, teach"
>Ironically, the best artists I know, do teach, and it is because they can.
>More and more high school principals in Salt Lake are only hiring art
>teachers that maintain their own work out/inside of the classroom and that
>exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching itself is an art form and,
>believe me, teachers are my heroes because they are capable of so much. How
>ever, this notion that artists have huge egos is so stereotypical. Art for
>the gallery is highly competitive. How many of you out there have purchased
>original artwork from the artists in your communities? It is not an easy
>path to walk. I personally chose to take something that I was very
>passionate about, study education alongside my activities as an artist and
>teach. A fundamental philosophical premise in democracy is this idea that
>citizens need to be educated. To do that, teachers need to implement
>strategies that preserve access for diverse students. I am right there with
>you. Of course, teachers in any subject, including art, need to be able to
>create classrooms that work for all if not most of the students. As far as
>artist-teachers painting or drawing on student work, that is a discourse
>that has gone back many hundred years. It just depends on what side of the
>fence you sit on. I had no problem with my art teachers demonstrating on my
>work. It was very useful to me because I knew that I would produce my own
>work. It is certainly a discussion that can happen with the class. Teachers
>do need to respect that some students might be put off by it. Many of the
>students at the high school level (art classes) are considering art careers
>seriously; they are putting portfolios together for scholarships and many
>of
>the skills learned in art classes will be applied in many fields. I
>personally feel, obviously, that teachers of art should be doing art
>themselves. Math classes prepare students to become engineers, scientists,
>etc. Art classes should be preparing students to enter fields that benefit
>from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable by the way.
>Maureen, artist, teacher and Art Ed. Coordinator
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
>[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
>Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 1:01 AM
>To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>
>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, July 13, 2006.
>
>1. Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q? teacherartexchange_?= digest: July
>12, 2006
>2. motivation
>3. Altered books for ceramics?
>4. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>5. Re: motivation
>6. RE: Altered books for ceramics?
>7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>8. Re: Altered books for ceramics?
>9. Stopping Hotlinking
>10. No Family Left Behind Law
>11. Re: No Family Left Behind Law
>12. Re: Stopping Hotlinking
>13. Re: motivation
>14. Re: Yet another twist...
>15. Teaching without preparation
>16. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>17. etsy.com in ready made magazine
>18. Re: Yet another twist...
>19. Re: Teaching without preparation
>20. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>21. Arches and Mesa Verde
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q? teacherartexchange_?=
>digest: July 12, 2006
>From: "Greta Burman" <greta.burman@malmo.se>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:16:49 +0200
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>Hej
>Tack f?r ditt e-mail, jag har semester och ?r tillbaka 24/7
>
>Varma sommarh?lsningar
>Greta
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: motivation
>From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 03:46:30 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>I teach HS and have always felt that I was as much
>manager as teacheres. I discovered a shelf of coaching
>and motivational books at my library around 658.312 on
>the spine (Dewey Decimal?) Anyway, there is a wealth
>of help, such as "coaching and mentoring for dummies",
>which has more background and "100 ways to motivate
>others" (Chandler), which of course has lots of
>examples.
>Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
>teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
>would be, focusing on what results you really want
>rather than just trying, routines.
>It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
>others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
>Hope this helps someone.
>Beth
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Altered books for ceramics?
>From: StacieMich@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:35:04 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>Hey guys,
>
>I'm starting to think of some projects for this upcoming year. I have
>always
>loved looking at the examples of altered books many of you have done with
>your students. Do you think that there would be a way to include a similar
>project in a ceramics class? I'm trying to think a little outside the
>box....for
>once they have the basics of handbuilding, pinch pots and coil pots...just
>wondering.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Stacie
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:34:56 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>Hi
>I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator. I have taught
>with those who are artists first and find them to have difficulties
>with mega egos. To be really honest if they were all that hot they
>would not be teaching. It is the same way with math, science etc.
>Those who are really gifted often do not have a clue as to how to
>teach others for understanding.I taught for a man that was a "good
>artist" . When a student did not understand he would just paint right
>on their work to "fix it" Those of us who remember our struggle in
>learning often end up having the art of teaching. Way to go Staci I
>think you will do a great job.
>Susan in Ohio
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
>Date: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 3:50 pm
>Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 10,
>2006
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Cc: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> > I think some of us are teachers then artists and some of us are
> > artists then teachers...we need both, but either way it's about
> > teaching. I've known many people who were great ceramicists or
> > painters or mathematicians or whatever who could not
> > "teach"...........
> > congrats Staci, the school has shown great faith in you and your
> > ability to inspire kids and they know that you will do what is
> > necessary to lead students technically, even if you're only a day
> > ahead of them :-)
> > can't wait to hear all your successes~
> > creatively, Linda in Oregon
> >
> >
> > Staci is also a fully qualified art teacher
> > Heather
> > On Jul 11, 2006, at 10:11 AM, M. Austin wrote:
> >
> > > This school hiring Staci as their new ceramics teacher does not
> > > necessarily mean that this school does not fully support the arts.
> > > ~Michal
> > >> I would have
> > >> much preferred the school hire a professional artist and
> > teacher.
> > >> I just think that when administrators hire
> > >> non-artists in general, we/they are doing a disservice to art
> > >> education and
> > >> not taking it seriously.
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: motivation
>From: KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:37:36 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>Helps me. I am glad for a few routines though. Also formal education
>on values and shading, perspective, proportion have been good concepts
>to teach and help build understanding. Nothing beats a self motivated
>person though!
>Susan in Ohio
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thursday, July 13, 2006 6:50 am
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] motivation
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>
> > I teach HS and have always felt that I was as much
> > manager as teacheres. I discovered a shelf of coaching
> > and motivational books at my library around 658.312 on
> > the spine (Dewey Decimal?) Anyway, there is a wealth
> > of help, such as "coaching and mentoring for dummies",
> > which has more background and "100 ways to motivate
> > others" (Chandler), which of course has lots of
> > examples.
> > Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
> > teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
> > would be, focusing on what results you really want
> > rather than just trying, routines.
> > It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> > others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
> > Hope this helps someone.
> > Beth
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: Altered books for ceramics?
>From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:54:28 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>Maybe not altered books + clay (other than creating something for a
>niche) - but what about bookmaking and clay - just searching and here is
>something that you could adapt for your class:
>http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/shows_cds/article/0,2045,DIY_15079_3092392
>,00.html
>
>also - I we don't have cable - so I don't get to watch many of the shows
>(just at the gym when I work out)... but on Carol Duval in August
>(8/11/06 @ 1:00 EST) there will be an episode on altered books. Might
>be something to tape for a class -=20
>Ellen
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 07:10:33 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>uh, susan, i'm sure you didn't mean it in a way that
>would raise my hackles, but i strongly disagree with:
>" To be really honest if they were all that hot they
>would not be teaching." i understand that a "good"
>artist doesn't always make a good teacher, but here in
>our online community you can find an abundance of
>phenomenal artists who are fabulous teachers (even
>after they retire!). their work in art education and
>as artists is a huge source of inspiration to me as
>well as their students, i'm sure. be careful of
>sweeping generalities!
>
>:D wendy
>
> wendy
>www.wendypaigefree.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Altered books for ceramics?
>From: StacieMich@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:15:42 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>In a message dated 7/13/2006 10:06:20 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ELLEN.SEARS
>writes:
>just searching and here is
>something that you could adapt for your class:
>http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/shows_cds/article/0,2045,DIY_15079_3092392
>,00.html
>Yeah, I don't have the channel either, but thanks for the great web site!
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Stopping Hotlinking
>From: Eleanor Ramsay <eleanor@elramsay.com>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:43:04 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>Back from vacation and catching up with lots of digests.
>
>A few days ago there was a discussion about how to prevent the
>hotlinking of your images.. It is actually not that difficult to
>achieve if you have FTP access to your website.
>
>You want to create an .htaccess file. Open a blank page using notepad
>(PC) or textedit (Mac). Don't use a word-processing or web editor for
>this.
>
>Paste the following in:
>
>RewriteEngine on
>RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
>RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER}
>!^http://([-a-z0-9]+\.)?yourdomainname\.com [NC]
>RewriteRule \.(gif|jpe?g|png)$ - [F,NC,L]
>
>Change the domain name on line three to your YOUR domain. Leave that
>slash in there, it's very important. This line allows you to link to
>your own images.
>
>Now, save the page as .htaccess (If you are using a Mac, you should
>leave the dot off the beginning and add it when you upload the page.
>Rename it on the web server, otherwise you won't be able to see the
>page once you've saved it because the Mac makes any page beginning with
>a period invisible).
>
>Upload this page in the root (main folder) of your website. If your
>site already has an .htaccess file, you can add this information to it.
>
>What this will do is simply prevent all your images from being
>hotlinked. You could also add a line to redirect to a different image
>but, since bandwidth theft is what you are trying to prevent, that's
>never made too much sense to me. There are a lot of good tutorials
>explaining this method online. Google: prevent hotlinking .htaccess
>
>OK, back to art-making. :-)
>
>-Eleanor Ramsay
>http://www.aecontent.net/aec
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: No Family Left Behind Law
>From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:40:44 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
>Hi,
>
>This is from Michael Winerip's NYT's column of July 12, 2006
>
>"We need a No Family Left Behind Law. This would measure economic
>growth of families and punish politicians in charge of states with
>poor economic growth for minority families.
>
>FOR example, in Ohio, black families earn only 62 percent of white
>household income, one of the biggest disparities nationally. So every
>year, under No Family Left Behind, Ohio would be expected to close
>that income gap. If it failed to make adequate yearly progress for
>black families' wealth, the governor and legislators would be judged
>failing, and after five years, could be removed from office. This way
>public schools wouldn't be the only institutions singled out for
>failing poor children.
>
>And if states succeeded in closing the economic gap, test scores would
>be expected to rise, giving politicians and teachers a chance to
>celebrate together."
>
>
>--
>Harold
>
>Harold Olejarz
>Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
>Website - www.digitalharold.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: No Family Left Behind Law
>From: "Joe & Vickie Magee" <jvmagee@centurytel.net>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:12:00 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>Amen!
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2006 9:40 AM
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] No Family Left Behind Law
>
>
> > Hi,
> >
> > This is from Michael Winerip's NYT's column of July 12, 2006
> >
> > "We need a No Family Left Behind Law. This would measure economic
> > growth of families and punish politicians in charge of states with
> > poor economic growth for minority families.
> >
> > FOR example, in Ohio, black families earn only 62 percent of white
> > household income, one of the biggest disparities nationally. So every
> > year, under No Family Left Behind, Ohio would be expected to close
> > that income gap. If it failed to make adequate yearly progress for
> > black families' wealth, the governor and legislators would be judged
> > failing, and after five years, could be removed from office. This way
> > public schools wouldn't be the only institutions singled out for
> > failing poor children.
> >
> > And if states succeeded in closing the economic gap, test scores would
> > be expected to rise, giving politicians and teachers a chance to
> > celebrate together."
> >
> >
> > --
> > Harold
> >
> > Harold Olejarz
> > Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
> > Website - www.digitalharold.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Stopping Hotlinking
>From: sharon@art-rageous.net
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 11:01:24 -0500 (EST)
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>Thanks for the information! I'd seen something about this on my webhost's
>info page but it sounded complicated. Your explanation makes sense. :-)
>
>
> > Back from vacation and catching up with lots of digests.
> >
> > A few days ago there was a discussion about how to prevent the
> > hotlinking of your images.. It is actually not that difficult to
> > achieve if you have FTP access to your website.
> >
> > You want to create an .htaccess file. Open a blank page using notepad
> > (PC) or textedit (Mac). Don't use a word-processing or web editor for
> > this.
> >
> > Paste the following in:
> >
> > RewriteEngine on
> > RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
> > RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER}
> > !^http://([-a-z0-9]+\.)?yourdomainname\.com [NC]
> > RewriteRule \.(gif|jpe?g|png)$ - [F,NC,L]
> >
> > Change the domain name on line three to your YOUR domain. Leave that
> > slash in there, it's very important. This line allows you to link to
> > your own images.
> >
> > Now, save the page as .htaccess (If you are using a Mac, you should
> > leave the dot off the beginning and add it when you upload the page.
> > Rename it on the web server, otherwise you won't be able to see the
> > page once you've saved it because the Mac makes any page beginning with
> > a period invisible).
> >
> > Upload this page in the root (main folder) of your website. If your
> > site already has an .htaccess file, you can add this information to it.
> >
> > What this will do is simply prevent all your images from being
> > hotlinked. You could also add a line to redirect to a different image
> > but, since bandwidth theft is what you are trying to prevent, that's
> > never made too much sense to me. There are a lot of good tutorials
> > explaining this method online. Google: prevent hotlinking .htaccess
> >
> > OK, back to art-making. :-)
> >
> > -Eleanor Ramsay
> > http://www.aecontent.net/aec
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>Sharon
>www.art-rageous.net
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: motivation
>From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 12:54:30 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>
>On Jul 13, 2006, at 6:46 AM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
>
> >
> > Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
> > teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
> > would be, focusing on what results you really want
> > rather than just trying, routines.
> > It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> > others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
>
>I would add and expand:
>"Teaching how to teach yourself" ... and teach others. The whole
>idea behind all the differentiation methods currently being promoted
>is that kids learn best when the learning is self directed. We
>teach them how to solve problems and how to use the problem solving
>in all areas. Peer teaching is a great motivator. We know the old
>saying "you learn best when you have to teach it." Find places
>where the kids can research solutions and then teach each other. Act
>as facilitator, only interfere when correction is needed.
>
>"Focusing on what results you really want." This is the crux of
>the "Understanding by Design " curriculum writing. Start with the
>big question then figure the steps to the culminating outcome. And
>don't leave the kids out of the process. They need clear
>expectations. The question for me, is it what "I want" or what will
>give them skills they can transfer to what they want and finding some
>place where we both have wants satisfied. I still, too often, see
>teachers with certain expectations that have not made evaluation
>clear. I still too often hear kids in art wondering why they got a B
>or a C on a project when they thought they were doing the right
>thing. If a student doesn't do as well on a project as she/he
>thought, how do you motivate to the next project?
>
>Sometimes you must give up the routines. I get bored with my
>routines.
>Understanding student learning styles and interests, I think is
>critical in motivating. Allowing students to make choices in
>their explorations is highly motivating. Teaching them to make the
>best choices is our job. The conventions of art making are practice.
>The kids will do the practice if we give them the choices as to where
>to apply the practice.
>
> > It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> > others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
>I think we can manage. Teacher training courses are filled with
>management techniques. Encouraging self motivation is another
>skill. I think motivation always starts with the best presentation
>from the motivator that there is a reason to be motivated. Value the
>parts of the process that the student connects with, build on that,
>and wonder if the product is the best part of the process to
>evaluate. Keep asking big questions.
>
>Patty
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Yet another twist...
>From: The Trains <strain@oise.utoronto.ca>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 13:33:06 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 14
>
>This is summer and many camps offer ceramics. Maybe you could
>"volunteer" and get some practical experience.
>
>Shayne
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Teaching without preparation
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 13:35:46 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 15
>
>Should art teachers take assignments for which they are not well prepared?
>
>I believe that once a person has good basic preparation in at least one art
>specialty, has good art teaching preparation, is passionate about art, and
>is passionate about teaching art; the person can learn to teach any art
>specialty if they have desire, an average intelligence, and at least
>average
>creativity.
>
>I have taken on many art teaching assignments for which I was not prepared.
>In each case I found that it worked well, but I did a lot of work and
>self-preparation. These are some of the things to PREPARE MYSELF and help
>my students LEARN FROM many rich SOURCES OTHER THAN ME.
>
>SELF-PREPARATION:
>1. I sought out teachers who were experienced specialists in the specialty
>that I was planning to teach. I asked them for all the help they were
>willing to give. Some gave me their whole syllabus and all their
>assignments and so on. Most teachers are very generous in this regard. By
>just calling on the phone I got things such as how much work to expect from
>students and the range of student expertise I could expect. I could also
>ask them about the main problems they faced and the main things they tried
>to include with regard to the final exam and final skill level goals.
>
>2. Sometimes I took evening or summer classes in the specialty in a nearby
>university art dept.
>
>3. I bought books, journals, and checked out lots of library books and
>magazines.
>
>4. I bought art materials and equipment to try things. Sometimes I set up
>a studio at home where I could experiment and practice in private.
>
>5. In some cases I hired advanced students to give me private tutoring in
>the technical aspects of the subject. A high school teacher may want to
>find a college student who has mastered a special skill. The college
>student will work cheap and be able to use this experience in her own
>resume. College instructors are willing to name students who are best
>qualified to do this.
>
>SOURCES OTHER THAN ME for my students to learn:
>1. I sought out video programs that covered all the special technical
>skills that I lacked. I have learned an amazing amount of art skills and
>very interesting gimmicks and trivia from educational videos that I rented
>or purchased for my students to watch.
>
>2. I made sure the students had a good textbook covering the special area
>so that they always had more than just me to find technical help.
>
>3. I had a collection of library books available and I assigned students
>to
>always have at least one library book checked out related to the subject we
>were learning. I brought in piles of back issues of the magazines related
>to the area I was teaching. I brought in my own books.
>
>4. I assigned student reports. Each student had to research one artist
>within the specialty or one technique in the specialty and present an
>illustrated class report with an emphasis on the thinking and feeling
>behind
>the work. Why did artists do what they did? What motivated them?
>
>5. I gave assignments for them to find and prepare handouts with a list of
>annotated Internet resources where other students students could find
>answers to technical questions.
>
>6. I hired one or more advanced students to come in and assist beginning
>students overcome difficulties during practice sessions. This was
>generally
>very good for both the learners and the teachers, but advanced students
>need
>to be told never to do the work for the beginner, and never to give
>artistic
>suggestions--only technical oversight. Beginners must make their own
>artistic and design choices. Tutors are allowed to ask open questions when
>coaching for artistic ideas and choices.
>
>7. I brought local professionals into the classroom to make presentations
>about their lives and work. Students were required to prepare questions
>that they could ask the professional.
>
>8. We took field trips to the studios of professionals. Students were
>required to prepare questions that they would ask the professional.
>
>9. When students asked me questions that I could not expertly answer, I
>did
>not answer them. I tried to ask them how we could experiment to find the
>answer to the question or where we might go to look for the answer. In
>general, I do not think I should make many suggestions or answer many
>student questions even when I am an expert. Even when I know an answer I
>often to not give it because I think it is better for students to learn to
>experiment. Mistakes are okay because they can be examined for creative
>ideas and they are a very memorable form of learning.
>
>STUDENT FEEDBACK
>I learned that it was a good idea to ask the students for feedback. I ask
>what they want to learn and what they think would make the class a better
>learning experience for them. Doing this early during the course and at
>mid-term tends to result in better student satisfaction at the end of the
>term. I never push it too hard and I never depend on the students to
>design
>the course because they are seldom able to do it very well, but they do
>appreciate it if I ask for their opinions, and if I make a few improvements
>based on their ideas (if I can with integrity). It also reminds them to
>take some responsibility for the quality of their own education.
>
>Marvin Bartel
>
>Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"You can't ever know how you actually do it before you teach it to somebody
>else." ... said by many old art teachers
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:38:27 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 16
>
>KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com wrote:
>
> >Hi
> >I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator. I have taught
> >with those who are artists first and find them to have difficulties
> >with mega egos. To be really honest if they were all that hot they
> >would not be teaching.
> >
>Well, with that "honest" assessment you managed to not only reinforce
>the adage that "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach," but you
>dissed the many professional teachers who do practice their craft,
>exhibit, and sell. What is "hot," anyway? An active exhibition
>schedule? Selling regularly? Simply producing fine works of art for
>the sheer joy of it? Many professional artists have a deep love of
>teaching and sharing their knowledge, not because they're not-so-hot.
>
>Maggie
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: etsy.com in ready made magazine
>From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 14:42:19 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 17
>
>An article in the current issue of Ready-Made about Etsy.com
>A place to buy all things handmade... launched last June. I think you
>can also commission -=20
>Fun place if you haven't already been there -=20
>Ellen
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Yet another twist...
>From: StacieMich@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:36:17 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 18
>
>In a message dated 7/13/2006 1:40:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time, writes:
>This is summer and many camps offer ceramics. Maybe you could
>"volunteer" and get some practical experience.
>This is actually what I've started doing! I've gone twice and am going
>back
>
>tomorrow. They have two more weeks of camp, so I'm going to try to go as
>often as I can. They've already been so helpful!
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Teaching without preparation
>From: StacieMich@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:40:44 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 19
>
>In a message dated 7/13/2006 2:04:41 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Marvin
>writes:
>These are some of the things to PREPARE MYSELF and help my students LEARN
>FROM many rich SOURCES OTHER THAN ME.
>Thanks, these are great tips! I've already done some legwork...I've
>started
>
>volunteering at a ceramics camp, I've taken my first private wheel lesson,
>and
>I'm siging up for a ceramics class at my university in August. I've bought
>some books and plan on going to the library. I'm trying to make it my job
>to
>learn a little bit about ceramics every day. Between that and painting for
>my
>upcoming graduate course, I'm keeping very busy. It's going to be good for
>me
>though, I know it. Thanks again!!!
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:30:37 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 20
>
>Thank You Maggie,
> For the many of us who create because we love it and also
>teach because we love that too. Perhaps we can instill in our young
>students our passion for art. There is more to making art than
>making a living doing it. More power to those few who have been
>able to earn a few bucks at it as well. It is a very competitive
>market out there. I'm trying to grow with my watercolors since I
>retired from teaching. I suspect I'll be forever trying to grow.
> Woody
>
>On Jul 13, 2006, at 11:38 AM, Maggie White wrote:
>
> > KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com wrote:
> >
> >> Hi
> >> I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator. I have =20
> >> taught with those who are artists first and
> >> find them to have difficulties with mega egos. To be really honest =20=
>
> >> if they were all that hot they
> >> would not be teaching.
> > Well, with that "honest" assessment you managed to not only =20
> > reinforce the adage that "Those who
> > can, do; those who can't, teach," but you dissed the many =20
> > professional teachers who do practice their craft,
> > exhibit, and sell. What is "hot," anyway? An active exhibition =20
> > schedule? Selling regularly? Simply
> > producing fine works of art for the sheer joy of it? Many =20
> > professional artists have a deep love of teaching
> > and sharing their knowledge, not because they're not-so-hot.
> >
> > Maggie
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Arches and Mesa Verde
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 21:48:40 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 21
>
>The Southwest is an artist's paradise. I'm trying to introduce it's =20
>landscape
>to the triplets a little bit at a time. Here are a few pics from our =20
>recent visit
>to Arches (in Utah) and Mesa Verde (in Colorado).
>http://www.taospaint.com/MesaVerde/andArches.html
>I'm actually in a couple of the photos. I'm usually behind the lens.
> Woody
>
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>mmorris@theleonardo.org
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Artists as Teachers
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 11:24:05 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>First of all, "please" don't resend the entire digest when you wish
>to comment on a single topic.
>
>On Jul 14, 2006, at 10:03 AM, Maureen wrote:
>
> > More and more high school principals in Salt Lake are only hiring art
> > teachers that maintain their own work out/inside of the classroom =20
> > and that
> > exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching itself is an art form =20
> > and,
> > believe me, teachers are my heroes because they are capable of so =20
> > much.
>
>I'm an advocate of art teachers being artist , but I would not wish to
>preclude those who do not work at and exhibit their art from teaching
>art, especially at the elementary level. I've know many good art
>teachers who did not pursue their own art.
>
> > Of course, teachers in any subject, including art, need to be able to
> > create classrooms that work for all if not most of the students.
>
>NCLB requires us to reach "all" students.
>
> > As far as
> > artist-teachers painting or drawing on student work, that is a =20
> > discourse
> > that has gone back many hundred years.
>
>I had a great watercolor workshop instructor who did his critiques by
>painting on students work. I politely explained that as an old art
>teacher I preferred that he not touch my paintings. He respected
>my request.
>
> > Art classes should be preparing students to enter fields that benefit
> > from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable by the way.
>
>Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We need =20
>to teach
>all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the =20
>serious ones
>but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
>
> Woody
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: Arches and Mesa Verde
>From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 14:31:40 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>They did better than I did - I kept asking for a back way out at Mesa
>Verde to keep off of the 'breathtaking' roads - and we stayed in the
>lodge. I thought they were going to have to medicate me to get me down.
>Obviously not fond of heights. Still not sure what my husband was
>thinking. I didn't join then at the Arches - but read a book at a
>little inn while my husband and sons took off. That is where I lost my
>wallet. Ahhh - vacation memories.
>Ellen
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Woody Duncan [mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net]=20
>
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Arches and Mesa Verde
>
>The Southwest is an artist's paradise. I'm trying to introduce it's =20
>landscape
>to the triplets a little bit at a time. Here are a few pics from our =20
>recent visit
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Being a New teacher
>From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 15:28:05 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>The one thing I hear from new teachers is "I really wasn't prepared
>for....." I won't begin to list the "was-nots"
>Mostly it is routine stuff, that many of us take for granted.
>Many school systems have mentors for new teachers , but from what I
>read, I suspect many new teachers are set out to fend for themselves.
>
>I wonder what is not happening in our pre-service programs. ? I
>know that there are a few on this list that direct student teacher
>programs and do excellent jobs with being on top of the latest and
>best information. My experience with student teachers is that they
>have no idea how to handle all the day to day on top of creating
>lessons. And it is my opinion that the first year of teaching is so
>overwhelming as to procedures and management that being creative with
>lessons becomes something there is little time for. Scattered,
>unprepared thinking in lessons only creates management problems.
>Trust and rely on stuff you are sure of, even if the lesson is not so
>new.
>
>But, constantly there are stories on this list about people coming
>from places that may not be so new. I'm thinking about Staci who is
>knocking herself out trying to learn a skill that she is unfamiliar
>with. She is getting tons of support from this list, but what is the
>"in-school" support? When she spends her summer learning the skill
>and then gets into an unfamiliar place with an unfamiliar curriculum
>(If I recall Staci said this a magnet school with an IB curriculum)
>with an age group she isn't accustomed to, who will be there to help
>her with the day to day which is often the down fall of new
>teachers? Being prepared is much more than conveying the skills.
>Being prepared is understanding the needs and interests of the
>students and conveying that into meaningful lessons with purpose and
>intent.
>
>I started teaching after many years in an art career. I thought I
>knew about art. I wasn't sure about teaching art. My 14 years have
>been filled with constant preparation, I barely slept my first 2
>years and I barely sleep now. It's not the "stuff" that keeps me
>awake now, it's the methods of conveying the stuff. Every year the
>kids are different, every year they are more or less of something,
>but every year there is that bunch of faces hoping I will give some
>reason for why they are sitting there.
>
>My best advice for new teachers, is don't pretend anything ---- be
>honest when you don't know and make it into an experience. First
>and most you need to establish a class environment that makes every
>kid feel safe and free to explore and make mistakes and investigate
>at their own pace and expectations ( and that includes your own
>safety). Make every day a new day. The luxury of teaching art is
>that the pace and expectations can be choice based.
>
>It really concerns me that there are still conversations about the
>"artist as teacher" and those that still say "those that can't -
>teach... "
>That attitude totally demoralizes the motivation of those of us that
>want to teach and disregards the reasons we teach. My skills as a
>teacher come very much from from how I learned to be an artist. And,
>one does learn how to be an artist. Gifts,skills and talent are not
>enough. What I think artists that teach bring to the classroom is
>the "process" -- how do we get to ideas and communicate the
>idea. I'm lucky that all my artist/teachers knew how to ask the
>questions to make me think. I can cajole and manipulate thinking
>about technique, but the best thing I do as a teacher is ask WHY?
>
> I still can't throw a pot and I don't care to. But I love hand
>building and don't disregard what I can do with a slab. Does that
>make me less of a ceramic artist? I was always penalized because
>I don't care about pulling a shape on the wheel. I don't want to
>make a mug or a vase. But I can take ugly stuff and combine it with
>other techniques and make something out of it.
>
>So what processes do we value? And how do we let kids know that we
>value the exploration even when the product may not be an "A?"
>I'll end with what Woody says:
> > Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We
> > need to teach
> > all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the
> > serious ones
> > but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
>A broad brush indeed. ... that gives kids lots of opportunity to
>make, and to appreciate, and plenty of opportunity to question.
>
>Patty
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re:Artists as Teachers
>From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 13:35:13 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>Hi all,
>
>Can't help but jump into this one. I believe that art teachers are art
>educators. An art educator is someone who represents the entire discipline
>of
>art, not just art studio. In fact, art education is itself its own
>discipline.
>I believe that art educators are not just artists who teach. Rather they
>are
>educators who have a passion for the subject matter of art and are
>professionals who can help their students learn about all aspects of art.
>An
>art educator is greater than the collective sum of all the parts of the
>discipline of art. They are a unique professional.
>
>So let us all rise above the artist teacher debate and assume a greater
>paradigm
>for who we are.
>
>Cheers,
>
>Diane
>--
>Dr. Diane C. Gregory
>Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
>Studies in Art Education
>Texas Woman's University
>Denton, TX 76204
>dgregory@mail.twu.edu
>940-898-2540
>
>
>Quoting Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>:
>
> > First of all, "please" don't resend the entire digest when you wish
> > to comment on a single topic.
> >
> > On Jul 14, 2006, at 10:03 AM, Maureen wrote:
> >
> > > More and more high school principals in Salt Lake are only hiring art
> > > teachers that maintain their own work out/inside of the classroom
> > > and that
> > > exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching itself is an art form
> > > and,
> > > believe me, teachers are my heroes because they are capable of so
> > > much.
> >
> > I'm an advocate of art teachers being artist , but I would not wish to
> > preclude those who do not work at and exhibit their art from teaching
> > art, especially at the elementary level. I've know many good art
> > teachers who did not pursue their own art.
> >
> > > Of course, teachers in any subject, including art, need to be able to
> > > create classrooms that work for all if not most of the students.
> >
> > NCLB requires us to reach "all" students.
> >
> > > As far as
> > > artist-teachers painting or drawing on student work, that is a
> > > discourse
> > > that has gone back many hundred years.
> >
> > I had a great watercolor workshop instructor who did his critiques by
> > painting on students work. I politely explained that as an old art
> > teacher I preferred that he not touch my paintings. He respected
> > my request.
> >
> > > Art classes should be preparing students to enter fields that benefit
> > > from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable by the way.
> >
> > Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We need
> > to teach
> > all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the
> > serious ones
> > but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
> >
> > Woody
> >
> > Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> > mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
> >
> > 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> > in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> > http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> > Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> > Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
> >
> > ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> > is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> > of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
> >
> > Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> > Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
> > My newest watercolors:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 13:50:14 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
>I have been teaching preservice art teachers for over 25 years. I still
>have
>not figured out how to do it effectively. There is a systemic problem in
>teacher education and universities. It seems that most universities are
>not
>about learning. It is about buildings, programs, enrollment, jobs,
>careers,
>administration policies...rarely is it about learning...So I find it very
>challenging to try to help art teachers get a good start. An entire
>overhall
>is needed. I would like to see more partnerships with schools. I would
>like
>to work with K-12 schools to stay involved in teaching K-12. I would like
>to
>see my students working in the schools every day. I would like to see my
>students focus on helping K-12 art students how to learn about art. Right
>now,
>the whole university thing seems to be a right of passage...and then you
>can get
>out and learn how to teach. Maybe art teachers get a clue about doing this
>effectively after about 10 years or so. As a teacher educator the state
>of
>affairs is disheartening. Nevertheless, I am not giving up...God knows I
>love
>this field. I hope I have helped someone become a better person and a
>better
>art teacher. With each new semester, hope springs eternal.
>
>This is my .02 cents.
>--
>Dr. Diane C. Gregory
>Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
>Studies in Art Education
>Texas Woman's University
>Denton, TX 76204
>dgregory@mail.twu.edu
>940-898-2540
>
>
>Quoting Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>:
>
> > The one thing I hear from new teachers is "I really wasn't prepared
> > for....." I won't begin to list the "was-nots"
> > Mostly it is routine stuff, that many of us take for granted.
> > Many school systems have mentors for new teachers , but from what I
> > read, I suspect many new teachers are set out to fend for themselves.
> >
> > I wonder what is not happening in our pre-service programs. ? I
> > know that there are a few on this list that direct student teacher
> > programs and do excellent jobs with being on top of the latest and
> > best information. My experience with student teachers is that they
> > have no idea how to handle all the day to day on top of creating
> > lessons. And it is my opinion that the first year of teaching is so
> > overwhelming as to procedures and management that being creative with
> > lessons becomes something there is little time for. Scattered,
> > unprepared thinking in lessons only creates management problems.
> > Trust and rely on stuff you are sure of, even if the lesson is not so
> > new.
> >
> > But, constantly there are stories on this list about people coming
> > from places that may not be so new. I'm thinking about Staci who is
> > knocking herself out trying to learn a skill that she is unfamiliar
> > with. She is getting tons of support from this list, but what is the
> > "in-school" support? When she spends her summer learning the skill
> > and then gets into an unfamiliar place with an unfamiliar curriculum
> > (If I recall Staci said this a magnet school with an IB curriculum)
> > with an age group she isn't accustomed to, who will be there to help
> > her with the day to day which is often the down fall of new
> > teachers? Being prepared is much more than conveying the skills.
> > Being prepared is understanding the needs and interests of the
> > students and conveying that into meaningful lessons with purpose and
> > intent.
> >
> > I started teaching after many years in an art career. I thought I
> > knew about art. I wasn't sure about teaching art. My 14 years have
> > been filled with constant preparation, I barely slept my first 2
> > years and I barely sleep now. It's not the "stuff" that keeps me
> > awake now, it's the methods of conveying the stuff. Every year the
> > kids are different, every year they are more or less of something,
> > but every year there is that bunch of faces hoping I will give some
> > reason for why they are sitting there.
> >
> > My best advice for new teachers, is don't pretend anything ---- be
> > honest when you don't know and make it into an experience. First
> > and most you need to establish a class environment that makes every
> > kid feel safe and free to explore and make mistakes and investigate
> > at their own pace and expectations ( and that includes your own
> > safety). Make every day a new day. The luxury of teaching art is
> > that the pace and expectations can be choice based.
> >
> > It really concerns me that there are still conversations about the
> > "artist as teacher" and those that still say "those that can't -
> > teach... "
> > That attitude totally demoralizes the motivation of those of us that
> > want to teach and disregards the reasons we teach. My skills as a
> > teacher come very much from from how I learned to be an artist. And,
> > one does learn how to be an artist. Gifts,skills and talent are not
> > enough. What I think artists that teach bring to the classroom is
> > the "process" -- how do we get to ideas and communicate the
> > idea. I'm lucky that all my artist/teachers knew how to ask the
> > questions to make me think. I can cajole and manipulate thinking
> > about technique, but the best thing I do as a teacher is ask WHY?
> >
> > I still can't throw a pot and I don't care to. But I love hand
> > building and don't disregard what I can do with a slab. Does that
> > make me less of a ceramic artist? I was always penalized because
> > I don't care about pulling a shape on the wheel. I don't want to
> > make a mug or a vase. But I can take ugly stuff and combine it with
> > other techniques and make something out of it.
> >
> > So what processes do we value? And how do we let kids know that we
> > value the exploration even when the product may not be an "A?"
> > I'll end with what Woody says:
> > > Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We
> > > need to teach
> > > all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the
> > > serious ones
> > > but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
> > A broad brush indeed. ... that gives kids lots of opportunity to
> > make, and to appreciate, and plenty of opportunity to question.
> >
> > Patty
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 14:59:43 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>Great paragraph from both Patty & Woody. I have taught many students to
>enjoy the process of creating, but few have gone on to art careers. Some of
>my most talented students choose different paths, despite my encouragement.
>I don't regret my time with these students, but my "success" stories are
>those that often involve students who simply enjoy the process regardless
>of
>the results. You know the kids - they seem completely disinterested, yet
>they show up one day showing off their new sketchbook and drawing pencils
>that they "asked for and got for their birthday". That's when you know you
>are succeeding as a teacher - and the reason not everyone can teach. You
>have to be able to connect with ALL your students on some level.
>
>On another note, I have often felt guilty when I would read remarks that
>art
>teachers should be creating art of their own. My entire teaching career has
>not only been filled with my K-12 art curriculum, but also that of being a
>wife and mother. With two children who were athletes and active in school I
>decided day one of teaching that MY children came first. I spent my school
>days giving 100% to my students, and my evenings giving 100% to my family.
>There was little time for art of my own. Now that my children are grown I
>have decided that I would NOT do one thing different. It is easy when you
>are older and don't have all those demands on your time to create art, but
>we should never guilt our fellow art teachers who are not creating on the
>side for reasons of their own choosing.
>~Michal
>K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
>http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
> > So what processes do we value? And how do we let kids know that we
>value
> > the exploration even when the product may not be an "A?"
> > I'll end with what Woody says:
> >> Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We need
>to
> >> teach
> >> all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the
>serious
> >> ones
> >> but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
> > A broad brush indeed. ... that gives kids lots of opportunity to make,
> > and to appreciate, and plenty of opportunity to question.
> >
> > Patty
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 15:16:30 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>One big problem I see with the college prep experience is how pre-service
>teachers miss out on some of the most important days of the school year -
>the beginning! In my area most colleges don't start for 3-4 weeks after the
>public and private schools do. Then the pre-service teachers often don't
>begin student teaching for 1-2 weeks after that. These pre-service teachers
>have missed seeing how the classroom teacher has set classroom management
>procedures, why certain rules are instilled because of specific classroom
>needs, the staff meetings where staff expectations are shared.
>
>In my experience, the colleges seem to be out-of-touch with what schools
>are
>expecting. My own college experience was spent with countless hours
>creating
>a teaching portfolio that we were assured was what employers would expect
>to
>see when we interviewed. My entire graduating class of art educators later
>discussed the fact that not once, in any of our experiences, did
>interviewing administrators want to see those portfolios. Things may have
>changed, but we all felt that our college was not truely in touch with what
>was going on in education outside their walls.
>~Michal
>K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
>http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
> >> The one thing I hear from new teachers is "I really wasn't prepared
> >> for....." I won't begin to list the "was-nots"
> >> Mostly it is routine stuff, that many of us take for granted.
> >> Many school systems have mentors for new teachers , but from what I
> >> read, I suspect many new teachers are set out to fend for themselves.
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 14:41:30 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>
>On Jul 14, 2006, at 1:59 PM, M. Austin wrote:
>
> > I decided day one of teaching that MY children came first. I spent =20=
>
> > my school days giving 100% to my students,
> > and my evenings giving 100% to my family. There was little time for =20=
>
> > art of my own. Now that my children are grown
> > I have decided that I would NOT do one thing different. It is easy =20
> > when you are older and don't have all those demands
> > on your time to create art, but we should never guilt our fellow =20
> > art teachers who are not creating on the side
> > for reasons of their own choosing.
>
>Over the years I've had several very good principals. But the best =20
>were the one's
>who stressed what was most important, your family. I have not often =20
>enough heeded
>this good advice but it is important to keep your priorities =20
>straight. Don't let your
>outside activities (employment, sports, politics, art, etc.) be a =20
>reason to neglect what
>is most important, your spouse and your kids. And your wife or =20
>husband should come
>first. Remember, at some point the kids will leave, while marriage =20
>should be forever.
>Luckily, for me, Frani has stuck with me even though I've often been =20
>too busy to really
>pay her enough attention.
> =
>Woody
>Yes, there is a Frani. She is not a myth.
>
> >
> >
> >> So what processes do we value? And how do we let kids know that =20
> >> we value the exploration even when the product may not be an "A?"
> >> I'll end with what Woody says:
> >>> Most of our students will never go into art as a profession. We =20
> >>> need to teach
> >>> all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't neglect the =20=
>
> >>> serious ones
> >>> but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
> >> A broad brush indeed. ... that gives kids lots of opportunity to =20
> >> make, and to appreciate, and plenty of opportunity to question.
> >>
> >> Patty
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to http://www.getty.edu/education/=20
> > teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 14:49:10 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 14
>
>Yes, there should be a roundtable discussion to change the ways art =20
>teachers are prepared.
>I suggest that several major universities get together to sponsor =20
>this sort of forum. They could
>invite seasoned art teachers to explore better ways to prepare our =20
>future teachers. If anyone
>is listening, this is a serious proposal. Think about it.
> Woody
>
>On Jul 14, 2006, at 2:16 PM, M. Austin wrote:
>
> > One big problem I see with the college prep experience is how pre-=20
> > service teachers miss out on some of the most important days of the =20=
>
> > school year - the beginning! In my area most colleges don't start =20
> > for 3-4 weeks after the public and private schools do. Then the pre-=20=
>
> > service teachers often don't begin student teaching for 1-2 weeks =20
> > after that. These pre-service teachers have missed seeing how the =20
> > classroom teacher has set classroom management procedures, why =20
> > certain rules are instilled because of specific classroom needs, =20
> > the staff meetings where staff expectations are shared.
> >
> > In my experience, the colleges seem to be out-of-touch with what =20
> > schools are expecting. My own college experience was spent with =20
> > countless hours creating a teaching portfolio that we were assured =20
> > was what employers would expect to see when we interviewed. My =20
> > entire graduating class of art educators later discussed the fact =20
> > that not once, in any of our experiences, did interviewing =20
> > administrators want to see those portfolios. Things may have =20
> > changed, but we all felt that our college was not truely in touch =20
> > with what was going on in education outside their walls.
> > ~Michal
> > K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> > http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> >
> >
> >>> The one thing I hear from new teachers is "I really wasn't prepared
> >>> for....." I won't begin to list the "was-nots"
> >>> Mostly it is routine stuff, that many of us take for granted.
> >>> Many school systems have mentors for new teachers , but from what I
> >>> read, I suspect many new teachers are set out to fend for =20
> >>> themselves.
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to http://www.getty.edu/education/=20
> > teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 13:56:53 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 15
>
>Woody Duncan wrote:
>
> > Yes, there is a Frani. She is not a myth.
>
>It's true! For years I didn't think she existed, but then I met her at
>one of the NAEA conferences.
>
>Maggie
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE: Being a New teacher
>From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 17:06:39 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 16
>
>I was lucky in that before I graduated from college I worked at a high
>school art camp (VERY 70's, think hippies), as a teacher and 'counselor'.
>Essentially that meant we bunked in with the kids and taught art classes
>during the week. I knew everything (and more) about high schoolers after
>the
>two summers I did the work (and keep in mind I was barely older than them).
>So, when I student taught and eventually taught, I hit the ground running
>because the nuts and bolts of discipline, studio rules and regs, and taming
>the teen age beast, were no sweat for this seasoned 21 year old (ha..geeze,
>were we EVER that young??). All of these skills were NOT taught by my
>teacher preparedness classes, only theory. I was lucky to be able to see
>'reality' before I taught.
>
>What I find lacking with the many student teachers I have worked with over
>the years is their inability to make sense of it all. What I mean is, they
>seem to be "project to project oriented" and not sequential thinkers where
>one idea and skill builds on another. Most refer back to what they know,
>their college studio classes. Many college studio classes expect students
>to
>have an idea, come prepared with the knowledge of the principles and
>elements, know techniques and skills have motivation, and meet the
>standards
>set by the professor/artist/teacher. I dare say my students need to be
>taught these skills, and need me as the art educator to guide them. We have
>a great articulation program K-12, and when the students from the K-8 come
>to my highschool, they are prepared for the next challenges, where we all
>emphasize what they have learned add to that and build skills, techniques
>and knowledge. I have found with student teachers I have to help them
>think
>this "big picture" through. When asked what lesson they plan to teach, I
>ask
>questions like "why?", "which P&E's are you stressing?", "How many
>thumbnail
>roughs do you expect?" "what is this project leading to". I do not let
>student teachers bounce from one thing to another. Their ideas must
>connect.
>It makes sense to their students, and gives them a feeling of growth and
>success as they visually watch their own journey. I know in my heart, that
>my student teachers will find their own 'voice' when they teach on their
>own. What I hope to do is give them a foundation for that voice.
>
>San D
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 17:35:59 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 17
>
>I can't help but continue the conversation about what may be wrong
>with student teaching programs. I fully sympathize with Diane when
>she says:
> > Right now, the whole university thing seems to be a right of
> > passage...and then you can get
> > out and learn how to teach. Maybe art teachers get a clue about
> > doing this effectively after about 10 years or so.
> > As a teacher educator the state of affairs is disheartening.
>
>I too think the time frame is miserable. Art certification is K-12
>- so they get so many weeks in elementary and so many weeks in
>secondary and as Michal says they are not there in the beginning when
>we establish the class atmosphere. Legally I can never leave an
>uncertified teacher totally in charge of the room. So my presence is
>always there, and my kids behave according to my presence. Also, I
>find the college kids really don't understand what a curriculum is.
>They know lessons and units, but don't know the big picture and they
>don't know how things fit together in sequence. Everything gets
>personalized to what they want to do and they don't know how to look
>at the curriculum expectations. Student teaching is--- here's my
>chance to show off with my best lesson but when it goes wrong?????
>
>I think it is rather shameful that we teachers live under the
>threats and demands of things like NCLB and Standards, and yet our
>student teachers get a couple of weeks to only barely get their feet
>wet. We are faced with so many kinds of problems and expected to be
>the cure-all for all that's wrong. The paper work alone, for dealing
>with special circumstances, is a course in itself. Perhaps the
>statistics on why so many new teachers leave within a short time is
>indicative to something the universities need to look at. I KNOW
>it's lack of preparation and experience that causes this flight.
>
>One of the big problems I see is lack of communication between the
>teacher, student and university supervisor. I came across a study
>some time ago about innovations in the pre-service program. The
>communication was daily and blogs were used for teacher-student,
>student- supervisor, teacher-supervisor and student -student.
>Communication was the key... and a safe place to vent and cry and
>moan without threat of repercussion.
>
>I expect the bottom line is still lack of respect for the teaching
>profession and the skills it takes. One of my colleagues told me
>after a visit to China, that there teachers are regarded as the
>highest profession - higher than doctors, because "somebody has to
>teach the doctors."
>Doctors spend months in residencies. Our teachers a few weeks.... and
>then they are expected to know it all.
>
>My experience with school district New Teacher Induction programs is
>a brief whirlwind of information. If taken seriously there would be
>no time to comprehend it. So the new teachers put in the time and
>then get to what is really important - their classroom. But on top of
>the daily grind, they are expected to attend these meetings, take
>grad classes to meet state requirements for full certification,
>participate in after school activities and then probably have another
>job because their meager salary is not enough to live on.
>
>I just think the student teacher thing has to be more than a few
>hours of observing and a few weeks of practicing. Even for those that
>are "natural" teachers, the time is suspect.
>
>Patty
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 15:38:22 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 18
>
>Maggie,
> That was not Frani you met. I don't know what lady was with me
>at that convention but it wasn't Frani. She has never been to a =20
>convention
>with me. Here she is playing with dolls:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Playing/WithDolls.html
>If I make it to NAEA in New York, next year, I'll bring Frani or perhaps
>a substitute.
> Woody
>
>
>On Jul 14, 2006, at 2:56 PM, Maggie White wrote:
>
> > Woody Duncan wrote:
> >
> >> Yes, there is a Frani. She is not a myth.
> >
> > It's true! For years I didn't think she existed, but then I met =20
> > her at one of the NAEA conferences.
> >
> > Maggie
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to http://www.getty.edu/education/=20
> > teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 15:48:34 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 19
>
>
>On Jul 14, 2006, at 3:06 PM, KPRS2 wrote:
>
> > I I have found with student teachers I have to help them think
> > this "big picture" through. When asked what lesson they plan to =20
> > teach, I ask
> > questions like "why?", "which P&E's are you stressing?", "How many =20
> > thumbnail
> > roughs do you expect?" "what is this project leading to". I do not let
> > student teachers bounce from one thing to another. Their ideas must =20=
>
> > connect.
> > It makes sense to their students, and gives them a feeling of =20
> > growth and
> > success as they visually watch their own journey.
>
>"ideas must connect", a very good way to put it. It took me years to =20
>discover
>this way of teaching. Toward the end, I made sure that each of my =20
>lessons
>sequenced into the next. I tried to start very simple and progress =20
>toward
>more complex concepts. Teaching so the students are aware of the =20
>connections
>is a magical journey. I wish someone had suggested it to me early on.
>
> > I know in my heart, that
> > my student teachers will find their own 'voice' when they teach on =20
> > their
> > own. What I hope to do is give them a foundation for that voice.
>
>Give them guidance and skills and most of all encouragement and they =20
>will
>discover their own voices. It's such a shame that our first years are =20=
>
>using
>our students to train on. But, perhaps every year is that way, or how =20=
>
>else
>do we grow.
> Woody
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>My newest watercolors:
>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Being a New teacher
>From: "Joe & Vickie Magee" <jvmagee@centurytel.net>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 20:47:00 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 20
>
>Well said Michal! I find myself living the life you described to a "t",
>
>"My entire teaching career has not only been filled with my K-12 art
>curriculum, but also that of being a
> wife and mother. With two children who were athletes and active in school
>I
>decided day one of teaching that MY children came first. I spent my school
>days giving 100% to my students, and my evenings giving 100% to my family.
>
>Although my 2 children are both 5 and under I have yet to find time to do
>my
>own art. I started teaching 9 years ago, the first 2-3 years I was
>switching schools and trying to find my rhythm in the districts Once I had
>a handle, along came my family who will always come first! Second my
>students because I love my job and giving everything to my career, outside
>of my family. I dream for the day I can get back to making my own art for
>the sake of creating and doing what I have loved since I was a little girl.
>When I read how determined, passionate, and genuine Staci is about her love
>for art and teaching, I can only say her new school is lucky to find such a
>"gem" to add to their district! We all know many teachers who aren't
>willing to go the extra mile to educate their students. Staci is still
>fresh in her profession.
>
>All educators should keep current with trends, ideas, tools, and the center
>of their content area. I feel I can do that without creating at this point
>in my life/profession. By staying connected with my content area through
>other mediums such as galleries, technology, networking, workshops, and
>list
>servs such as this. I am still learning as an educator and hope I still
>have the same attitude 20 years from now, as an artist, things are on hold
>until I can find "me time" again in my life. I keep a journal of ideas and
>goals for my future work. So as Michal said, "don't guilt those who are
>not
>creating on the side," those same teachers may be exploring other venues
>in
>their professional journey to better themselves as educators, such as
>graduate degrees, curriculum planning, or ceramic workshops for the summer
>:o) Those who are passionate about teaching art do it for the students to
>provide every opportunity for students to create, appreciate, and apply the
>life-long skills they acquire from art education to become a successful
>member of society and the workforce.
>
>Vickie
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: RE:teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 22:33:19 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 21
>
>You are right Maureen, I can be outdated at times.
>Even turning a bit gray from time to time.
>You and I have a few differences on philosophy on
>course work at the high school level. I do not think
>all math classes instruct us to become mathmaticians.
>Actually I know very few math teachers who go home and
>do math in the evening. I hear of the occasional
>teacher of English writing a book or two.I do not look
>at the worth of that teacher as being lesser or better
>because they write a book. The majority of English
>teachers I know go home and grade papers. I think
>education should be to educate. Showing a person how
>to do a technique on a painting destroys the
>possiblity of that piece becoming a candidate for the
>students portfolio. I do not know any math teachers
>who would do a problem on a test for a student and
>let them take credit for it. Seeing it as a learning
>process is something else. We could be arguing over
>split hairs here. Some art teachers have families or
>responsibilities beyond work that prevent them from
>being active artists. When my 3 children were home
>and I was taking master classes I would have had to
>stay up all night to fit in doing my own art work.
>There are seasons of life and a person who is working
>and raising a family cannot go on a guilt trip for not
>doing as much art as they would like. Sometimes it is
>too much like work.
>
>I have entered a new stage of life, my children are
>grown, I finally finished my masters, and I once again
>I have time for my own art. It is great! Do I think I
>was a lesser teacher during my child raising stage.
>Absolutely NOT. That was the best thing for being any
>kind of teacher.
>Do you have a website of your art Maureen like Woody
>does? I would love to see it. Do you currently teach
>as well as coordinate?
>
>Susan in Ohio
>
>--- Maureen <mmorris@theleonardo.org> wrote:
>
> > Susan's sentiment that if artists were that hot,
> > they wouldn't teach is
> > outdated. It goes back to the statement, "Those you
> > can't, teach"
> > Ironically, the best artists I know, do teach, and
> > it is because they can.
> > More and more high school principals in Salt Lake
> > are only hiring art
> > teachers that maintain their own work out/inside of
> > the classroom and that
> > exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching itself
> > is an art form and,
> > believe me, teachers are my heroes because they are
> > capable of so much. How
> > ever, this notion that artists have huge egos is so
> > stereotypical. Art for
> > the gallery is highly competitive. How many of you
> > out there have purchased
> > original artwork from the artists in your
> > communities? It is not an easy
> > path to walk. I personally chose to take something
> > that I was very
> > passionate about, study education alongside my
> > activities as an artist and
> > teach. A fundamental philosophical premise in
> > democracy is this idea that
> > citizens need to be educated. To do that, teachers
> > need to implement
> > strategies that preserve access for diverse
> > students. I am right there with
> > you. Of course, teachers in any subject, including
> > art, need to be able to
> > create classrooms that work for all if not most of
> > the students. As far as
> > artist-teachers painting or drawing on student work,
> > that is a discourse
> > that has gone back many hundred years. It just
> > depends on what side of the
> > fence you sit on. I had no problem with my art
> > teachers demonstrating on my
> > work. It was very useful to me because I knew that I
> > would produce my own
> > work. It is certainly a discussion that can happen
> > with the class. Teachers
> > do need to respect that some students might be put
> > off by it. Many of the
> > students at the high school level (art classes) are
> > considering art careers
> > seriously; they are putting portfolios together for
> > scholarships and many of
> > the skills learned in art classes will be applied in
> > many fields. I
> > personally feel, obviously, that teachers of art
> > should be doing art
> > themselves. Math classes prepare students to become
> > engineers, scientists,
> > etc. Art classes should be preparing students to
> > enter fields that benefit
> > from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable
> > by the way.
> > Maureen, artist, teacher and Art Ed. Coordinator
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> > [mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
> > Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 1:01 AM
> > To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
> > Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006
> >
> > TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, July 13,
> > 2006.
> >
> > 1. Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q?
> > teacherartexchange_?= digest: July
> > 12, 2006
> > 2. motivation
> > 3. Altered books for ceramics?
> > 4. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
> > 5. Re: motivation
> > 6. RE: Altered books for ceramics?
> > 7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
> > 8. Re: Altered books for ceramics?
> > 9. Stopping Hotlinking
> > 10. No Family Left Behind Law
> > 11. Re: No Family Left Behind Law
> > 12. Re: Stopping Hotlinking
> > 13. Re: motivation
> > 14. Re: Yet another twist...
> > 15. Teaching without preparation
> > 16. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
> > 17. etsy.com in ready made magazine
> > 18. Re: Yet another twist...
> > 19. Re: Teaching without preparation
> > 20. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
> > 21. Arches and Mesa Verde
> >
> >
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q?
> > teacherartexchange_?=
> > digest: July 12, 2006
> > From: "Greta Burman" <greta.burman@malmo.se>
> > Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:16:49 +0200
> > X-Message-Number: 1
> >
> > Hej
> > Tack f?r ditt e-mail, jag har semester och ?r
> > tillbaka 24/7
> >
> > Varma sommarh?lsningar
> > Greta
> >
> >
> >
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: motivation
> > From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
> > Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 03:46:30 -0700 (PDT)
> > X-Message-Number: 2
> >
> > I teach HS and have always felt that I was as much
> > manager as teacheres. I discovered a shelf of
> > coaching
> > and motivational books at my library around 658.312
> > on
> > the spine (Dewey Decimal?) Anyway, there is a wealth
> > of help, such as "coaching and mentoring for
> > dummies",
> > which has more background and "100 ways to motivate
> > others" (Chandler), which of course has lots of
> > examples.
> > Some of the concepts are about teaching people how
> > to
> > teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader
> > you
> > would be, focusing on what results you really want
> > rather than just trying, routines.
> > It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> > others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
> > Hope this helps someone.
> > Beth
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> > protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> >
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Altered books for ceramics?
> > From: StacieMich@aol.com
> > Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:35:04 EDT
> > X-Message-Number: 3
> >
> > Hey guys,
> >
> > I'm starting to think of some projects for this
> > upcoming year. I have
> > always
> > loved looking at the examples of altered books many
> > of you have done with
> > your students. Do you think that there would be a
> > way to include a similar
> > project in a ceramics class? I'm trying to think a
> > little outside the
> > box....for
> > once they have the basics of handbuilding, pinch
> > pots and coil pots...just
> > wondering.
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Stacie
> >
> >
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10,
> > 2006
> > From: KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com
> > Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:34:56 -0400
> > X-Message-Number: 4
> >
> > Hi
> > I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator.
> > I have taught
> > with those who are artists first and find them to
> > have difficulties
> > with mega egos. To be really honest if they were all
> > that hot they
> > would not be teaching. It is the same way with math,
> > science etc.
> > Those who are really gifted often do not have a clue
> > as to how to
> > teach others for understanding.I taught for a man
> > that was a "good
> > artist" . When a student did not understand he would
> > just paint right
> > on their work to "fix it" Those of us who remember
> > our struggle in
> > learning often end up having the art of teaching.
> > Way
>=== message truncated ===
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re:Artists as Teachers
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 22:40:21 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 22
>
> Perfectlly stated!
>Susan in Ohio
>
>
>--- Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> > First of all, "please" don't resend the entire
> > digest when you wish
> > to comment on a single topic.
> >
> > On Jul 14, 2006, at 10:03 AM, Maureen wrote:
> >
> > > More and more high school principals in Salt Lake
> > are only hiring art
> > > teachers that maintain their own work out/inside
> > of the classroom
> > > and that
> > > exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching
> > itself is an art form
> > > and,
> > > believe me, teachers are my heroes because they
> > are capable of so
> > > much.
> >
> > I'm an advocate of art teachers being artist , but I
> > would not wish to
> > preclude those who do not work at and exhibit their
> > art from teaching
> > art, especially at the elementary level. I've know
> > many good art
> > teachers who did not pursue their own art.
> >
> > > Of course, teachers in any subject, including art,
> > need to be able to
> > > create classrooms that work for all if not most of
> > the students.
> >
> > NCLB requires us to reach "all" students.
> >
> > > As far as
> > > artist-teachers painting or drawing on student
> > work, that is a
> > > discourse
> > > that has gone back many hundred years.
> >
> > I had a great watercolor workshop instructor who did
> > his critiques by
> > painting on students work. I politely explained that
> > as an old art
> > teacher I preferred that he not touch my paintings.
> > He respected
> > my request.
> >
> > > Art classes should be preparing students to enter
> > fields that benefit
> > > from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable
> > by the way.
> >
> > Most of our students will never go into art as a
> > profession. We need
> > to teach
> > all students to appreciate and understand art. Don't
> > neglect the
> > serious ones
> > but teaching art should be with a very broad brush.
> >
> > Woody
> >
> > Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> > mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
> >
> > 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> > in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes
> > shipping)
> > http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> > Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> > Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
> >
> > ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your
> > artwork
> > is simply to teach you how to make the small
> > fraction
> > of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art
> > & Fear?
> >
> > Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> > Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
> > My newest watercolors:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re:teachers as artists
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 22:44:04 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 23
>
>I think it is good that you have had the time to do
>both. Did family ever take you away from your art
>work?
>Susan in Ohio
>
>
>--- Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Well, once again, someone has touched a nerve among
> > some of us regarding the artist/teacher debate. I
> > have been a professional art educator for over 33
> > years now, and during that time, have maintained a
> > parallel career as a professional level artist. I
> > have actively sold my work in galleries, had several
> > one-person shows, and have made a fair amount of
> > money
> > from my work over the years. I have recently opened
> > a
> > commercial website to sell my work. I have found
> > that
> > being a fine artist is an essential part of my work
> > as
> > an educator. It keeps me in touch with the creative
> > process, models the value of a practical application
> > of art skills, and increases my stature among
> > peers,students and the community. I have worked
> > with
> > many other art teachers who haven't practiced their
> > original disciplines since they graduated from
> > college, and, in my opinion, it has diminished their
> > effectiveness as teachers. Why? Because they seem
> > to
> > have lost empathy and sympathy for the trails and
> > tribulations of creating art, and the considerable
> > practice and discipline involved in the creative
> > process. Having an in-depth understanding of both
> > the
> > process and the product of visual art should be a
> > major part of every art educator. I am an good art
> > teacher because I am an artist,not in spite of it.
> >
> > Vigilance, Jerry
> >
> > Check out my website: www.artguyvilenski.com
> >
> >
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> > protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 22:46:07 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 24
>
>One of the journal questions I ask my high school
>students is "Does a person need to make money from
>their art to be considered a good artist?"
>
>--- Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> > Thank You Maggie,
> > For the many of us who create because we love it
> > and also
> > teach because we love that too. Perhaps we can
> > instill in our young
> > students our passion for art. There is more to
> > making art than
> > making a living doing it. More power to those few
> > who have been
> > able to earn a few bucks at it as well. It is a very
> > competitive
> > market out there. I'm trying to grow with my
> > watercolors since I
> > retired from teaching. I suspect I'll be forever
> > trying to grow.
> > Woody
> >
> > On Jul 13, 2006, at 11:38 AM, Maggie White wrote:
> >
> > > KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com wrote:
> > >
> > >> Hi
> > >> I am glad that Staci is a professional art
> > educator. I have
> > >> taught with those who are artists first and
> > >> find them to have difficulties with mega egos. To
> > be really honest
> > >> if they were all that hot they
> > >> would not be teaching.
> > > Well, with that "honest" assessment you managed to
> > not only
> > > reinforce the adage that "Those who
> > > can, do; those who can't, teach," but you dissed
> > the many
> > > professional teachers who do practice their craft,
> > > exhibit, and sell. What is "hot," anyway? An
> > active exhibition
> > > schedule? Selling regularly? Simply
> > > producing fine works of art for the sheer joy of
> > it? Many
> > > professional artists have a deep love of teaching
> > > and sharing their knowledge, not because they're
> > not-so-hot.
> > >
> > > Maggie
> >
> > Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> > mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
> >
> > 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> > in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes
> > shipping)
> > http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> > Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> > Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
> >
> > ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your
> > artwork
> > is simply to teach you how to make the small
> > fraction
> > of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art
> > & Fear?
> >
> > Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> > Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
> > My newest watercolors:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: No Family Left Behind Law
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 22:55:29 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 25
>
>Thanks for this. I need to read the article. I agree
>with the premise.
>
>--- Harold Olejarz <holejarz@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Hi,
> >
> > This is from Michael Winerip's NYT's column of July
> > 12, 2006
> >
> > "We need a No Family Left Behind Law. This would
> > measure economic
> > growth of families and punish politicians in charge
> > of states with
> > poor economic growth for minority families.
> >
> > FOR example, in Ohio, black families earn only 62
> > percent of white
> > household income, one of the biggest disparities
> > nationally. So every
> > year, under No Family Left Behind, Ohio would be
> > expected to close
> > that income gap. If it failed to make adequate
> > yearly progress for
> > black families' wealth, the governor and legislators
> > would be judged
> > failing, and after five years, could be removed from
> > office. This way
> > public schools wouldn't be the only institutions
> > singled out for
> > failing poor children.
> >
> > And if states succeeded in closing the economic gap,
> > test scores would
> > be expected to rise, giving politicians and teachers
> > a chance to
> > celebrate together."
> >
> >
> > --
> > Harold
> >
> > Harold Olejarz
> > Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
> > Website - www.digitalharold.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
>From: Susan Bennett <seasideblueviolet@yahoo.com>
>Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2006 23:00:37 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 26
>
>I have a bad habit of reading late at night, when I
>get grouchy. I do agree with you. I just feel a person
>should feel as worthy teaching art as just an art
>teacher. I know the list has great artist-teachers out
>there. I know that Woody is. I do notice that his new
>art work has grown tremendously. There is that thing
>about time. I believe once he said it helps having
>someone cook etc for him so he can concentrate on his
>work. So yeah Frannie!!But you are right I did not
>mean it quite like it came out.
>Susan in Ohio
>
>--- wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > uh, susan, i'm sure you didn't mean it in a way that
> > would raise my hackles, but i strongly disagree
> > with:
> > " To be really honest if they were all that hot they
> >
> > would not be teaching." i understand that a "good"
> > artist doesn't always make a good teacher, but here
> > in
> > our online community you can find an abundance of
> > phenomenal artists who are fabulous teachers (even
> > after they retire!). their work in art education
> > and
> > as artists is a huge source of inspiration to me as
> > well as their students, i'm sure. be careful of
> > sweeping generalities!
> >
> > :D wendy
> >
> > wendy
> > www.wendypaigefree.com
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>carltoonz@hotmail.com
>leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu

_________________________________________________________________
Don?t just search. Find. Check out the new MSN Search!
http://search.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200636ave/direct/01/

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html