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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006

---------

From: Maureen (mmorris_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jul 14 2006 - 09:03:01 PDT


 Susan's sentiment that if artists were that hot, they wouldn't teach is
outdated. It goes back to the statement, "Those you can't, teach"
Ironically, the best artists I know, do teach, and it is because they can.
More and more high school principals in Salt Lake are only hiring art
teachers that maintain their own work out/inside of the classroom and that
exhibit their work. I do agree that teaching itself is an art form and,
believe me, teachers are my heroes because they are capable of so much. How
ever, this notion that artists have huge egos is so stereotypical. Art for
the gallery is highly competitive. How many of you out there have purchased
original artwork from the artists in your communities? It is not an easy
path to walk. I personally chose to take something that I was very
passionate about, study education alongside my activities as an artist and
teach. A fundamental philosophical premise in democracy is this idea that
citizens need to be educated. To do that, teachers need to implement
strategies that preserve access for diverse students. I am right there with
you. Of course, teachers in any subject, including art, need to be able to
create classrooms that work for all if not most of the students. As far as
artist-teachers painting or drawing on student work, that is a discourse
that has gone back many hundred years. It just depends on what side of the
fence you sit on. I had no problem with my art teachers demonstrating on my
work. It was very useful to me because I knew that I would produce my own
work. It is certainly a discussion that can happen with the class. Teachers
do need to respect that some students might be put off by it. Many of the
students at the high school level (art classes) are considering art careers
seriously; they are putting portfolios together for scholarships and many of
the skills learned in art classes will be applied in many fields. I
personally feel, obviously, that teachers of art should be doing art
themselves. Math classes prepare students to become engineers, scientists,
etc. Art classes should be preparing students to enter fields that benefit
from strong art backgrounds, which are innumerable by the way.
Maureen, artist, teacher and Art Ed. Coordinator

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2006 1:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: July 13, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, July 13, 2006.

1. Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q? teacherartexchange_?= digest: July
12, 2006
2. motivation
3. Altered books for ceramics?
4. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
5. Re: motivation
6. RE: Altered books for ceramics?
7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
8. Re: Altered books for ceramics?
9. Stopping Hotlinking
10. No Family Left Behind Law
11. Re: No Family Left Behind Law
12. Re: Stopping Hotlinking
13. Re: motivation
14. Re: Yet another twist...
15. Teaching without preparation
16. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
17. etsy.com in ready made magazine
18. Re: Yet another twist...
19. Re: Teaching without preparation
20. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
21. Arches and Mesa Verde

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: *** SPAM ***=?ISO-8859-1?Q? teacherartexchange_?=
digest: July 12, 2006
From: "Greta Burman" <greta.burman@malmo.se>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:16:49 +0200
X-Message-Number: 1

Hej
Tack f?r ditt e-mail, jag har semester och ?r tillbaka 24/7

Varma sommarh?lsningar
Greta

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: motivation
From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 03:46:30 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

I teach HS and have always felt that I was as much
manager as teacheres. I discovered a shelf of coaching
and motivational books at my library around 658.312 on
the spine (Dewey Decimal?) Anyway, there is a wealth
of help, such as "coaching and mentoring for dummies",
which has more background and "100 ways to motivate
others" (Chandler), which of course has lots of
examples.
Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
would be, focusing on what results you really want
rather than just trying, routines.
It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
Hope this helps someone.
Beth

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Altered books for ceramics?
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:35:04 EDT
X-Message-Number: 3

Hey guys,

I'm starting to think of some projects for this upcoming year. I have
always
loved looking at the examples of altered books many of you have done with
your students. Do you think that there would be a way to include a similar
project in a ceramics class? I'm trying to think a little outside the
box....for
once they have the basics of handbuilding, pinch pots and coil pots...just
wondering.

Thanks,

Stacie

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
From: KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:34:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Hi
I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator. I have taught
with those who are artists first and find them to have difficulties
with mega egos. To be really honest if they were all that hot they
would not be teaching. It is the same way with math, science etc.
Those who are really gifted often do not have a clue as to how to
teach others for understanding.I taught for a man that was a "good
artist" . When a student did not understand he would just paint right
on their work to "fix it" Those of us who remember our struggle in
learning often end up having the art of teaching. Way to go Staci I
think you will do a great job.
Susan in Ohio

----- Original Message -----
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Tuesday, July 11, 2006 3:50 pm
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 10,
2006
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Cc: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu

> I think some of us are teachers then artists and some of us are
> artists then teachers...we need both, but either way it's about
> teaching. I've known many people who were great ceramicists or
> painters or mathematicians or whatever who could not
> "teach"...........
> congrats Staci, the school has shown great faith in you and your
> ability to inspire kids and they know that you will do what is
> necessary to lead students technically, even if you're only a day
> ahead of them :-)
> can't wait to hear all your successes~
> creatively, Linda in Oregon
>
>
> Staci is also a fully qualified art teacher
> Heather
> On Jul 11, 2006, at 10:11 AM, M. Austin wrote:
>
> > This school hiring Staci as their new ceramics teacher does not
> > necessarily mean that this school does not fully support the arts.
> > ~Michal
> >> I would have
> >> much preferred the school hire a professional artist and
> teacher.
> >> I just think that when administrators hire
> >> non-artists in general, we/they are doing a disservice to art
> >> education and
> >> not taking it seriously.
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: motivation
From: KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:37:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Helps me. I am glad for a few routines though. Also formal education
on values and shading, perspective, proportion have been good concepts
to teach and help build understanding. Nothing beats a self motivated
person though!
Susan in Ohio

----- Original Message -----
From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
Date: Thursday, July 13, 2006 6:50 am
Subject: [teacherartexchange] motivation
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>

> I teach HS and have always felt that I was as much
> manager as teacheres. I discovered a shelf of coaching
> and motivational books at my library around 658.312 on
> the spine (Dewey Decimal?) Anyway, there is a wealth
> of help, such as "coaching and mentoring for dummies",
> which has more background and "100 ways to motivate
> others" (Chandler), which of course has lots of
> examples.
> Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
> teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
> would be, focusing on what results you really want
> rather than just trying, routines.
> It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
> Hope this helps someone.
> Beth
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Altered books for ceramics?
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 09:54:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Maybe not altered books + clay (other than creating something for a
niche) - but what about bookmaking and clay - just searching and here is
something that you could adapt for your class:
http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/shows_cds/article/0,2045,DIY_15079_3092392
,00.html

also - I we don't have cable - so I don't get to watch many of the shows
(just at the gym when I work out)... but on Carol Duval in August
(8/11/06 @ 1:00 EST) there will be an episode on altered books. Might
be something to tape for a class -=20
Ellen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
From: wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 07:10:33 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

uh, susan, i'm sure you didn't mean it in a way that
would raise my hackles, but i strongly disagree with:
" To be really honest if they were all that hot they
would not be teaching." i understand that a "good"
artist doesn't always make a good teacher, but here in
our online community you can find an abundance of
phenomenal artists who are fabulous teachers (even
after they retire!). their work in art education and
as artists is a huge source of inspiration to me as
well as their students, i'm sure. be careful of
sweeping generalities!

:D wendy

 wendy
www.wendypaigefree.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Altered books for ceramics?
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:15:42 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8

In a message dated 7/13/2006 10:06:20 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ELLEN.SEARS
writes:
just searching and here is
something that you could adapt for your class:
http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/shows_cds/article/0,2045,DIY_15079_3092392
,00.html
Yeah, I don't have the channel either, but thanks for the great web site!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stopping Hotlinking
From: Eleanor Ramsay <eleanor@elramsay.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:43:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Back from vacation and catching up with lots of digests.

A few days ago there was a discussion about how to prevent the
hotlinking of your images.. It is actually not that difficult to
achieve if you have FTP access to your website.

You want to create an .htaccess file. Open a blank page using notepad
(PC) or textedit (Mac). Don't use a word-processing or web editor for
this.

Paste the following in:

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER}
!^http://([-a-z0-9]+\.)?yourdomainname\.com [NC]
RewriteRule \.(gif|jpe?g|png)$ - [F,NC,L]

Change the domain name on line three to your YOUR domain. Leave that
slash in there, it's very important. This line allows you to link to
your own images.

Now, save the page as .htaccess (If you are using a Mac, you should
leave the dot off the beginning and add it when you upload the page.
Rename it on the web server, otherwise you won't be able to see the
page once you've saved it because the Mac makes any page beginning with
a period invisible).

Upload this page in the root (main folder) of your website. If your
site already has an .htaccess file, you can add this information to it.

What this will do is simply prevent all your images from being
hotlinked. You could also add a line to redirect to a different image
but, since bandwidth theft is what you are trying to prevent, that's
never made too much sense to me. There are a lot of good tutorials
explaining this method online. Google: prevent hotlinking .htaccess

OK, back to art-making. :-)

-Eleanor Ramsay
http://www.aecontent.net/aec

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: No Family Left Behind Law
From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:40:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Hi,

This is from Michael Winerip's NYT's column of July 12, 2006

"We need a No Family Left Behind Law. This would measure economic
growth of families and punish politicians in charge of states with
poor economic growth for minority families.

FOR example, in Ohio, black families earn only 62 percent of white
household income, one of the biggest disparities nationally. So every
year, under No Family Left Behind, Ohio would be expected to close
that income gap. If it failed to make adequate yearly progress for
black families' wealth, the governor and legislators would be judged
failing, and after five years, could be removed from office. This way
public schools wouldn't be the only institutions singled out for
failing poor children.

And if states succeeded in closing the economic gap, test scores would
be expected to rise, giving politicians and teachers a chance to
celebrate together."

-- 
Harold
Harold Olejarz
Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
Website - www.digitalharold.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: No Family Left Behind Law
From: "Joe & Vickie Magee" <jvmagee@centurytel.net>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:12:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11
Amen!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2006 9:40 AM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] No Family Left Behind Law
> Hi,
>
> This is from Michael Winerip's NYT's column of July 12, 2006
>
> "We need a No Family Left Behind Law. This would measure economic
> growth of families and punish politicians in charge of states with
> poor economic growth for minority families.
>
> FOR example, in Ohio, black families earn only 62 percent of white
> household income, one of the biggest disparities nationally. So every
> year, under No Family Left Behind, Ohio would be expected to close
> that income gap. If it failed to make adequate yearly progress for
> black families' wealth, the governor and legislators would be judged
> failing, and after five years, could be removed from office. This way
> public schools wouldn't be the only institutions singled out for
> failing poor children.
>
> And if states succeeded in closing the economic gap, test scores would
> be expected to rise, giving politicians and teachers a chance to
> celebrate together."
>
>
> --
> Harold
>
> Harold Olejarz
> Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
> Website - www.digitalharold.com
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Stopping Hotlinking
From: sharon@art-rageous.net
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 11:01:24 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 12
Thanks for the information!  I'd seen something about this on my webhost's
info page but it sounded complicated.  Your explanation makes sense. :-)
> Back from vacation and catching up with lots of digests.
>
> A few days ago there was a discussion about how to prevent the
> hotlinking of your images.. It is actually not that difficult to
> achieve if you have FTP access to your website.
>
> You want to create an .htaccess file. Open a blank page using notepad
> (PC) or textedit (Mac). Don't use a word-processing or web editor for
> this.
>
> Paste the following in:
>
> RewriteEngine    on
> RewriteCond    %{HTTP_REFERER} !^$
> RewriteCond    %{HTTP_REFERER}
> !^http://([-a-z0-9]+\.)?yourdomainname\.com [NC]
> RewriteRule    \.(gif|jpe?g|png)$ - [F,NC,L]
>
> Change the domain name on line three to your YOUR domain. Leave that
> slash in there, it's very important. This line allows you to link to
> your own images.
>
> Now, save the page as .htaccess (If you are using a Mac, you should
> leave the dot off the beginning and add it when you upload the page.
> Rename it on the web server, otherwise you won't be able to see the
> page once you've saved it because the Mac makes any page beginning with
> a period invisible).
>
> Upload this page in the root (main folder) of your website. If your
> site already has an .htaccess file, you can add this information to it.
>
> What this will do is simply prevent all your images from being
> hotlinked. You could also add a line to redirect to a different image
> but, since bandwidth theft is what you are trying to prevent, that's
> never made too much sense to me. There are a lot of good tutorials
> explaining this method online. Google: prevent hotlinking .htaccess
>
> OK, back to art-making. :-)
>
> -Eleanor Ramsay
> http://www.aecontent.net/aec
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: motivation
From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 12:54:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
On Jul 13, 2006, at 6:46 AM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
>
> Some of the concepts are about teaching people how to
> teach themselves, perceiving what kind of a leader you
> would be, focusing on what results you really want
> rather than just trying, routines.
> It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
I would add and expand:
"Teaching how to teach yourself" ... and  teach others.    The whole  
idea behind all the differentiation methods currently being  promoted  
is that kids learn best when the learning is self directed.    We   
teach them how to solve problems and how to use the problem solving  
in all areas.  Peer teaching is a great motivator.   We know the old  
saying  "you learn best when you have to teach it."     Find places  
where the kids can research solutions and then teach each other.  Act  
as facilitator, only interfere when correction is needed.
"Focusing on what results you really want."      This is the crux of  
the "Understanding by Design " curriculum writing.  Start with the  
big question then figure the steps to the culminating outcome.  And  
don't leave the kids out of the process.   They need clear  
expectations. The question for me, is it what "I want" or what will  
give them skills they can transfer to what they want and finding some  
place where we both have wants satisfied.  I still, too often, see  
teachers with certain expectations that have not made evaluation  
clear.  I still too often hear kids in art wondering why they got a B  
or a C on a project when they thought they were doing the right  
thing.  If a student doesn't do as well on a project as she/he  
thought, how do you motivate to the next project?
Sometimes you must give up the routines.     I get bored with my  
routines.
Understanding student learning styles and interests,  I think is  
critical in motivating.     Allowing students to make choices in  
their explorations is highly motivating.  Teaching them to make the  
best choices is our job.  The conventions of art making are practice.  
The kids will do the practice if we give them the choices as to where  
to apply the practice.
> It all starts with the fact that we cannot manage
> others, we can only encourage self motivaton.
I think we can manage.  Teacher training courses are filled with  
management techniques.  Encouraging self motivation is another  
skill.   I think motivation always starts with the best presentation  
from the motivator that there is a reason to be motivated.  Value the  
parts of the process that the student  connects with, build on that,  
and wonder if the product is the best part of the process to  
evaluate.    Keep asking big questions.
Patty
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Yet another twist...
From: The Trains <strain@oise.utoronto.ca>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 13:33:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
This is summer and many camps offer ceramics. Maybe you could 
"volunteer" and get some practical experience.
Shayne
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Teaching without preparation
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 13:35:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
Should art teachers take assignments for which they are not well prepared?
I believe that once a person has good basic preparation in at least one art
specialty, has good art teaching preparation, is passionate about art, and
is passionate about teaching art; the person can learn to teach any art
specialty if they have desire, an average intelligence, and at least average
creativity.  
I have taken on many art teaching assignments for which I was not prepared.
In each case I found that it worked well, but I did a lot of work and
self-preparation.  These are some of the things to PREPARE MYSELF and help
my students LEARN FROM many rich SOURCES OTHER THAN ME.
SELF-PREPARATION:
1.  I sought out teachers who were experienced specialists in the specialty
that I was planning to teach.  I asked them for all the help they were
willing to give.  Some gave me their whole syllabus and all their
assignments and so on.  Most teachers are very generous in this regard.  By
just calling on the phone I got things such as how much work to expect from
students and the range of student expertise I could expect.  I could also
ask them about the main problems they faced and the main things they tried
to include with regard to the final exam and final skill level goals.
2.  Sometimes I took evening or summer classes in the specialty in a nearby
university art dept. 
3.  I bought books, journals, and checked out lots of library books and
magazines.
4.  I bought art materials and equipment to try things.  Sometimes I set up
a studio at home where I could experiment and practice in private.
5.  In some cases I hired advanced students to give me private tutoring in
the technical aspects of the subject.  A high school teacher may want to
find a college student who has mastered a special skill.  The college
student will work cheap and be able to use this experience in her own
resume.  College instructors are willing to name students who are best
qualified to do this.
SOURCES OTHER THAN ME for my students to learn:
1.  I sought out video programs that covered all the special technical
skills that I lacked.  I have learned an amazing amount of art skills and
very interesting gimmicks and trivia from educational videos that I rented
or purchased for my students to watch. 
2.  I made sure the students had a good textbook covering the special area
so that they always had more than just me to find technical help.
3.  I had a collection of library books available and I assigned students to
always have at least one library book checked out related to the subject we
were learning.  I brought in piles of back issues of the magazines related
to the area I was teaching.  I brought in my own books.
4.  I assigned student reports.  Each student had to research one artist
within the specialty or one technique in the specialty and present an
illustrated class report with an emphasis on the thinking and feeling behind
the work. Why did artists do what they did?  What motivated them?
5.  I gave assignments for them to find and prepare handouts with a list of
annotated Internet resources where other students students could find
answers to technical questions.
6.  I hired one or more advanced students to come in and assist beginning
students overcome difficulties during practice sessions.  This was generally
very good for both the learners and the teachers, but advanced students need
to be told never to do the work for the beginner, and never to give artistic
suggestions--only technical oversight.  Beginners must make their own
artistic and design choices.  Tutors are allowed to ask open questions when
coaching for artistic ideas and choices.
7.  I brought local professionals into the classroom to make presentations
about their lives and work.  Students were required to prepare questions
that they could ask the professional.
8.  We took field trips to the studios of professionals.  Students were
required to prepare questions that they would ask the professional.
9.  When students asked me questions that I could not expertly answer, I did
not answer them. I tried to ask them how we could experiment to find the
answer to the question or where we might go to look for the answer.  In
general, I do not think I should make many suggestions or answer many
student questions even when I am an expert.  Even when I know an answer I
often to not give it because I think it is better for students to learn to
experiment.  Mistakes are okay because they can be examined for creative
ideas and they are a very memorable form of learning.
STUDENT FEEDBACK
I learned that it was a good idea to ask the students for feedback.  I ask
what they want to learn and what they think would make the class a better
learning experience for them.  Doing this early during the course and at
mid-term tends to result in better student satisfaction at the end of the
term.  I never push it too hard and I never depend on the students to design
the course because they are seldom able to do it very well, but they do
appreciate it if I ask for their opinions, and if I make a few improvements
based on their ideas (if I can with integrity).  It also reminds them to
take some responsibility for the quality of their own education.
Marvin Bartel
Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171   
http://www.bartelart.com
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
"You can't ever know how you actually do it before you teach it to somebody
else."  ... said by many old art teachers
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 10:38:27 -0700
X-Message-Number: 16
KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com wrote:
>Hi
>I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator.  I have taught 
>with those who are artists first and find them to have difficulties 
>with mega egos. To be really honest if they were all that hot they 
>would not be teaching. 
>
Well, with that "honest" assessment you managed to not only reinforce 
the adage that "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach," but you 
dissed the many professional teachers who do practice their craft, 
exhibit, and sell.  What is "hot," anyway?  An active exhibition 
schedule?  Selling regularly?  Simply producing fine works of art for 
the sheer joy of it?  Many professional artists have a deep love of 
teaching and sharing their knowledge, not because they're not-so-hot.
Maggie
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: etsy.com in ready made magazine
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 14:42:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17
An article in the current issue of Ready-Made about Etsy.com
A place to buy all things handmade... launched last June.  I think you
can also commission -=20
Fun place if you haven't already been there -=20
Ellen
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Yet another twist...
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:36:17 EDT
X-Message-Number: 18
In a message dated 7/13/2006 1:40:32 PM Eastern Daylight Time, writes:
This is summer and many camps offer ceramics. Maybe you could 
"volunteer" and get some practical experience.
This is actually what I've started doing!  I've gone twice and am going back
tomorrow.  They have two more weeks of camp, so I'm going to try to go as 
often as I can.  They've already been so helpful!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching without preparation
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:40:44 EDT
X-Message-Number: 19
In a message dated 7/13/2006 2:04:41 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Marvin
writes:
These are some of the things to PREPARE MYSELF and help my students LEARN 
FROM many rich SOURCES OTHER THAN ME.
Thanks, these are great tips!  I've already done some legwork...I've started
volunteering at a ceramics camp, I've taken my first private wheel lesson,
and 
I'm siging up for a ceramics class at my university in August.  I've bought 
some books and plan on going to the library.  I'm trying to make it my job
to 
learn a little bit about ceramics every day.  Between that and painting for
my 
upcoming graduate course, I'm keeping very busy.  It's going to be good for
me 
though, I know it.  Thanks again!!!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 10, 2006
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 15:30:37 -0600
X-Message-Number: 20
Thank You Maggie,
	For the many of us who create because we love it and also
teach because we love that too. Perhaps we can instill in our young
students our passion for art. There is more to making art than
making a living doing it. More power to those few who have been
able to earn a few bucks at it as well. It is a very competitive
market out there. I'm trying to grow with my watercolors since I
retired from teaching. I suspect I'll be forever trying to grow.
						Woody
On Jul 13, 2006, at 11:38 AM, Maggie White wrote:
> KBENNETT3@woh.rr.com wrote:
>
>> Hi
>> I am glad that Staci is a professional art educator.  I have =20
>> taught with those who are artists first and
>> find them to have difficulties with mega egos. To be really honest =20=
>> if they were all that hot they
>> would not be teaching.
> Well, with that "honest" assessment you managed to not only =20
> reinforce the adage that "Those who
> can, do; those who can't, teach," but you dissed the many =20
> professional teachers who do practice their craft,
> exhibit, and sell.  What is "hot," anyway?  An active exhibition =20
> schedule?  Selling regularly?  Simply
> producing fine works of art for the sheer joy of it?  Many =20
> professional artists have a deep love of teaching
> and sharing their knowledge, not because they're not-so-hot.
>
> Maggie
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM    87199-1703
=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.=94              from: =93Art & Fear=94
Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
My newest watercolors:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Arches and Mesa Verde
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2006 21:48:40 -0600
X-Message-Number: 21
The Southwest is an artist's paradise. I'm trying to introduce it's =20
landscape
to the triplets a little bit at a time. Here are a few pics from our =20
recent visit
to Arches (in Utah) and Mesa Verde (in Colorado).
http://www.taospaint.com/MesaVerde/andArches.html
I'm actually in a couple of the photos. I'm usually behind the lens.
						Woody
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM    87199-1703
=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.=94              from: =93Art & Fear=94
Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
My newest watercolors:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
---
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