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[teacherartexchange] Fwd: Suggestions & Criticism Welcome!

---------

From: Holly Wells (hollyatwerk_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Jul 21 2005 - 10:39:32 PDT


 
> Hello,
> I'm currently an "Art Professional in training" with
> less than a year left toward my undergraduate
> studies in Studio Art with a concentration in
> sculpture and minor in art history.
>
> I'm putting together an informal report on
> "Effective Teaching" for one of my courses
> (specifically geared toward high school studio/fine
> art - which is my goal). If anyone has any
> information, suggestions, specific criteria
> requirements, or resources that can be passed onto
> me to further the accuracy and development of my
> report, I'd greatly appreciate it. I've been
> searching on line regarding this topic and have
> found some helpful results; however, I'd like to
> collect additional material regarding required
> criteria of California high schools.
>
> I'm also constructing an example syllabus of what
> would typically found in courses of this level.
> Thus far, it's based on what I believe to be the
> beginning steps of studying art and what I remember
> actually studying in high school and my early 2-D,
> 3-D, and Intro to Drawing college courses. If
> anyone has a moment, please review it and feel free
> to criticize and/or make suggestions. My current
> hang up is regarding how much time students would
> actually need to complete the projects which in turn
> reflect how many projects are assigned. (Side note:
> vocab quizzes and critiques are not included.)
> Anyway, here's what I have so far:
>
> Assignment 1: Grid Drawing - enlarging an image
> based on a grid using scale (ie: 1"= 1/4") then
> painting it.
>
> Assignment 2: Color Wheel - primary, secondary,
> tertiary, monochromatic, achromatic, analogous
> colors. Painting a color chart by mixing of colors.
> Also, shades and tones will be covered here.
>
> Assignment 3: Positive and Negative Space - what is
> it? Several charcoal/pencil drawings of negative
> space incorporating a view finder.
>
> Assignment 4: "Letters as forms" collage -
> exploring individual letters and their characters as
> forms through different fonts. Here they'll choose
> from an array of letters and characters in different
> fonts which have been blown up to about 2" and cut
> out. They'll first arrange them in a well balanced
> and interesting composition using design
> elements/vocabulary (which will be covered). Next,
> they'll enlarge each letter form to various sizes
> (starting at a 3" scale or larger using the grid
> technique) then transfer them onto illustration
> board (18"x20"). From here, they'll incorporate
> what they learned about achromatic color schemes and
> shades into the new drawing. The board will be
> broken up into various segments and they will shade
> in specific parts using the specified formula using
> drawing pencils (2H - 6B).
>
> Assignment 5: Still life/contour drawings -
> learning to draw without the grid, learning to
> render line, shape, shades, etc. by careful study
> and observation. The student will be given the
> choice if they want to complete the projects using
> paint, color pencil, charcoal, pencil, or pen.
> Beginning drawings will have at home assignments
> given (ie: give me 5 contour drawings from several
> different objects at home.)
>
> Assignment 6: Planes and collage - the student will
> bring an image, picture, or cut out from a magazine
> or where ever, and they'll break up the picture into
> planes (no more than 5 planes). Next they'll blow
> up their image to fit the inside frame of the
> illustration board (ex: 11x17). Each plane will be
> sectioned out into individual planes. Next they'll
> cut illustration board to match each plane.
> Starting from the back plane working their way to
> the front plane (or from background to foreground)
> they'll collage each plane illustrating elements or
> objects within each plane keeping in mind color,
> texture, and design. Finally, the individual planes
> will be stacked and glued for a complete
> composition.
>
> Assignment 7: Paper Mache - exploring a simple
> technique as sculpture. Learning to "make your hands
> do what your head says" as my sculpture professor
> always says. The project itself is subject to
> change depending on the time of the year. Usually
> it will be something festive (ie: pumpkin for
> Halloween). It's open for the students to give
> their rendition of the season. They will have some
> leeway here; however, it will be painted.
>
> Assignment 8: FINAL Presentation/Report- A minimum 3
> page report (double spaced, MLA format) on any
> artist. They must specify the genre, give a brief
> history of period, artist, and specific work chosen
> to discuss. They must implement vocabulary as well
> as descriptive details and elements learned
> throughout the course. The student will bring in a
> slide or image of the work they are presenting. In
> class presentation portion will be 5 - 10 mins.
> (Must be approved by instructor).
>
> Again, any suggestions or criticism is certainly
> recommended and welcome. I apologize for taking up
> so much time; however, this seemed like a great
> place to hear from the best!
>
> Thank you so much for you time.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Holly A. Wells
>
>
> TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, July 20,
> 2005.
>
> 1. Julian Beever's pavement drawings chalk on
> sidewalk amazing 3D illusion
> 2. RE: Elliot Eisner on choice
> 3. Basic Strategies in Reading Photographs
> 4. Literacy project in Northport-East Northport Sch
> District Art Dept nice Art and Reading Info
> 5. Re: still-life drawing
> 6. Re: Still Life Drawing
> 7. Re: Elliot Eisner on choice
> 8. Re: important concepts to teach kids
> 9. Photo website being developed
> 10. RE: important concepts to teach kids
> 11. More finding meaning
> 12. Abstract or concrete
> 13. Re: middle school lessons
> 14. Re: Re:middle school lessons
> 15. important concepts vs teaching for tests
> 16. RE:Project for roll of film?
> 17. still lifes all the same?
> 18. Re: Abstract or concrete
> 19. Re: important concepts vs teaching for tests
> 20. Re:middle school lessons
> 21. Re: Re:middle school lessons
> 22. Important concepts
> 23. Re: still-life drawing
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Julian Beever's pavement drawings chalk on
> sidewalk amazing 3D illusion
> From: "Christine Besack"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 06:54:01 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi All, Some of you may be familiar with this
> artist, but this is the first
> time I have seen it.
> This artwork is amazing, his sidewalk art is
> astounding with the illusion of
> 3D. Viewing angle is everything,
> it will make you really think. Looking at these
> yesterday was a welcomed
> break from my humid stressful day.
> Advanced art HS or College could do this as a
> lesson.
> All of that work, for temporary art. Makes you
> believe in Art for Art's sake
> again !
>
> http://users.skynet.be/J.Beever/pave.htm
>
> Enjoy,
> Christine Besack :)
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Elliot Eisner on choice
> From: "KPRS2"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:07:52 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
> >I, too, am standards driven.<
>
>
---------------------------------------------------------------
> Perhaps I have been at this too long, but it seems
> to me that when
> "standards" (that's what 'it's' called now) became
> emphasized in districts,
> teachers started to shift their thinking, instead of
> realizing that a good
> teacher already covers all of those 'standards' and
> much more. I haven't
> found 'standard based teaching' a problem, on the
> contrary, I have found it
> to be a creative challenge, and in many ways an 'eye
> opener' for those
> non-academic teachers and administrators who truly
> do NOT "know" what an art
> educator does and has been doing.
>
> San D
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Basic Strategies in Reading Photographs
> From: "Christine Besack"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:12:16 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hi All, Link to a site about reading photographs.
> The main site www.nuovo.com
> has great art examples also !!!!!
> blurb from site ---
>
> "Basic Strategies in Reading Photographs
> Of course, you know what you like. But would you
> like to know more about how
> a photograph is composed? By learning what visual
> elements the artist uses
> to communicate with you, you may appreciate better
> why you like or don't
> like a particular work of art. "
>
> http://nuovo.com/southern-images/analyses.html
>
> Hope this helps,
> CB :)
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Literacy project in Northport-East
> Northport Sch District Art Dept nice Art and Reading
> Info
> From: "Christine Besack"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:13:42 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Hi All,
> Here is a link to a district wide literacy project
> in a NY school district.
> The link below is information what they are doing in
> terms of the Arts and
> Reading. Anyone out there happen to teach in this
> district. I'd love to hear
> from someone practicing these strategies.
> I love the current thread on the Getty list now.
> Great discussions. Elements
> and Principles, Eisner, Big Questions.
> Yes Yes Yes , back to semi normal Art Ed food for
> thought !!!
>
>
http://northport.k12.ny.us/aspiration/departments/art/index.html
>
> I am planning to present at my state conference in
> October on Art and
> Literacy strategies. Just beginning to gather info.
>
> Hope this helps,
> Christine Besack :)
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: still-life drawing
> From: wendy free
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 05:28:30 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> the still lifes were by hs art 1's - mostly 9th
> grade.
>
> wendy
>
> --- "@home" wrote:
>
> > Wendy,
> > Thanks for the input. What grade level do you
> > teach?
> > BF
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "wendy free"
> > To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> >
> > Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2005 6:33 PM
> > Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] still-life
> drawing
> >
> >
> > > we have six still lifes that students choose
> from.
> > > this year we looked at/talked about janet fish
> for
> > > inspiration. her still lifes can be very
> > > autobiographical. she puts family, dogs in the
> > > background sometimes, or a favorite place. a top
> > > objective for my students was to make the still
> > life
> > > theirs - add/change/stylize so that the still
> life
> > > they represented wasn't just a bunch of weird
> > stuff i
> > > set up. some examples are here:
> > > http://f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/wendypaigefree
> > >
> > > (go to EHS still life 2005)
> > >
> > > :D wendy free
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> __________________________________________________
> > > Do You Yahoo!?
> > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> > protection around
> > > http://mail.yahoo.com
> > >
> > > ---
> > > To unsubscribe go to
> > >
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Still Life Drawing
> From: lindwood@webtv.net
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:16:28 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> I set up two still lifes when I teach still life
> drawing. One is on a
> cart that I move out to the center of the room so
> that students can view
> it from all sides. The other is set up on a table
> against the wall and
> can only be viewed from the front and sides.
> Another thing I did when I had my kids draw the
> still life shells was to
> glue the shells with Elmers school glue (washable,
> can break it down
> later if I want) to small pieces of matt board. That
> way we could pick
> them up and move them from the center of each
> drawing table to the area
> where I stored them inbetween uses. I wrote a small
> number for each
> table in the corner of the matt board to make it
> easy to identify which
> shell group went to each table the following class.
> I like variety and
> kids appreciate the choice.
>
> Linda
>
> Visit our Lower and Middle School Art Gallery Sites:
> www.sjs.org
> Click on Arts, Lower School or Middle School,
> Gallery
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Elliot Eisner on choice
> From: "M. Austin"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:31:52 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> What I have found by teaching (and documenting
> standards taught) the
> standards is that it also makes you aware of what
> you are not teaching, and
> what you barely cover. I will admit to extreme
> frustration when I was first
> asked to document not only my art standards that I
> was teaching, but also
> which math and reading standards were being taught.
> I told my administrator
> that that was 13 standards per subject I was being
> asked to familiarize
> myself with. Luckily, she saw my point and now just
> asks me to document what
> vocabulary words and concepts I am covering for
> these other subjects. I find
> that being required to incorporate reading and math
> actually adds depth to
> my lessons. Now, I do tesselations with 4th grade,
> because some of the
> tested standards are rotation, translation, and
> (summer brain dead here -
> there is another math vocabulary word here). The
> first year I did this with
> 4th grade, EVERY student passed those questions,
> where the year before we
> had 33% of the students pass them. In an age where
> budgets are being cut
> drastically, having your administrator know that you
> specifically helped
> boost those scores is a tremendous benefit to you
> and your program.
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
> >>I, too, am standards driven.<
> >
> >
>
---------------------------------------------------------------
> > Perhaps I have been at this too long, but it seems
> to me that when
> > "standards" (that's what 'it's' called now) became
> emphasized in
> > districts,
> > teachers started to shift their thinking, instead
> of realizing that a good
> > teacher already covers all of those 'standards'
> and much more. I haven't
> > found 'standard based teaching' a problem, on the
> contrary, I have found
> > it
> > to be a creative challenge, and in many ways an
> 'eye opener' for those
> > non-academic teachers and administrators who truly
> do NOT "know" what an
> > art
> > educator does and has been doing.
> >
> > San D
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: important concepts to teach kids
> From: Maggie Tucker
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:20:58 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> I have been reading this exchange with interest. Pam
> and Diane, I view
> your role as challengers of the norm, asking us to
> think before we do.
> That being said, I wonder how you would, if only
> being given 4 1/2
> weeks--or 9 weeks-- with your pre-service art
> education students--what
> would you teach? The abstract or the concrete?
> While as an artist I agree that the big questions
> need to well up, I know
> how cheated I felt in the mid-to-late 1970's, when I
> got my b.f.a. All
> painting courses were non-objective. My drawing
> skills were nil, due to a
> junior high/high school bias toward art as
> expression.
> Without knowing the syntax, how can you articulate?
> It's only since I've taught myself the basics,
> alongside my students, that
> I've become proficient enough to really create. I
> relish my capability now.
> P&E's,can be really really cardboardish in the hands
> of instructors who
> present and evaluate via "checklists." But how else
> to evaluate?
> (Envision, Diane, a parent-teacher conference
> regarding big ideas. Argh.)
> Love the thinking.
> Mags
>
> >time my students reach middle school they have a
> firm understanding of these
> >concepts and I then focus my middle school students
> on experimenting with
> >mediums and beginning to allow them more choices in
> their own art making. My
> >high school students are then encouraged to focus
> on their own interests
> >within the assignments. I think that if you don't
> give the students a
> >foundation on which to build they will forever
> struggle. I
> Maggie Tucker
>
> arttucker@earthlink.net
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Photo website being developed
> From: Harold Olejarz
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 09:52:57 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Hi,
>
> This is the first few paragraphs from an article in
> today's NY Times:
>
> July 20, 2005
> Amassing a Treasury of Photography
>
> By RANDY KENNEDY
> In 1999 two proud powerhouses of photography - the
> George Eastman
> House in Rochester and the International Center of
> Photography in
> Midtown - began to acknowledge that they needed each
> other.
>
> More specifically, officials at the Eastman House -
> the world's oldest
> photography museum, with more than 400,000 photos
> and negatives,
> dating back to the invention of the medium - felt
> that they needed a
> New York City presence. And the International
> Center, a younger
> institution with a smaller collection, wanted access
> to Eastman's vast
> holdings, which include work by Ansel Adams, Alfred
> Stieglitz, Edward
> Steichen and Lazlo Moholy-Nagy.
>
> The collaboration resulted in several joint
> exhibitions, including
> "Young America: The Daguerreotypes of Southworth and
> Hawes," still on
> display at the center, and a show that ended earlier
> this year of the
> striking photographs of New Orleans prostitutes from
> the early 1900's
> by E. J. Bellocq, images that were drawn roughly
> half from Eastman and
> half from the center.
>
> But now both institutions are at work on an
> ambitious project to
> create one of the largest freely accessible
> databases of masterwork
> photography anywhere on the Web, a venture that will
> bring their
> collections to much greater public notice and
> provide an immense
> resource for photography aficionados, both scholars
> and amateurs.
>
> The Web site - Photomuse.org, now active only as a
> test site, with a
> smattering of images - is expected to include almost
> 200,000
> photographs when it is completed in the fall of
> 2006, and as both
> institutions work out agreements with estates and
> living
> photographers, the intention is to add tens of
> thousands more
> pictures.
> --=20
> Harold Olejarz
> www.olejarz.com
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: important concepts to teach kids
> From: "LarrySeiler"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 08:59:18 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> I'm going to agree with Ken on this...for one, I
> begin with the premise that
> the visual arts are a form of language.
>
> You do not place yourself in a foreign country with
> language unknown and
> begin a meaningful dialog, at least not if your
> intentions are to be
> understood. You must refer to a guide, or develop
> language abilities.
>
> This is not to say that meaning and the "why" we and
> others make art is not
> at the same time infused with the foundational
> tools.
>
> I begin this right from the earliest of elementary
> ages thru
> highschool...artists are visual communicators.
> Writers, speakers make use
> of an alphabet, grammatical rules, enunciation and
> diction...and creative
> individuals using that form of communication attempt
> to construct the
> formation of written or spoken language to bring
> forth meaningful dialog. A
> dialog of ideas receiving rubber to be put forth to
> the road.
>
> Line families, shapes, color, mass, values,
> textures...all things visible
> are the means the artist will communicate. Clearly
> this has to be
> understood as a distinction of that which makes an
> artist a VISUAL artist,
> otherwise one might be an author, or a speaker, a
> poet or musician. All are
> artists of their form...
>
> Eventually the why that mankind feels the need to
> express themselves is
> considered and referred to. That too may come in
> small sound bytes...little
> here, little there until it becomes and holds a
> greater place in the
> curriculum.
>
> I see another problem, and I think I will get flak
> for this...but it won't
> alter my thinking because others might disagree. As
> an adult I'm prepared
> to state things, to communicate and stand by them.
>
> I think we have to be careful in how we guide
> students, especially young
> children...in looking at the world to attempt and
> understand and draw
> meaning.
>
> If everyone knew what lawyers knew...there would be
> no need for lawyers. If
> everyone knew what doctors knew...there would be no
> need for doctors. If
> everyone knew what adults knew, there would be no
> childhood.
>
> Adults develop coping mechanisms to deal with that
> which will require adult
> decision making, that which will keep potential
> crisis in balance or even
> keel. Adults look at the world with more
> understanding and experience to
> determine how things should affect their feelings,
> reactions,
> responsibilities.
>
> Unfortunately...childhood is an endangered stage of
> human development...most
> losing their innocence over the past couple decades
> or so...seeing violence,
> decadence, things that instill fear..all things by
> which adults alone at one
> time were privy to.
>
> In a literary society...adults could determine when
> children were prepared
> and equipped to have access to certain literary
> volumes and help guide young
> people to preparedness...but today everything is a
> click or button
> away...television, videos and dvd's, the internet,
> magazines...the music.
> Personally...I think that major student problems in
> discipline,
> personalities filled with bitterness, filled with
> anxiety...fears...anger
> and so forth and many disruptive behaviors is a
> product of children
> experiencing, witnessing and having to process adult
> information.
>
> We of course cannot turn the time or wheel back on
> such things in our
> culture, but it helps to be aware of it and in so
> being aware, more careful
> of our own contributions that may cause kids to
> confront adult things. We
> have to be a little careful that in guiding children
> to consider the bigger
> questions, we aren't attempting to stir up
> frightening aspects of hidden
> repressed things.
>
> Art can be about celebration...and there can be much
> about our world that
> holds awe and mystery that in childhood can be
> explored and celebrated. We
> have to be careful not to be so gung ho and presume
> the role of social
> engineering that we are robbing children of their
> childhood. It would
> require quite a knowledge and sensitivity on the
> part of the art teacher
> whom would be nearly acting as a therapist and
> sociologist, a philosopher to
> confidently travel this road...but at what risk,
> what cost?
>
> So...one has to be careful in constructing their
> bigger questions to
> children in lieu of a world that has introduced a
> great deal of confusion,
> pain and challenges that require adult maturity and
> adult broadened
> experiences. A world many adults are not prepared
> such questions to ask.
>
> I'm not saying don't ask questions...but regard
> childhood a thing to value.
> Be aware that childhood has been robbed...and that
> many young hearts might
> not be prepared for such inquiry.
>
> I think moderation...patience to let inquiry
> naturally develop along the
> road of understanding the mechanisms that comprise
> visual arts as a language
> is wise. As children mature and are ready, able to
> consider major adult
> questions without detriment...encouraging their
> consideration that artists
> are people that tackle questions of meaning, take on
> perplexing issues and
> use their art as responses, statements is
> appropriate.
>
> One will have to get to know their students...as
> well as perhaps their
> surrounding culture, their home life. After
> all...that is what a social
> engineer and the therapists would have to do, no?
>
> I side with caution. Preserve childhood. Make it
> fun...learn the language
> of art that artists use and have developed over
> time...little by little make
> it personal, help them grow into confident teens.
>
> just my opinion....and further, I'm sticking to
> it....
>
> Larry S.
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: More finding meaning
> From: "Pam"
>
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 06:59:42 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> >>Now, I do tesselations with 4th grade, because
> some of the
> tested standards are rotation, translation, and
> (summer brain dead here -
> there is another math vocabulary word here).<<
>
>
>
> Reflection is the word you are seeking.
>
>
>
> This brings up a good point and thus brings us back
> to finding meaning in
> works of art. Last year I was asked to deliver a
> talk at the Flagstaff
> Mayor's Breakfast (a gathering of school and
> district administrators as well
> as the state superintendent of schools). I was asked
> to address the reasons
> that art should be included in every curriculum. As
> a proponent of art in
> the curriculum, it was assumed that I would give
> reasons for art supporting
> other content areas. That didn't happen;
> nonetheless, the talk was well
> received and I have sense developed it into a Power
> Point presentation on
> advocacy that has been presented in several venues
> around the country.
>
>
>
> I've posted my entire talk before, so I won't post
> the entire thing again,
> but I'll give a few paragraphs of what was said:
>
>
>
> =========================
>
> ...Like all good art - whether old or new - cave
> paintings offer up many
> questions to consider. They cause us to think in
> divergent, but logical ways
> to find the answers to the questions that they pose.
>
>
>
> Art, in whatever form, makes us think. And doesn't
> good thinking support
> quality education?
>
>
>
> The visual arts, when taught correctly and
> appropriately, develop deep
> thinkers.
>
>
>
> If we look at the Profile of College-Bound Seniors
> compiled by the College
> Board in 2002, we find that in 2002 those students
> who scored the best on
> SAT verbal and mathematics assessments were those
> students whose coursework
> in high school included the arts.
>
>
>
> This probably seems like a good argument for keeping
> the arts in the
> curriculum-to include the arts as support for the
> so-called core curriculum.
> But I am not saying that at all. I will never offer
> that argument.
>
>
>
> The visual arts are a worthy course of study within
> and of themselves. There
> is no reason that the visual arts should be included
> as a support system or
> the handmaiden to any other content area.
>
>
>
> Let me make one thing absolutely clear. There are
> significant links between
> and among the arts and other content areas and I am
> a tremendous proponent
> of teaching through the arts to make meaningful
> connections. To give kids
> the "ah ha" that is often missing in isolated
> studies.
>
>
>
> If what I have said sounds contradictory-that I
> promote the teaching of
> interdisciplinary connections, but I do not promote
> the concept of the arts
> as a support system, give me a moment to explain.
> There is a world of
> difference between teaching THROUGH the arts and
> USING the arts.
>
>
>
> Consider this:
>
> Research shows us that kids who are taught to
> question and to support their
> answers with reasoned responses are the kids who do
> better in the studies
> across the curriculum. These are the kids who stay
> in school.
>
>
>
> Learning to questions and respond with reasoned and
> supported answers is
> what the visual arts are about....
>
> ==================
>
>
>
> I think that it is of vital importance that art
> educations keep art central
> to learning and that centrality translates to
> finding meaning in works of
> art. It is perfectly acceptable to teach through
> Escher's tessellations (or
> any other work of art) if students are asked to seek
> meaning. When the
> artwork becomes nothing but a support system wherein
> students count the
> trees in a landscape or figure out the type of cloud
> in the sky, that is
> using a work of art.
>
>
>
> From Sedona,
>
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the
> French Riviera
> Space is limited --- E-mail this address for details
> ____________________________________________________
> For art teaching resources, professional
> development, & travel, visit:
> www.ArtResourcesforTeachers.com
> ____________________________________________________
> For information about the NAU art education program:
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Abstract or concrete
> From: "Pam"
>
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 07:10:23 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> Hi, Maggie:
>
> >>I have been reading this exchange with interest.
> Pam and Diane, I view
> your role as challengers of the norm, asking us to
> think before we do.
> That being said, I wonder how you would, if only
> being given 4 1/2
> weeks--or 9 weeks-- with your pre-service art
> education students--what
> would you teach? The abstract or the concrete?<<
>
> First let me say that I taught at the elementary
> level for 11 years and then
> spent another four as a mentor for TETAC. I know the
> challenges of seeing
> kids only a few moments each week or every other
> week or whatever. The last
> elementary where I taught had the additional
> challenge of being a United
> Nations sort of place with about 23 cultures and 50
> plus languages at any
> given time.
>
> Now, let me explain how my pre-service courses are
> set up. I have a
> learner-centered, problem-based program wherein
> students identify a problem
> to solve and they solve it during the course of the
> semester. So, from that
> standpoint, I deal with the abstract to the
> concrete. In addition to this,
> there is a continual thread through the semester
> that requires reading and
> discussion of text.
>
> In my own college experience I found too much theory
> and not enough
> practical application. My students get a balance. I
> expect them to
> demonstrate knowledge through application.
> Pencil/paper tests are not my
> mode of evaluating what student know. They have to
> demonstrate knowledge
> through application.
>
> To answer your question, abstract or concrete, I
> couldn't pick one or the
> other. My teaching is a blend. Both are important to
> learning and to the
> development of quality art teachers.
>
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the
> French Riviera
> Space is limited --- E-mail this address for details
> ____________________________________________________
> For art teaching resources, professional
> development, & travel, visit:
> www.ArtResourcesforTeachers.com
> ____________________________________________________
> For information about the NAU art education program:
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: middle school lessons
> From: Terry Marney
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 11:49:11 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> Vicki, this year my 7th & 8th graders started the
> semester with "Graffiti Art". We talked about the
> difference between art & vandalism, to begin with
> and
> we look at a few samples of very talented graffiti
> artists. I have students come up with 3 different
> ideas for a design and before they begin their final
> one, I go over one-point perspective. They practice
> doing their name in block letters, going back in
> space
> in one-point perspective. Then, if they choose to
> use
> that in their final artwork, they may. I give them a
> lot of freedom of choice in this one because their
> graffiti should reflect their personality, however,
> I
> do require that it take up the entire 9x11 page.
> They
> may use colored pencil, markers, or both. This has
> been a very successful lesson. They learn a little
> about complimentary colors, analogous colors,
> symmetrical & asymmetrical balance, and start to
> become familiar with the elements & principles. It's
> also a good beginning lesson because it helps me to
> remember their names!
> Terry
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Re:middle school lessons
> From: "M. Austin"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 13:58:45 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> This sounds interesting, but I'm having trouble
> visualizing the final
> graffiti connection. Do you have images you could
> share?
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
> > Vicki, this year my 7th & 8th graders started the
> > semester with "Graffiti Art". We talked about the
> > difference between art & vandalism, to begin with
> and
> > we look at a few samples of very talented graffiti
> > artists. I have students come up with 3 different
> > ideas for a design and before they begin their
> final
> > one, I go over one-point perspective. They
> practice
> > doing their name in block letters, going back in
> space
> > in one-point perspective. Then, if they choose to
> use
> > that in their final artwork, they may. I give them
> a
> > lot of freedom of choice in this one because their
> > graffiti should reflect their personality,
> however, I
> > do require that it take up the entire 9x11 page.
> They
> > may use colored pencil, markers, or both. This has
> > been a very successful lesson. They learn a little
> > about complimentary colors, analogous colors,
> > symmetrical & asymmetrical balance, and start to
> > become familiar with the elements & principles.
> It's
> > also a good beginning lesson because it helps me
> to
> > remember their names!
> > Terry
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: important concepts vs teaching for tests
> From: Marvin Bartel
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 14:52:48 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> Teaching for mass testing generally fails to teach
> the higher levels of mind formation and thinking.
> Education in America is seriously regressing unless
> schools teach for:
>
> 1. the ability to give multiple solutions to
> problems (like real life)
>
> 2. the ability to notice things that need to be
> noticed (needed to make the world a better place)
>
> 3. the ability to make choices where the rules have
> not yet been established and/or where rules are
> outdated and/or not fair (needed for justice in the
> world)
>
> 4. deal intelligently with situations for which
> there are no clear elements and principles (like
> much of life)
>
> 5. the ability to think divergently and consider
> opposite answers and unique answers (like those who
> solve the tough problems)
>
> 6. the ability to tolerate and appreciate diversity
> and the significant contributions realized when
> divergent points of view are brought to a problem
> (needed to keep the world from destroying itself)
>
> 7. the ability to add beauty and see ugliness (to
> make life worth living)
>
> and many other similar kinds of thinking that the
> tests are not now testing.
>
> Good art teaching can teach all of the above quite
> effectively.
>
> I wish we had good tests for these kind of things,
> but until we do, teaching for the tests only teaches
> some fairly standardized job skills, but not the
> kind of thinking and life skills that are needed to
> live in and sustain a free society that needs a
> responsible citizenry.
>
> Preparation for skillfully working in slavery and
> totalitarian societies is no longer satisfactory.
> According to economist, Richard Florida, at least 30
> percent of todays work force is employed in jobs
> that require high levels of creativity. People are
> not just using prior knowledge and skills, but they
> have to respond to unanticipated scenarios. All
> people use creativity in their personal lives.
>
> This is important for all levels of students. Many
> of the lower level students are dropping out of high
> school because of all the teaching for tests. In
> fact, schools have incentives to look the other way.
> The schools do better on the tests when these
> students drop out.
>
> Art education is better than teaching for limiting
> tests. Art teachers may need to make some gestures
> to keep jobs in the political situations they live
> in, but creative teachers can also do much more.
>
> Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D.
> www.bartelart.com
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE:Project for roll of film?
> From: "Judi Morgan"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 14:18:41 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> Hey all,
>
> I just discovered a roll of negatives that were
> supposed to be developed
> as slides. I hate to toss them. Any ideas for
> projects?
>
>
> Judi Morgan
> Saint George's School
> 2929 W. Waikiki Road
> Spokane, WA 99208
> 509.466.1636
> judi.morgan@sgs.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Marvin Bartel [mailto:marvinpb@goshen.edu]=20
> Sent: Wednesday, July 20, 2005 12:53 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] important concepts vs
> teaching for tests
>
> Teaching for mass testing generally fails to teach
> the higher levels of
> mind formation and thinking. Education in America is
> seriously
> regressing unless schools teach for:
>
> 1. the ability to give multiple solutions to
> problems (like real life)
> =20
> 2. the ability to notice things that need to be
> noticed (needed to make
> the world a better place)
>
> 3. the ability to make choices where the rules have
> not yet been
> established and/or where rules are outdated and/or
> not fair (needed for
> justice in the world)
>
> 4. deal intelligently with situations for which
> there are no clear
> elements and principles (like much of life)
>
> 5. the ability to think divergently and consider
> opposite answers and
> unique answers (like those who solve the tough
> problems)
>
> 6. the ability to tolerate and appreciate diversity
> and the significant
> contributions realized when divergent points of view
> are brought to a
> problem (needed to keep the world from destroying
> itself)
>
> 7. the ability to add beauty and see ugliness (to
> make life worth
> living)
>
> and many other similar kinds of thinking that the
> tests are not now
> testing.
>
> Good art teaching can teach all of the above quite
> effectively.
>
> I wish we had good tests for these kind of things,
> but until we do,
> teaching for the tests only teaches some fairly
> standardized job skills,
> but not the kind of thinking and life skills that
> are needed to live in
> and sustain a free society that needs a responsible
> citizenry. =20
>
> Preparation for skillfully working in slavery and
> totalitarian societies
> is no longer satisfactory. According to economist,
> Richard Florida, at
> least 30 percent of todays work force is employed in
> jobs that require
> high levels of creativity. People are not just using
> prior knowledge
> and skills, but they have to respond to
> unanticipated scenarios. All
> people use creativity in their personal lives.
>
> This is important for all levels of students. Many
> of the lower level
> students are dropping out of high school because of
> all the teaching for
> tests. In fact, schools have incentives to look the
> other way. The
> schools do better on the tests when these students
> drop out.=20
>
> Art education is better than teaching for limiting
> tests. Art teachers
> may need to make some gestures to keep jobs in the
> political situations
> they live in, but creative teachers can also do much
> more. =20
>
> Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D.=20
> www.bartelart.com
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to=20
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: still lifes all the same?
> From:
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:55:41 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> I've used 6 old cafeteria trays to set up still
> lifes. I lay a sheet of paper on the
> tray, arrange the items, trace each item on the
> paper to avoid arguments (this
> is in 5th grade where arguing is a sport). I have 6
> tables of students. Kids
> can rearrange themselves around the table, but
> cannot rearrange the stuff.
> Since the items' spots are traced, the correct
> position can be determined over
> the course of days. Jeannie in PA, k - 5
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Abstract or concrete
> From: "Diane C. Gregory"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:20:36 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> Interesting question Maggie,
>
> Like Pam, I intend to have my art education classes
> be an integration of theory
> and practice. This is my first year at Texas Woman's
> University, however, I
> have taught Art Education for 23 years. My students
> at TWU are excited about
> how we are integrating theory and practice in a
> student centered learning
> environment. We work in cooperative learning groups
> and students seem to
> understand how what they are doing in class will
> help them be successful
> practicing teachers. I am not so confident, but then
> again I am a
> perfectionist and want to do more to help them
> succeed. I guess I won't know
> for sure until I have an opportunity to talk with
> them once they begin
> teaching.
>
> I have always thought of undergraduate art education
> programs as places where we
> begin the life long process of preparing art
> teachers. It is a journey and we
> begin and we get as far as we can. Hopefully we get
> far enough along for
> people to enjoy some success. I talk about a life
> long commitment and journey
> with them and remind them we are life long partners
> in figuring out how best to
> teach and learn. I don't have all the answers and I
> continue to learn. We are
> works in progress. :-)
> --
> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> Studies in Art Education
> Texas Woman's University
> Denton, TX 76204
> dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> 940-898-2540
>
>
> Quoting Pam
> :
>
> > Hi, Maggie:
> >
> > >>I have been reading this exchange with interest.
> Pam and Diane, I view
> > your role as challengers of the norm, asking us to
> think before we do.
> > That being said, I wonder how you would, if only
> being given 4 1/2
> > weeks--or 9 weeks-- with your pre-service art
> education students--what
> > would you teach? The abstract or the concrete?<<
> >
> > First let me say that I taught at the elementary
> level for 11 years and then
> > spent another four as a mentor for TETAC. I know
> the challenges of seeing
> > kids only a few moments each week or every other
> week or whatever. The last
> > elementary where I taught had the additional
> challenge of being a United
> > Nations sort of place with about 23 cultures and
> 50 plus languages at any
> > given time.
> >
> > Now, let me explain how my pre-service courses are
> set up. I have a
> > learner-centered, problem-based program wherein
> students identify a problem
> > to solve and they solve it during the course of
> the semester. So, from that
> > standpoint, I deal with the abstract to the
> concrete. In addition to this,
> > there is a continual thread through the semester
> that requires reading and
> > discussion of text.
> >
> > In my own college experience I found too much
> theory and not enough
> > practical application. My students get a balance.
> I expect them to
> > demonstrate knowledge through application.
> Pencil/paper tests are not my
> > mode of evaluating what student know. They have to
> demonstrate knowledge
> > through application.
> >
> > To answer your question, abstract or concrete, I
> couldn't pick one or the
> > other. My teaching is a blend. Both are important
> to learning and to the
> > development of quality art teachers.
> >
> > Pam
> >
> >
> ____________________________________________________
> > Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the
> French Riviera
> > Space is limited --- E-mail this address for
> details
> >
> ____________________________________________________
> > For art teaching resources, professional
> development, & travel, visit:
> > www.ArtResourcesforTeachers.com
> >
> ____________________________________________________
> > For information about the NAU art education
> program:
> > Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> > Northern Arizona University
> > Art Education
> > P.O. Box 6020
> > Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> > 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> > Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> > http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: important concepts vs teaching for
> tests
> From: "Diane C. Gregory"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:31:41 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> Good points Marvin.
>
> I don't worry so much about those tests. Wise people
> know that these tests
> don't reflect what is taught or learned. Wise
> teachers view them as a nuisance
> and do what they are told, yet figure out a way to
> teach for the test while
> teaching effectively. It is a shame we have this
> little game going on. But
> the same thing goes on in business. It is just
> surface stuff. It is a game.
> I usually blow it off so I don't get so mad.
>
> The testing movement is not about measuring
> learning; it is about politicians
> trying to create an impression that learning is
> taking place.
>
> Those individuals who value tests think of learning
> as a product rather than a
> process. We will just have to hope that they will
> understand at some point.
> Nevertheless, I do leave room to be shown that I
> need to change my own thinking
> about this viewpoint. I know I don't have the truth.
> I value the search for it
> though. :-) I think I have more questions than
> answers. I hope I can get to the
> point when I can figure out the right questions to
> ask.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Diane
> --
> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> Studies in Art Education
> Texas Woman's University
> Denton, TX 76204
> dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> 940-898-2540
>
>
> Quoting Marvin Bartel :
>
> > Teaching for mass testing generally fails to teach
> the higher levels of mind
> > formation and thinking. Education in America is
> seriously regressing unless
> > schools teach for:
> >
> > 1. the ability to give multiple solutions to
> problems (like real life)
> >
> > 2. the ability to notice things that need to be
> noticed (needed to make the
> > world a better place)
> >
> > 3. the ability to make choices where the rules
> have not yet been established
> > and/or where rules are outdated and/or not fair
> (needed for justice in the
> > world)
> >
> > 4. deal intelligently with situations for which
> there are no clear elements
> > and principles (like much of life)
> >
> > 5. the ability to think divergently and consider
> opposite answers and unique
> > answers (like those who solve the tough problems)
> >
> > 6. the ability to tolerate and appreciate
> diversity and the significant
> > contributions realized when divergent points of
> view are brought to a problem
> > (needed to keep the world from destroying itself)
> >
> > 7. the ability to add beauty and see ugliness (to
> make life worth living)
> >
> > and many other similar kinds of thinking that the
> tests are not now testing.
> >
> > Good art teaching can teach all of the above quite
> effectively.
> >
> > I wish we had good tests for these kind of things,
> but until we do, teaching
> > for the tests only teaches some fairly
> standardized job skills, but not the
> > kind of thinking and life skills that are needed
> to live in and sustain a
> > free society that needs a responsible citizenry.
> >
> > Preparation for skillfully working in slavery and
> totalitarian societies is
> > no longer satisfactory. According to economist,
> Richard Florida, at least 30
> > percent of todays work force is employed in jobs
> that require high levels of
> > creativity. People are not just using prior
> knowledge and skills, but they
> > have to respond to unanticipated scenarios. All
> people use creativity in
> > their personal lives.
> >
> > This is important for all levels of students. Many
> of the lower level
> > students are dropping out of high school because
> of all the teaching for
> > tests. In fact, schools have incentives to look
> the other way. The schools
> > do better on the tests when these students drop
> out.
> >
> > Art education is better than teaching for limiting
> tests. Art teachers may
> > need to make some gestures to keep jobs in the
> political situations they live
> > in, but creative teachers can also do much more.
> >
> > Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D.
> > www.bartelart.com
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re:middle school lessons
> From: "Diane C. Gregory"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:37:49 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 20
>
> Terry,
> Are you able to help your students find places
> within the community to create
> graffitti art? By the way, what is the difference
> between mural art in a
> public place and graffitti art?
>
> Diane
>
>
>
> Quoting Terry Marney :
>
> > Vicki, this year my 7th & 8th graders started the
> > semester with "Graffiti Art". We talked about the
> > difference between art & vandalism, to begin with
> and
> > we look at a few samples of very talented graffiti
> > artists. I have students come up with 3 different
> > ideas for a design and before they begin their
> final
> > one, I go over one-point perspective. They
> practice
> > doing their name in block letters, going back in
> space
> > in one-point perspective. Then, if they choose to
> use
> > that in their final artwork, they may. I give them
> a
> > lot of freedom of choice in this one because their
> > graffiti should reflect their personality,
> however, I
> > do require that it take up the entire 9x11 page.
> They
> > may use colored pencil, markers, or both. This has
> > been a very successful lesson. They learn a little
> > about complimentary colors, analogous colors,
> > symmetrical & asymmetrical balance, and start to
> > become familiar with the elements & principles.
> It's
> > also a good beginning lesson because it helps me
> to
> > remember their names!
> > Terry
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Re:middle school lessons
> From: Laurie Reber
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 17:25:36 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 21
>
> To piggyback off the graffiti lesson. I had my
> students do the same type of project at the end of
> the
> school year. Rather than doing their name, I had
> them
> plan a tribute to the teacher who they felt impacted
> them the most during their two years in junior high
> school. They planned their sketches and then had
> them
> approved by me for "appropriateness" (you know how
> junior high schoolers can sometimes be - lol!). I
> then
> had the students take their sketches and a box of
> colored chalk and we "graffiti'd" the outside brick
> walls behind the art classroom at school. I then
> sent
> an invitation to those teachers who were tributed so
> that they could come and view their tribute wall.
> The
> students loved the idea of the tribute AND the idea
> of
> being able to "approporiately graffiti" the school
> walls. The teachers loved the kudos - many were
> surprised as to who had tributed them - it was a
> positive way to end the school year.
>
> --- "M. Austin" wrote:
>
> > This sounds interesting, but I'm having trouble
> > visualizing the final
> > graffiti connection. Do you have images you could
> > share?
> > ~Michal
> > K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> > http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> >
> >
> > > Vicki, this year my 7th & 8th graders started
> the
> > > semester with "Graffiti Art". We talked about
> the
> > > difference between art & vandalism, to begin
> with
> > and
> > > we look at a few samples of very talented
> graffiti
> > > artists. I have students come up with 3
> different
> > > ideas for a design and before they begin their
> > final
> > > one, I go over one-point perspective. They
> > practice
> > > doing their name in block letters, going back in
> > space
> > > in one-point perspective. Then, if they choose
> to
> > use
> > > that in their final artwork, they may. I give
> > them a
> > > lot of freedom of choice in this one because
> their
> > > graffiti should reflect their personality,
> > however, I
> > > do require that it take up the entire 9x11 page.
>
> > They
> > > may use colored pencil, markers, or both. This
> > has
> > > been a very successful lesson. They learn a
> > little
> > > about complimentary colors, analogous colors,
> > > symmetrical & asymmetrical balance, and start to
> > > become familiar with the elements & principles.
> > It's
> > > also a good beginning lesson because it helps me
> > to
> > > remember their names!
> > > Terry
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
> http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Important concepts
> From: "Pam"
>
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 18:20:56 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 22
>
> For those of you contemplating some of the ideas
> that have been tossed out
> to the group as of late, may I suggest that you read
> a bit of Eisner in
> regard to what he calls the null curriculum? A quick
> Google search and Yahoo
> search under Eisner Null Curriculum brought up quite
> a few articles. This is
> one. http://www.teachersmind.com/eisner.htm
>
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the
> French Riviera
> Space is limited --- E-mail this address for details
> ____________________________________________________
> For art teaching resources, professional
> development, & travel, visit:
> www.ArtResourcesforTeachers.com
> ____________________________________________________
> For information about the NAU art education program:
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: still-life drawing
> From: "Holmgren"
> Date: Wed, 20 Jul 2005 22:22:10 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 23
>
> When I do still life, I set up two still-life
> arrangements on a table in the
> center of the room, then also set up still-life
> arrangements on at least two
> moveable carts. Students can choose the arrangment
> they want to draw--and
> the view they wish to use. I work with elementary
> students, but think this
> could work for high school, as well.
>
> Mary H.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "@home"
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
>
> Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2005 11:41 AM
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] still-life drawing
>
>
> > Question for the group:
> > After teaching basic drawing techniques and
> assigning projects of a
> > smaller nature, I conclude with a more complex
> still-life assignment (this
> > is h.s. level). How many of you set up more than
> one still-life in order
> > to
> > give students a choice? I know that space is
> sometimes limited, but I
> > don't
> > care to see so many final drawings that look so
> much alike. I suppose one
> > could set up a still-life on a moveable cart and
> have the students sit all
> > around it for a different perspective. Any other
> suggestions???
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> as: hollyatwerk@yahoo.com
> leave-teacherartexchange-46951N@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
>
>
> Holly
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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 Holly
 
   

                
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