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Re: [teacherartexchange] Elliot Eisner on choice

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From: Diane C. Gregory (dianegregory_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Jul 19 2005 - 19:52:30 PDT


Vicky,

Thinking again on this topic--Another ingredient in learning is warm,
supportive, and stimulating relationships with a mentoring teacher and other
students. Plenty of opportunities for real world activities that make a
difference in the real world. Intensity of experience is also another
ingredient for learning.

Hope this helps.

Diane

--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
Studies in Art Education
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX  76204
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
940-898-2540
Quoting "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>:
> Vicky,
>
> Who sets the standards and who determines what the essential knowledge is?
> Setting standards sounds like some external authority that determines what is
> important for you or others.  Essential knowledge sounds like someone who
> thinks they know what that is.  Standards and essential knowledge are
> important.  I would support setting ones own standards and essential
> knowledge.
>  Frankly I would be most interested in what students can do.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Diane
> --
> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> Studies in Art Education
> Texas Woman's University
> Denton, TX  76204
> dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> 940-898-2540
>
>
> Quoting vranck0602@aol.com:
>
> > Hello Kathy and all,
> > I've been sitting in a differentiation conference the last couple of
> > days and it seems that giving choices alone is not quite enough. It
> > seems that we must structure and weight these choices so that specific
> > standards are met and essential knowledge is gained.  Anyone have
> > thoughts on this?
> > Vicki
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: twoducks@aol.com
> > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > Sent: Tue, 19 Jul 2005 18:45:08 -0400
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] Elliot Eisner on choice
> >
> >     Today my paper mailbox contained the keynote speeches from the last
> > three NAEA national conferences. I am happy to have these. I sat in the
> > enormous audience for Elliot Eisner's speech in Boston and there was
> > more than one statement that made me smile...but I took no notes. So
> > here is one good nugget.
> >
> >   "Gifted art teachers provide models and aims of practice that other
> > fields would be wise to emulate. What are the cognitive processes that
> > the arts develop? ...One is that it helps youngsters learn how to make
> > judgments in the absence of rules. When youngsters are choosing, making
> > choices, making decisions and making a painting or a sculpture or
> > whatever it is they're working on, but there is no recipe that they
> > have to follow in order to make those choices. They need to engage in
> > their experience, their bodily experiences, with the images in order to
> > make the choices that will enhance the work. So making judgments in the
> > absence of rules is something that the arts makes possible...and what
> > you see at the end is the result of the choices that they've made."
> >  (National Art Education Association, page 66)
> >  Any comments?
> >  kathy douglas
> >
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