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RE: [teacherartexchange] important concepts to teach kids

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From: Diane C. Gregory (dianegregory_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Jul 19 2005 - 16:46:23 PDT


Hi Ken and all,

When do students possess the skills to tackle Who am I problems? I respectfully
disagree, that we need to focus on concepts/skills first, Ken. Searching and
problem solving ways to use the media, art concepts to answer profound
questions simultaneously is exactly the value of art and it is essential that
we integrate all of this together. If we wait until we think they can answer
the big questions, they will have forgotten the questions they had. We must
integrate learning. We must integrate concepts, skills, with big questions.
The process is as important as the product. In many cases the process is the
product. As students mature their skills and concepts will develop, but the
questions will become more complex. After living 70 or 80 years skills,
concepts and big questions come together. The Japanese refer to this as
Satori.

The recent talk about Eisner on the list reminds me of something he said, "We
can teach children how to read and write, but if they have nothing important to
say, what good is it?"

Thoughts?

--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
Studies in Art Education
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX  76204
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
940-898-2540
Quoting "bicyclken@earthlink.net" <bicyclken@earthlink.net>:
> Before the students can play with concepts and Who am I problems, it helps
> to give them the tools of art.  The Elements and Principles of Design are a
> good begining as to help them structure their responses and organize the
> format.  The media that you introduce will help them feel comfortable
> creating their compositions using the different media, both in color and
> black and white.  Now with these concepts and materials explained, they are
> better at responding to a concept in art and explaining themselves because
> they are not learning everything at once.
>
> Ken Schwab
>
> bicyclken@earthlink.net
> http://room3art.com
>
>
> > [Original Message]
> > From: Jennifer Sabo <jsabo@kidspacemuseum.org>
> > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > Date: 7/19/2005 10:03:14 AM
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] important concepts to teach kids
> >
> >
> > Hi all,
> >
> > I am in charge of creating all art programming for a children's museum
> and am working on reviewing and reevaluating our programs.  Currently our
> programs consist of more "messy play" that allows children to experiment
> with materials but doesn't go into art concepts or artists.
> >
> > I would like to include art concepts and artists into our programs. The
> current discussion on the top ten images has helped me in selecting artists
> to introduce but now I'd like to know your top ten concepts (line, color,
> etc) you feel children should be exposed to. The children we serve are
> generally 4-10.  Please keep in mind that these programs are open and
> children are free to come and go as they like.
> >
> > Thank you for all your ideas.
> >
> > Jennifer
> >
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