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Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In Art Assignments

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From: david gran (dsgran_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Jul 02 2005 - 06:45:29 PDT


Well, although controversial in their own times,
Lincoln and Kennedy have both been cannonized as great
leaders by history (and rightly so). Bush is a
controversial president (his approval rating is
currently in the 40s) and aside from my personal
opinion of him, history has yet to judge him. I don't
know that forcing the students to draw anything that
they hate is going to be productive, whether its Bush,
Clinton, or Michael Jackson. Lets say they are
"programmed" to hate him, I don't think you're going
to reverse that programming by forcing them to draw
him; in fact you might find some of that resentment
transferred onto you.

--- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:

> This is sort of related. I taught some middle
> school
> classes a lesson in upside down drawing (as
> presented
> in the book "Drawing on the Right Side of the
> Brain").
> For the assignment I created a transparency to
> place
> on the overhead projector upside down. The students
> would then drawing the image on their paper, being
> forced to think about line and shape instead of
> specific facial features.
>
> For the image I could have used a cartoon character,
> a
> musician, an actor or actress, or an athlete, but I
> chose to use a photo of President Bush.
>
> I had a lot of students complaining about having to
> draw Bush, saying they hated him and other
> disrepectful remarks. This was just a few weeks
> after
> the 2004 election and some asked why they couldn't
> draw John Kerry instead. I had to remind them that
> John Kerry was not the President of the United
> States.
>
> These students were apparently programmed by their
> families or the media to hate President Bush with an
> absolute passion. They spoke about him as if he
> were
> some inhuman demon.
>
> All politics aside, I think the students should have
> more respect for our leaders. I would repeat this
> same assignment using the current U.S. president no
> matter who was in office and how I voted. When I
> was
> in school the teacher used images of former
> presidents
> such as Lincoln and Kennedy, but I prefer using the
> current one.
>
> --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Sure, and all students will find some reason to
> feel
> > marginalized (they'll even cling to those reasons
> as
> > teens) but I'm sure that as teachers, we can all
> > agree
> > that we'd want to minimalize that marginalization
> as
> > much as possible. That's all I'm saying.
> >
> > --- "@home" <felsecker@insightbb.com> wrote:
> >
> > > ...and I grew up a Christian in a mostly Jewish
> > > neighborhood until I went to
> > > college....and felt "marginalized" from
> > kindergarten
> > > through high
> > > school....but, we are enriched by the experience
> > and
> > > learn about different
> > > religions, cultures and customs and....life goes
> > > on.......PEACE!
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "david gran" <dsgran@yahoo.com>
> > > To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> > > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > > Sent: Saturday, July 02, 2005 12:02 AM
> > > Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In
> > Art
> > > Assignments
> > >
> > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Believe me, I understand why an egg, a tree,
> the
> > > > springtime, flowers, etc. are symbols of
> > rebirth.
> > > I
> > > > understand that flowers and colorful things
> are
> > > fun
> > > > things for children to paint, and help get a
> > > better
> > > > understanding of color theory, and I can see
> why
> > > > "rebirth" would be an interesting springtime
> > > lesson.
> > > > However, I'd still be cautious about the
> > > connections I
> > > > was making. Eggs and bunnies may have their
> > > origins
> > > > in the pagan tradition, but they have been
> > wholly
> > > > appropriated by the christian holiday. The
> > > > appropriatness of involving this in a lesson
> I'm
> > > sure
> > > > depends on your population, but as a Jewish
> kid
> > > who
> > > > grew up in a mostly christian neighborhood,
> > > thinking
> > > > "this project is actually based in ancient
> pagan
> > > > ritual" probably wouldn't have made me feel
> any
> > > less
> > > > marginalized.
> > > >
> > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > "Sure, its not the subject matter, per se,
> > > > > springtime
> > > > > is my favorite time of year and flowers are
> > > always
> > > > > nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How
> > would
> > > you
> > > > > address that conceptually, or rather, how
> > would
> > > you
> > > > > expect it to come through in their artwork?"
> > > > >
> > > > > Springtime itself is a period of rebirth.
> Any
> > > > > assignments that involve elements of spring
> > also
> > > > > involve elements of rebirth. I'm just
> > > suggesting
> > > > > that
> > > > > you could tie an activity into spring in
> > general
> > > > > instead of specifically Easter.
> > > > >
> > > > > Easter eggs and bunnies are Pagan symbols
> that
> > > have
> > > > > nothing to do with the christian celebration
> > of
> > > > > Easter, but all of these symbols do promote
> > the
> > > idea
> > > > > of rebirth.
> > > > >
> > > > > Those art pieces which show an outside view
> of
> > a
> > > > > tree
> > > > > which one image for each season demonstrate
> > the
> > > > > concept of rebirth. In the spring the tree
> > gets
> > > new
> > > > > leaves, the leaves are plentiful in the
> > summer,
> > > the
> > > > > leaves come off in the fall, in the winter
> the
> > > tree
> > > > > is
> > > > > leaveless and covered in ice and snow, then
> in
> > > the
> > > > > spring the cycle starts over.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Sure, its not the subject matter, per se,
> > > > > springtime
> > > > > > is my favorite time of year and flowers
> are
> > > always
> > > > > > nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How
> > > would
> > > > > you
> > > > > > address that conceptually, or rather, how
> > > would
> > > > > you
> > > > > > expect it to come through in their
> artwork?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I'm sorry if this sounds arguementative,
> I'm
> > > just
> > > > > > trying to understand this from your point
> of
> > > view.
> > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>
> > wrote:
> > > > > >
>
=== message truncated ===

http://carrotrevolution.blogspot.com/

The day is coming when an ordinary carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.

-Paul Cezanne

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