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Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In Art Assignments

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From: david gran (dsgran_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jul 01 2005 - 22:02:22 PDT


 

Believe me, I understand why an egg, a tree, the
springtime, flowers, etc. are symbols of rebirth. I
understand that flowers and colorful things are fun
things for children to paint, and help get a better
understanding of color theory, and I can see why
"rebirth" would be an interesting springtime lesson.
However, I'd still be cautious about the connections I
was making. Eggs and bunnies may have their origins
in the pagan tradition, but they have been wholly
appropriated by the christian holiday. The
appropriatness of involving this in a lesson I'm sure
depends on your population, but as a Jewish kid who
grew up in a mostly christian neighborhood, thinking
"this project is actually based in ancient pagan
ritual" probably wouldn't have made me feel any less
marginalized.

--- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:

> "Sure, its not the subject matter, per se,
> springtime
> is my favorite time of year and flowers are always
> nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How would you
> address that conceptually, or rather, how would you
> expect it to come through in their artwork?"
>
> Springtime itself is a period of rebirth. Any
> assignments that involve elements of spring also
> involve elements of rebirth. I'm just suggesting
> that
> you could tie an activity into spring in general
> instead of specifically Easter.
>
> Easter eggs and bunnies are Pagan symbols that have
> nothing to do with the Christian celebration of
> Easter, but all of these symbols do promote the idea
> of rebirth.
>
> Those art pieces which show an outside view of a
> tree
> which one image for each season demonstrate the
> concept of rebirth. In the spring the tree gets new
> leaves, the leaves are plentiful in the summer, the
> leaves come off in the fall, in the winter the tree
> is
> leaveless and covered in ice and snow, then in the
> spring the cycle starts over.
>
>
> --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Sure, its not the subject matter, per se,
> springtime
> > is my favorite time of year and flowers are always
> > nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How would
> you
> > address that conceptually, or rather, how would
> you
> > expect it to come through in their artwork?
> >
> > I'm sorry if this sounds arguementative, I'm just
> > trying to understand this from your point of view.
>
> >
> > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Spring flowers and butterflies are essentially
> > > symbols
> > > of rebirth since they are bright and colorful
> > signs
> > > of
> > > a new season that follows winter where many
> > flowers
> > > and animals die. I'm sure you could come up
> with
> > > some
> > > lessons involving flowers or butterflies without
> > > ever
> > > having to mention Jesus.
> > >
> > >
> > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > >
> > > > I understand your point, but regardless of its
> > > > origins, the Easter Holiday is entirely a
> major
> > > part
> > > > of the Christian religion. I 'd be hard
> pressed
> > to
> > > > come up with a lesson about 'rebirth',
> > especially
> > > > around Easter, that didn't take on a religious
> > > > significance.
> > > >
> > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Rebirth around Easter is symbolic of the
> > spring
> > > > > coming
> > > > > after winter. After a long period of
> "death"
> > > when
> > > > > flowers and plants are dead or covered with
> > > snow,
> > > > > they
> > > > > then awaken in the spring with blooming
> > flowers
> > > > and
> > > > > leaves on the trees. Also spring usually
> > > involves
> > > > > the
> > > > > birth of various animals who were
> hibernating
> > > > > through
> > > > > the winter months. Christianity and the
> > > > > resurrection
> > > > > of Christ does tie into that, but the spring
> > and
> > > > > Easter celebrations of rebirth predate the
> > birth
> > > > of
> > > > > Christ by hundreds of years.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > Themes of peace are good anytime of year,
> > not
> > > > just
> > > > > > at
> > > > > > Christmas. However, themes of rebirth
> > around
> > > > > easter
> > > > > > will likely feel a bit marginalizing to
> your
> > > > > > non-christian students.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>
> > wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > The holidays are part of our culture,
> but
> > > art
> > > > > > > projects
> > > > > > > depicting seasonal elements associated
> > with
> > > > > > holidays
> > > > > > > (Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, etc.) then
> > > become
> > > > > > > essential holiday decorations and are
> not
> > > > > > something
> > > > > > > that would be displayed throughout the
> > year.
> > >
> > > > > Most
> > > > > > > of
> > > > > > > us view Christmas as an important part
> of
> > > our
> > > > > > > culture,
> > > > > > > but I doubt any of us have paintings of
> > > Santa
> > > > > > Claus
> > > > > > > up
> > > > > > > year around.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > You can use those holidays as
> springboards
> > > to
> > > > > art
> > > > > > > that
> > > > > > > uses the concepts of celebrations to
> > create
> > > > > > artwork
> > > > > > > that would not seem seasonal. For
> > example,
> > > a
> > > > > work
> > > > > > > involving the concept of peace for
> > > Christmas,
> > > > a
> > > > > > > nightmare/fear for Halloween, love for
> > > > > Valentine's
> > > > > > > Day, rebirth for Easter, freedom for
> Black
> > > > > History
> > > > > > > Month, etc. For St. Patrick's Day you
> > could
> > > > > have
> > > > > > > them
> > > > > > > do a monochromatic painting using only
> > > green,
> > > > > > black,
> > > > > > > and white to depict whatever subject
> > matter
> > > > they
> > > > > > > choose.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > --- "Diane C. Gregory"
> > > > > > <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> > > > > > > wrote:
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Interesting discussion on creativity.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > What about looking at seasonal or
> > holiday
> > > > > > objects
> > > > > > > as
> > > > > > > > artifacts of culture. I do
> > > > > > > > know that in the past, art educators
> > have
> > > > > > usually
> > > > > > > > thought of holiday art as
> > > > > > > > trivial and trite, without much merit.
>
>
=== message truncated ===

http://carrotrevolution.blogspot.com/

The day is coming when an ordinary carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution.

-Paul Cezanne

                
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