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Re: [teacherartexchange] Creativity In Art Assignments

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From: Darren High (darren_high_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Jul 01 2005 - 20:48:40 PDT


"Sure, its not the subject matter, per se, springtime
is my favorite time of year and flowers are always
nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How would you
address that conceptually, or rather, how would you
expect it to come through in their artwork?"

Springtime itself is a period of rebirth. Any
assignments that involve elements of spring also
involve elements of rebirth. I'm just suggesting that
you could tie an activity into spring in general
instead of specifically Easter.

Easter eggs and bunnies are Pagan symbols that have
nothing to do with the Christian celebration of
Easter, but all of these symbols do promote the idea
of rebirth.

Those art pieces which show an outside view of a tree
which one image for each season demonstrate the
concept of rebirth. In the spring the tree gets new
leaves, the leaves are plentiful in the summer, the
leaves come off in the fall, in the winter the tree is
leaveless and covered in ice and snow, then in the
spring the cycle starts over.

--- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Sure, its not the subject matter, per se, springtime
> is my favorite time of year and flowers are always
> nice - its the concept of "rebirth". How would you
> address that conceptually, or rather, how would you
> expect it to come through in their artwork?
>
> I'm sorry if this sounds arguementative, I'm just
> trying to understand this from your point of view.
>
> --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Spring flowers and butterflies are essentially
> > symbols
> > of rebirth since they are bright and colorful
> signs
> > of
> > a new season that follows winter where many
> flowers
> > and animals die. I'm sure you could come up with
> > some
> > lessons involving flowers or butterflies without
> > ever
> > having to mention Jesus.
> >
> >
> > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > I understand your point, but regardless of its
> > > origins, the Easter Holiday is entirely a major
> > part
> > > of the Christian religion. I 'd be hard pressed
> to
> > > come up with a lesson about 'rebirth',
> especially
> > > around Easter, that didn't take on a religious
> > > significance.
> > >
> > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Rebirth around Easter is symbolic of the
> spring
> > > > coming
> > > > after winter. After a long period of "death"
> > when
> > > > flowers and plants are dead or covered with
> > snow,
> > > > they
> > > > then awaken in the spring with blooming
> flowers
> > > and
> > > > leaves on the trees. Also spring usually
> > involves
> > > > the
> > > > birth of various animals who were hibernating
> > > > through
> > > > the winter months. Christianity and the
> > > > resurrection
> > > > of Christ does tie into that, but the spring
> and
> > > > Easter celebrations of rebirth predate the
> birth
> > > of
> > > > Christ by hundreds of years.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > --- david gran <dsgran@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Themes of peace are good anytime of year,
> not
> > > just
> > > > > at
> > > > > Christmas. However, themes of rebirth
> around
> > > > easter
> > > > > will likely feel a bit marginalizing to your
> > > > > non-christian students.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > --- Darren High <darren_high@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > The holidays are part of our culture, but
> > art
> > > > > > projects
> > > > > > depicting seasonal elements associated
> with
> > > > > holidays
> > > > > > (Santa Claus, Easter Bunny, etc.) then
> > become
> > > > > > essential holiday decorations and are not
> > > > > something
> > > > > > that would be displayed throughout the
> year.
> >
> > > > Most
> > > > > > of
> > > > > > us view Christmas as an important part of
> > our
> > > > > > culture,
> > > > > > but I doubt any of us have paintings of
> > Santa
> > > > > Claus
> > > > > > up
> > > > > > year around.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > You can use those holidays as springboards
> > to
> > > > art
> > > > > > that
> > > > > > uses the concepts of celebrations to
> create
> > > > > artwork
> > > > > > that would not seem seasonal. For
> example,
> > a
> > > > work
> > > > > > involving the concept of peace for
> > Christmas,
> > > a
> > > > > > nightmare/fear for Halloween, love for
> > > > Valentine's
> > > > > > Day, rebirth for Easter, freedom for Black
> > > > History
> > > > > > Month, etc. For St. Patrick's Day you
> could
> > > > have
> > > > > > them
> > > > > > do a monochromatic painting using only
> > green,
> > > > > black,
> > > > > > and white to depict whatever subject
> matter
> > > they
> > > > > > choose.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > --- "Diane C. Gregory"
> > > > > <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> > > > > > wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > Interesting discussion on creativity.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > What about looking at seasonal or
> holiday
> > > > > objects
> > > > > > as
> > > > > > > artifacts of culture. I do
> > > > > > > know that in the past, art educators
> have
> > > > > usually
> > > > > > > thought of holiday art as
> > > > > > > trivial and trite, without much merit.
> > > > However,
> > > > > > in
> > > > > > > more recent times, some
> > > > > > > have advocated looking at holidays as
> > > examples
> > > > > of
> > > > > > > tradition, celebration, which
> > > > > > > have an important place in the lives of
> > > > > children.
> > > > > > > Laura Chapman in her book
> > > > > > > Approaches to Art in Education advocated
> > > > looking
> > > > > > at
> > > > > > > holidays, traditions and
> > > > > > > celebrations as a way to look at art and
> > > > > culture.
> > > > > > > Maybe we have been
> > > > > > > overlooking an important opportunity to
> > > > > understand
> > > > > > > our own culture and the
> > > > > > > culture of others. Taking a value
> > > pluralistic
> > > > > > > stance, might be appropriate
> > > > > > > when looking at cultural artifacts. The
> > > > entire
> > > > > > > discussion really centers
> > > > > > > around what the purpose of an education
> in
> > > art
> > > > > is.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > It seems there are
> > > > > > > differing assumptions about what that is
> > or
> > > > what
> > > > > > > that entails. It is
> > > > > > > fascinating to watch the changes unfold
> > over
> > > > > time.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Diane
> > > > > > > --
> > > > > > > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> > > > > > > Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> > > > > > > Studies in Art Education
> > > > > > > Texas Woman's University
> > > > > > > Denton, TX 76204
>
=== message truncated ===

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