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Re: drawing bicycles...or standing upside down

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Jul 24 2002 - 10:51:44 PDT


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
Danville, CA 94526
http://www.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/newKramer/KramerMain.html
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>From: Woody Duncan <wduncan@kc.rr.com>
>> This leads me to something I've always wanted to try. Have one student lie
>> down on the table and have another student stand at the first student's
>> head upside down and draw his portrait. What do you think? Think is would
>> be a better portrait? Ha. >> Toodles....Bunki ---

> Bunki,
> Clarify, ( "have another student stand at the first student's
> head upside down" ) Standing upside down is a rather difficult position
> to draw from. Sounds interesting, I'll try it for the next evaluation.
> Woody in KC
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Yep, you got it. Everybody stands upside down and draws. It takes some
coordination on the student's part (there's always one or two who can't do
it). This re-enforces the "brain-scramble" so everyone goes from left-brain
to right-brain syndrome. It makes it essential for the teacher to illustrate
left-brain activities AND explain how to draw easier. I read it somewhere.
Toodles...Bunki

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