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RE: Art & Intellectual Property

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From: Kimberly Herbert (kimberly_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Jul 10 2001 - 19:34:54 PDT


Chris – I’m a GT teacher not an Art Teacher so I hope you don’t mind me
responding.

2) Legal concerns of intellectual properties: For teachers? Students? 
How can an instructor use copyrighted material on a class website or
school newsletter?  How do you go about getting permission?  Are there
ways to use the info w/out permission?

Teachers can use copyrighted material in a limited way under fair use
for educational purposes. When I use images or information from a
source, I cite the source. I don’t know that a website or newsletter
falls under fair use. Often if you e-mail the web master he/she will
respond pretty quickly.
 
3) What concerns are there with the use of print sources in relation to
copying or duplication, and classroom use?  Is there a "fair use" policy
at your school?  What about electronic sources?

Copying print sources – I don’t have a problem if you are using a couple
of pages of something and you want each student to have a copy, but
photocopying large amounts of material not only is a possible violation
of copyright, it doesn’t make economic sense it would probably cost less
to buy the books. Again with electronic sources – I would love each
child in my class to have a computer mounted under his/her desk so that
we could look at an electronic source the same way we do books. (better
yet replace bulky textbooks with their errors (especially Social Studies
texts) with CDROMS or DVDs a boon for Science classes – have video
showing concepts as well as text) and Social Studies (links to primary
documents – letters, legal documents, art and recording (audio and
visual) instead of third hand watered down facts) What I have (or will
have) is 1 computer hooked to an overhead TV. I will preview material if
it is too difficult to see, then either we will use the lab or I’ll have
to print it.
 
4) (I know this is a pretty open-ended question...)  What value do you
place upon "Intellectual property"? economic, aesthetic, cultural,
historical, personal, spiritual...?
I value “Intellectual Property” very highly. What can be more important
than the thoughts of a person? Everything we do and create comes from
our thoughts. We can do so much with technology – that honest people are
turning into thieves without knowing what they are doing.

For example my former co-workers at the museum wanted me to take digital
pictures of the ceramics collection, so we could print postcards to sell
in the gift shop. They understood that Joe Citizen could not come in and
take pictures of any exhibit – because they might do the same thing. But
couldn’t understand why we couldn’t since “we” owned the artwork.
Finally I go sick of arguing with them over it. We were standing in the
development assistant’s office. I picked up one of the CD’s she kept at
her desk. “Do you own this?” “Yes” “Can you sell it to Gracie?” “Yes”
“Can you take it to a recording studio, make copies, and sell them in
the gift shop” CLICK “No, I get it we own the piece but not the image”
New subject how do we get permission from the artists to make the
postcards?

Plagiarism is becoming more and more common on university campuses.
People are remaking and redistributing movies like Titanic (cutting out
nudity) and Star Wars Episode I (deleting a character they didn’t like)
with out the permission of the owners of the material. I find it
amazing the people did not understand the difference between making a
tape or CD mix for your own use in the Car and Millions of people
downloading songs on Napster. Yes there were artists that got a start
because of “word of Mouth” on Napster, but the artists should have a
choice of participating or not.

I think all teachers need to think of the example we are setting in
using other people’s property and use it with the same respect we would
expect our property to be used.

Kimberly (kimberly@wcc.net)

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Allred [mailto:callred@asheboro.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 10, 2001 11:44 AM
To: ArtsEdNet Talk
Subject: Art & Intellectual Property

Hi folks.  This is Chris Allred.  I am currently working on a research
project concerning ideas about the copying, quotation, or use of other
artist's images.  I have a few basic questions to cover and am wondering
if anyone would care to contribute...  Feel free to send any comments,
suggestions, opinions, weblinks, or important artists relevant to the
topic.  You can respond to all of the topics, a single topic, or any
number in between.  (Please include your name, so I can give you proper
citing.)  You folks have been a GREAT help to my work this summer. 
Thank you all in advance!  
***Here they go:
1) Is there a history of copying or quotation as a studio practice in
the history of art?  Examples?
 2) Legal concerns of intellectual properties: For teachers? Students? 
How can an instructor use copyrighted material on a class website or
school newsletter?  How do you go about getting permission?  Are there
ways to use the info w/out permission?
 
3) What concerns are there with the use of print sources in relation to
copying or duplication, and classroom use?  Is there a "fair use" policy
at your school?  What about electronic sources?
 
4) (I know this is a pretty open-ended question...)  What value do you
place upon "Intellectual property"? economic, aesthetic, cultural,
historical, personal, spiritual...?

 
PS- Huge thanks to everybody that responded to my posting about my
experiences with censorship.  It really helped to hear from like-minded,
thoughtful voices...  Thanks. :-)
 
 

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