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Lesson Plans


Re: Texas Texbooks was RE: Elementary Art Job Openings


From: SANDRA ROWLAND (serowland)
Date: Wed Jul 26 2000 - 08:23:45 PDT

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    This thread required me to make a slight deviation here. Concerning art
    education in the schools and it's importance. Art ed encourages
    imagination and creativity which are vital to other subject areas and
    if we are to teach children to enter the real world eventually. Thinking
    skills are the key to success!
    My husband, the Ph.D. chemist, never had a day of art education in his
    life. It was never encouraged in school. Luckily, he does have a
    creative mind, probably thanks go to his parents. However, art is even
    necessary in his presentations of drug designs. He constantly calls me
    to advise on choice of color or what color makes what. If schools could
    see that art is used in all fields, maybe the importance of art ed would
    improve.
    My son had a counselor last year that told him that he needed chemistry
    because it would be used later in life and that art was not important.
    Yes, I did blow up! I pointed out to here that the best way to deal with
    a strong art student that could not see the relevance of chemistry is to
    relate it to the subject. Obviously, she needed imagination!
    As for Bush declaring in August that the year 2000 is the year of art
    ed, give us a break! The year is almost over. Just a scheme to get a few
    extra votes?
    Sorry about my ranting. Couldn't hold it in any longer!

    Sandra in AL

     " Imagination is more
    > important than knowledge" by Albert Einstein. I cannot really fathom not
    > actively encouraging the use of imagination and feel that it would be futile to
    > try to discourage imagination because, like creativity, I think it's already in
    > the 'wiring'.
    > > The word "imagination" was highly shunned in North Texas school districts in

    ---
    



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