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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1172

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Stephanie Ignazio (smi)
Mon, 18 Jan 1999 20:27:58 -0500


cheryl, Thank you for your thoughtful ideas. I appreciate them. In my school
we have a special period for art integration work. In this period both I and
the classroom teacher work together to produce a project that fits well into
both my curriculum and theirs. Believe me there have been some very
rediculous requests that i have not participated in. This particular teacher
approaches me all the time about integrating the art and the math
specialties. I'm not truly thrilled about the whole thing..perhaps it may
very well blow over. It's just very prominent in her mind I bet because the
tests are going to hit soon and the results just came out a few weeks ago
and our town happened to do well. It's just pressure from all sides and I
think she thinks I know something fantastic about mapping...which I don't.
But we'll see. I did get an interesting idea from one teacher on the
listserve. I may read up on it and see if that fits the bill. I'm just
afriad that it might BORE the kids out of their minds. Our art class is a
real time for imagination and this may just be too REAL for them. Thank you
for listening, Stephanie
-----Original Message-----
From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest.edu>
To: artsednet-digest.edu
<artsednet-digest.edu>
Date: Monday, January 18, 1999 7:46 PM
Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1172

>
>artsednet-digest Monday, January 18 1999 Volume 02 : Number
1172
>
>
>
>This edition includes :
>Re: geometry and Art: again
>Re: clay lamps
>Re: Catch up
>Sand sculptures
>re: 40's art
>RE:Drape mold
>Re: Drape mold
>Classes for pre advanced placement in graphic art
>Egyptian video?
>a great photo site
>Sandsculpture website
>Art Cars
>Re: Animals
>Re: Animals
>Re: geometry and Art: again
>Prehistoric Art
>Digital effects site/Attn:High school or college
>Clay lamps
>Coils and Drape Molds
>Art Ed. Garage Sale
>Sandsculpture website
>Eva Ruiz, artist
>Re: geometry and Art: again
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 19:53:44 +0100
>From: nop62861 <teresatorreseca>
>Subject: Re: geometry and Art: again
>
>Geometry in the mosaique floor or in the tiles of islamic art could be an
>example of patterns, geometry, art.
>Best regards from Portugal
>Teresa
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 17:01:52 -0500
>From: "Mike Delaney" <edelaney>
>Subject: Re: clay lamps
>
>Wrap the metal tube in newspaper. Take the newspaper. Line it up with the
>bottom of the tube. Wrapp to cover. Be very neat. Over lab the edges of
>the newspaper on the side of the rube. Put a piece of tape on the outside
>where the newspaper overlabs. Make sure no tape is sticking thenewspper to
>the tube. Roll out you slab. Roll the tube acrross the slab. Line up
>the bottom edge with a straight edge of the slab. As you roll make sure
>the slab wraps around the roll. This is done with the roll on its side.
>Attach, cut etc. the slab. You can now stand it up. Let dry to pre
>leather hard. Take you hand and pull out the metal tube, or plastic, or
>cardboard. The newspaper wasn't attachd to the tube. The tube slips right
>out. If you want to attach a bottom you can also do that with the tube in.
> After taking the tube out the piece still need to dry and become more firm
>before handling. Good luck. also I put textures on the slab before
>wrapping. Enola in Indiana
>
>- ----------
>> From: San D Hasselman <kprs>
>> To: Fran Marze <fmaiu+@pitt.edu>
>> Cc: Lynnzi; artsednet.edu
>> Subject: Re: clay lamps
>> Date: Sunday, January 17, 1999 4:33 PM
>>
>> You actually don't have to remove the paper, it burns out into ash, which
>you then
>> wash away...but you must have good ventillation!
>>
>> San D
>>
>> Fran Marze wrote:
>>
>> > Did you try using newspaper on the form before the clay? Thenyou could
>> > gently pull out the news. I seem to remember doing this in college on a
>> > large form but using wrapped newspaper. It did not crack. Fran
>> >
>> > On Sat, 16 Jan 1999 Lynnzi wrote:
>> >
>> > > A few months ago I wrote in about ideas for making a clay lamp.
>Several
>> > > people wrote back with great ideas. I have been trying to make one
>with the
>> > > method of wrapping a slab around a cylindrical base. I have been
>using some
>> > > metal tubing found in the hardware store. My problem is when the
>clay is
>> > > wrapped it is fine but as it beginning to dry it cracks all the way
>down the
>> > > side. I have to wait until a certain point before I can take it off
>the
>> > > cylinder so that it will keep its shape Help, I have to make twelve
>of these.
>> > > Any suggestions?
>> > >
>>
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 17:25:04 EST
>From: Skiart
>Subject: Re: Catch up
>
>In a message dated 99-01-17 13:32:15 EST, smi writes:
>
><<
> Could I trouble you for some info on these self-directed projects you have
> in the envelopes? It sounds like a fantastic idea and would love to know
how
> long each project takes, etc. Thanks >>
>
>Stephanie,
>I'll snail mail a copy of each.
>
>I get ideas from School Arts magazine, Jay Conley's packet or other books.
>I go to the NAEA convention exhibition hall and pick up everything in sight
>that is free (the material and lesson plan). Right now I am looking at
Roylco,
>Nasco and Crayola.
>
>I also buy anything I see anywhere I go that I think may be interesting to
the
>kids.
>I look for clearance books.
>I picked up some small stencil books by theme for $1 each in the museum
store
>at Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY.
>I buy Dover books at Barnes & Noble or Borders. They are creative Finish
the
>Drawing and color. I have a book that asks for you to draw an invention
>for.......etc.
>
>I also look on the internet sites and print interesting lesson plans.
>I go into product web sites.
>
>I have a book called Art Starters that has 1 page lesson plans.
>
>Kids will go to the envelopes 10 min. before class is over, so the lesson
>takes about 2 classes, but I tell the student to begin it and then set it
>aside when we start on the next class project, and resume inbetween big
class
>projects.
>
>Sue
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 17:43:30 -0600 (CST)
>From: Judy Grochowski <jfgro>
>Subject: Sand sculptures
>
>>Date: Thu, 14 Jan 1999 11:35:55 +0000
>>From: Christine Merriam <ktwnldy.az.us>
>>To: artsednet.edu
>>Subject: Sand sculptures
>
>> I recall seeing one in a
>>Mall somewhere.
>> Does anyone know how they keep the sand together? I think it is a
>>mixture of white glue, water, and sand.... Good alternative to snow
>>sculptures. My district will even deliver the sand!
>>Christine Merriam
>>Kayenta Intermediate School
>>
>Christine, This year at a mall close by (Southridge, for you locals) there
>was (and it is still standing, I believe) a Christmas tree sand sculpture
>done by a couple of guys who called their organization Sculptors of
America,
>(they had a card, which I passed along to my co-worker who teaches
sculpture
>this year). Anyway I chatted with one of the guys and he told me they use
>just fine sand, like you'd find at a playground and sculpt it damp, and
>spray it with a fine mist of watered down white glue. He said it could stay
>pretty stable that way, altho if someone wanted to vandalize it, that
>wouldn't provide any protection. He also said the sand was so "clean" in
>terms of the amt of glue used, that it could easily be recycled back to a
>play ground, or on to the next project, so apparently they don't use much.
>This particular sculpture is a good two stories tall and fairly wide, and I
>think it's all just sand, I don't beieve there's an armature under it. They
>had a card, as I say, and I'm certain it listed a website, but I just never
>went there-now that I think about it perhaps I'll do some surfing. They
>travel all over the country doing these installations....Has anyone else
>seen their work? Quite impressive!!!
>Judy Grochowski
>Greenfield High
>Greenfield Wisc
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 16:10:38 PST
>From: "Sharon Hause" <smhause>
>Subject: re: 40's art
>
>I come across boxes and boxes of old Life magazines which has been a
>great source of information. Put out an "all-call", check local second
>hand stores, etc. I realize that some of the magazines are valuable
>monetary, but for us they are more valuable in the art room.
>
>
>>From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
>>To: "artsednet" <artsednet.edu>
>>Subject: re: 40's art
>>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 14:08:46 -0700
>>
>>I am interested in doing a project on the 40's - the War Years,
>etc...any
>>ideas where I can go for references? Thanks, Linda in NM
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 16:19:30 PST
>From: "Sharon Hause" <smhause>
>Subject: RE:Drape mold
>
>Another type of drape mold besides plaster is forms found in your
>kitchen, garage, and local second hand stores. Look for shapes that
>have relief on the outside or outside edge. LIGHTLY spray the side to
>be formed over with W D-40. I often use a mixture of white and red clay
>marbeled together then rolled into a slab to drap over the form. Remove
>when dry enough to hold shape. It'll give you wonderful shapes and
>relief images.
>
>______________________________________________________
>Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 19:52:43 -0500
>From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
>Subject: Re: Drape mold
>
>sounds a little like making paper molds.
>
>Sharon Hause wrote:
>>
>> Another type of drape mold besides plaster is forms found in your
>> kitchen, garage, and local second hand stores.
>Sandra Barrick
>http://home.fuse.net/astroboy/Sandra.html
>
>astroboy
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 17:31:43 -0700
>From: Josie Terry <omorain>
>Subject: Classes for pre advanced placement in graphic art
>
>Our middle school is working on using advanced placement classes for
>students. The teachers are working on ideas for entrance requirements
>lenient or specific and teaching ideas or framework. I would like to
>present something for 6th and 7th grade art coming into 6th from
>elementary and into 7th. Has anyone done this and do you have
>suggestions for criteria and how to present it
>Josie in New Mexico
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 20:34:16 -0600
>From: Teri Sanford <terily>
>Subject: Egyptian video?
>
>Does anyone have a good recommendation for a video on Egyptian art or
>culture? I need it for grade 2-5. This may have been discussed before,
>but I can't remember.
>
>Thanks!!
>
>teri
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 21:56:37 -0500
>From: jeryl Hollingsworth <holl5>
>Subject: a great photo site
>
>Hi all,
>I found this site recently - it looks like a great resource for finding
>a photo quickly and easily. Could our photo files be going high tech?
>By the way I found the site on the Blue Web Weekly update which lists
>new sites weekly. I have found some great sites here.Blue Web is:
>http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/bluewebn
>The photo site:
>http://image.altavista.com/cgi-bin/avncgi
>
> Jeryl in S.C. where its raining, raining, raining
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 21:18:43 -0600
>From: Judy Grochowski <jfgro>
>Subject: Sandsculpture website
>
>I surfed, (actually, I'm procrastinating on grades!) Here it is-they are
>impressive!!!!
>http://www.sandsculpture.com/
>
>Judy Grochowski
>Greenfield High
>Greenfield Wisc
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Sun, 17 Jan 1999 21:52:12 -0700
>From: "ALPHAME" <ALPHAME>
>Subject: Art Cars
>
>There will be an ArtCar Parade on February 14, at he new Scottsdale Museum
>of Contemporary Art's grand opening day. The Art Guys from Texas will be
>there, too to help celebrate the opening. There will be activities for
>children, bands, a Calder exhibit and much more. If you are in the area,
>please come..
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 10:23:39 -0500
>From: "Kerry Flynn" <kflynn64>
>Subject: Re: Animals
>
>A great book on Animal power, energy and various traditions such as Native
>american, medieval, Egyptian etc, is the book Animal Speak (I have my copy
>at work and can't remember the author). I picked it up at Borders.
>- -----Original Message-----
>From: Stephanie Ignazio <smi>
>To: clarkea@s-cwis.unomaha.edu <clarkea@s-cwis.unomaha.edu>
>Cc: artsed <artsednet.edu>
>Date: Saturday, January 16, 1999 12:50 PM
>Subject: Animals
>
>
>>Amanda, I teach my students all about animals that hold certain powers..so
>>don't feel like you are crazy. I stumbled upon some information last year
>>about SENUFO cloth paintings. The Senufo people are from the North Central
>>area of the Ivory Coast, neighboring Mali. Their masks and cloth paintings
>>are among the most re-knowned of Africa. I have never done a search for
the
>>info on the web..but maybe it exists out there. Another way to go are the
>>Aborigines of Australia if you are looking for other cultures and
>>information..they believe animals to have special qualities as well. I
just
>>did this culture with my first graders and they loved it! Good luck,
>>Stephanie
>>
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 11:33:17 -0500
>From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
>Subject: Re: Animals
>
>Just came from Borders books, I found a book titled-"ZOO"- in
>smaller print above it says, "Animals in art". I browsed through, it
>seems to also break up into countries of the artist and has a wide
>variety of paintings etc. Seems to be about an inch thick and also
>around 5"x5".
>Nice size basic black background. price around $17.99.
>
>
>Sandra Barrick
>http://home.fuse.net/astroboy/Sandra.html
>astroboy
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 10:37:48 -0600
>From: Ckart <ckupcin>
>Subject: Re: geometry and Art: again
>
>Stephanie
>
>I'm not sure of your grade level, but "artists as architects" seems to fit
>the general approach. How about a homework assignment: measure their
>bedroom, major objects, do two (different) schematics of rearranged objects
>on graph paper. (Obviously this would be for older kids.) You could do the
>intro on the architect part in art, they could finish it in their regular
>classroom.
>
>For younger kids, maybe they could "map" their route to and from school
>(how many houses, blocks, where they turn, what they cross); or map out
>their routine in the school building itself (homeroom, specials, library,
>cafeteria, playground, etc.) The Family Circle cartoon recently showed one
>of the kids as he took a VERY rambling route, through all parts of the
>building, on his way to the washroom (kind of an aerial perspective).
>
>Two things bothered me:
>>she wants it to be an activity that will help them with the testing
>That's really her job, not yours.
>>I guess part of the test involves them mapping out a garden????
>This should not dictate your selection of a project that emphasizes your
>curriculum -- ART and geometry (not vice-versa).
>
>Hope this helps :)
>
>Cheryl
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 12:58:54 -0600
>From: mthoresen <mthoresen.us>
>Subject: Prehistoric Art
>
>Art History Lovers,
>
>Does anyone have any good ideas for videos, filmstrips... on PreHistoric
>Art History. I'd like to order some for next year, for now I guess I''
>have to rely on our Library.
>
>Thanks Mona-in-the-snow
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 13:39:09 -0500
>From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
>Subject: Digital effects site/Attn:High school or college
>
>************************************************************************
>Hi guys, This is a web site for digital effects which came over from
>flame news. You might be interested.
>
>http://www.digieffects.com/
>
>Sandra Barrick
>http://home.fuse.net/astroboy/Sandra.html
>
>astroboy
>************************************************************************
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 21:29:09 +0100 (MET)
>From: marilyn.juda (Marilyn Juda Orlandi)
>Subject: Clay lamps
>
>Always line your non-absorbent tube with several layers of newspapers
before
>rolling the slab around it. That way it doesn't stick and the metal tubing
>slips out easily and the newspapers stay inside to give it form until it
>dries, but newspapers being flexible the clay won't crack when it shrinks.
>Ciao,
>Marilyn Juda-orlandi
>Monte Porzio Catone, Italy
>
>>Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 19:20:44 EST
>>From: Lynnzi
>>Subject: clay lamps
>>
>>A few months ago I wrote in about ideas for making a clay lamp. Several
>>people wrote back with great ideas. I have been trying to make one with
the
>>method of wrapping a slab around a cylindrical base. I have been using
some
>>metal tubing found in the hardware store. My problem is when the clay is
>>wrapped it is fine but as it beginning to dry it cracks all the way down
the
>>side. I have to wait until a certain point before I can take it off the
>>cylinder so that it will keep its shape Help, I have to make twelve of
these.
>>Any suggestions?
>>
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 21:28:27 +0100 (MET)
>From: marilyn.juda (Marilyn Juda Orlandi)
>Subject: Coils and Drape Molds
>
>Marian,
>Try covering your molds with a piece of thin cotton material before draping
>over them. The clay won't stick to the mold and the material moves with
the
>clay when it shrinks so it doesn't crack.
>
>Also coil designs are great INSIDE of molds such as pots, plastic bowls,
>frying pans, etc, but always lining with a piece of cotton material for the
>same reasons as above.
>
>In fact rolling out your slabs on material can give interesting textures,
>try burlap, or corduroy, or a heavy weave. Makes the slab work more
>interesting.
>
>Ciao,
>Marilyn Juda-orlandi
>Monte Porzio Catone, Italy
>
>>
>>Date: Sat, 16 Jan 1999 12:55:58 -0500
>>From: One of the Colmans <colmans1>
>>Subject: Drape mold
>>
>>I have been experimenting with drape molds in my high school ceramics
class.
>>I made solid molds by filling plastic bowls with plaster. The students
>>invert these and build a pot on the outside. They have been using
>>embellished coil designs instead of a solid slab of clay to cover the
mold.
>>The problem is that by the time they finish ( it usually takes 3 to 4
class
>>periods) it is very difficult to remove the pot. The pot seems to really
>>stick to the mold when the clay is still fairly moist. If we wait until
it
>>is closer to leather hard, it tends to crack. I realize that the clay is
>>shrinking and that is why it's cracking, but I don't know when the optimum
>>time is to remove the pot. Are the kids presing onto the mold too tightly
>>when they construct their coil designs? Also, has anyone found any
>>interesting containers to make molds out of that are a bit different from
>>the traditional bowl? I'd like to be able to do platters etc. Thanks!
Marian
>>
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 15:41:36 -0500
>From: "Donna Janeczko" <redhen>
>Subject: Art Ed. Garage Sale
>
>I'm going out of the art education materials business, so I've inventoried
>my stock and am having a "garage sale" at greatly reduced prices at:
>
>http://members.tripod.com/~LittleRed_2/index.html
>
>There are lots of prints there at $4.00 each, among other things.
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 17:17:15 -0600 (CST)
>From: Judy Grochowski <jfgro>
>Subject: Sandsculpture website
>
>I surfed, (actually, I'm procrastinating on grades!) Here it is-they are
>impressive!!!!
>http://www.sandsculpture.com/
>(Pardon me if this already went thru, but I didn't see it, so I re-sent it)
>
>Judy Grochowski
>Greenfield High
>Greenfield Wisc
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 19:27:35 EST
>From: Skiart
>Subject: Eva Ruiz, artist
>
>Hello
>Does anyone have anything on Eva Ruiz? The 3rd grade lesson uses her
artwork
>as an example of a design in the Adventures in Art, 3rd gr lesson #7
entitled
>"See and Touch Textures". She has a crayon rubbing I like in a small size
in
>my teacher's edition. I want to find a reproduction of her work or at least
a
>full page picture from a book. At best, I can use an opaque projector with
>this picture.
>I bought Roylco--Shade Tex and Optical Illusion rubbing plates, and I love
the
>plates. I want to do crayon resist with the texture rubbings, cut them up
into
>squares and rectangles and arrange into a design.
>What other artists can I reference for rubbings? (besides Max Ernst in the
>lesson)
>Sue
>
>------------------------------
>
>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 1999 18:40:04 -0600
>From: Melissa Chaney <meemo>
>Subject: Re: geometry and Art: again
>
>This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>- --------------F385B6985733F1E7EA335680
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>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
>
>
>
>>
>>
>> For younger kids, maybe they could "map" their route to and from school
>> (how many houses, blocks, where they turn, what they cross); or map out
>> their routine in the school building itself (homeroom, specials, library,
>> cafeteria, playground, etc.) The Family Circle cartoon recently showed
one
>> of the kids as he took a VERY rambling route, through all parts of the
>> building, on his way to the washroom (kind of an aerial perspective).
>>
>>
>
>I did a project last year with my 7th graders on this topic. They created
a
>map of their home town. It had to show how to get from school to their
house.
>It also had to have a legend and accuracy was important. (legend
contained,
>railroads, bodies of water, bridges, cemetaries and other landmarks)
Students
>also included stores around their homes. I went to visit every student
when
>their map was complete. I brought a bag of candy and said hi to parents at
>home. This was even better than that positive phone call home. It only
took
>me about 3 days after school to visit about 40 students. I planned my
route
>and visited kids in specific ares each day. I did have to collect maps
from
>the area chamber of commerce. A post office or library could also help.
These
>were used to guide students in lableing street names around their house.
It's
>amazing how they don't reads street signs. Kids knew ahead of time that I
>would bring them a treat if they had an accurate map.
>
>
>
>
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>
>------------------------------
>
>End of artsednet-digest V2 #1172
>********************************
>
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