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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1152

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Josie Terry (omorain)
Fri, 08 Jan 1999 20:35:07 -0700


artsednet-digest wrote:

> artsednet-digest Thursday, January 7 1999 Volume 02 : Number 1152
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: portraits
> classroom funnies/believe it or not!
> Re: calendar art
> Re: transferring images
> re: Celtic Art
> Fw: Good Friends
> Re: how to glue play clay like bricks
> Re: transferring images
> Re: calendar art
> Special student art exhibit
> request for lesson ideas
> Re: calendar art
> Re: request for lesson ideas
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 10:40:51 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
> Subject: Re: portraits
>
> What age group - I assume high school...thanks, Linda
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Fields, Linda <fieldsl.us>
> To: 'Bicyclken' <Bicyclken>
> Cc: 'artsednet.edu' <artsednet.edu>
> Date: Thursday, January 07, 1999 10:27 AM
> Subject: RE: portraits
>
> >I do something similar to this, too, but before this stage, I set up a
> model
> >with a spotlight, darken the room and give the kids big brushes, black
> >paint, and large white paper. I have them look for, and paint, only the
> dark
> >areas. They have difficulty at first because they are so used to line, but
> >after several tries they begin to get recognizable images. I explain to
> them
> >that this is one of the differences between drawing and painting-that
> >instead of using outlines we are looking for and painting shape and volume.
> >After they feel comfortable with this, we move on to looking for gradations
> >of value and use mixed or diluted paint for it. I do this with art II.
> Linda
> >in NC
> >
> >> ----------
> >> From: Bicyclken[SMTP:Bicyclken]
> >> Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 1998 10:29 AM
> >> To: ArtAltman; artsednet.edu
> >> Subject: Re: portraits
> >>
> >> In a message dated 12/22/98 7:47:50 PM Pacific Standard Time,
> >> ArtAltman writes:
> >>
> >> << Also I was hoping to incorporate pastels or oil pastels
> >> in the final drawing. Do you have any ideas on how to incorporate
> >> pastels
> >> without loosing detail? >>
> >>
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> I do an assignment in my Art 2 class that uses conte crayon on toned
> >> paper.
> >> This process helps them to see the range of dark to light and to
> >> accentuate
> >> the contrast of light. I begin like you have planned and have them draw
> >> each
> >> other for a practice, ( straight on). Next we look at resources that use
> >> a
> >> dominance of dark with strong highlights. We look for 3/4 views and
> >> profiles
> >> as well.
> >>
> >> When they have found something that is interesting we sketch it out on
> >> news
> >> print and transfer the outlines to toned(grey, canson mi-tientes) paper
> >> with
> >> carbon paper. By using only white conte, they begin to lay in the
> >> lightest
> >> values, when finished they look at the darkest and use black. Tortillons
> >> are
> >> used to soften the conte into the paper and by leaving a majority of grey
> >> paper they can see the portrait.
> >>
> >> This would take more than 8 days but you might like it.
> >>
> >> Ken Schwab
> >> San Jose, CA
> >>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 12:02:31 -0600
> From: Dave Beaman <dbeaman.mn.us>
> Subject: classroom funnies/believe it or not!
>
> Greetings to all from Minnesota- It's about -20 degrees here today and lots
> of accidents
> because of "black ice." I've enjoyed the classroom funnies over the past
> few weeks. my
> contributions aren't so funny as unbelievable!
>
> This happened one of my first years as a teacher:
> I called in sick one day, early in the morning, as was the practice in those
> days.
> For some reason, I called the school late in the afternoon. The assistant
> principal
> answered the phone and let out a gasp...... He hung up the phone on me! I
> found
> out the next day that the "office" hadn't called a sub- they forgot all
> about it! He
> hung up the phone and ran down to my classes- all the kids had been coming
> into
> class all day long; had been working without supervision. The "office"
> joked that
> they didn't need an art teacher because the kids could take care of
> themselves!
>
> Another "believe it or not" happened about 5 years ago...... I got a message
> from
> the "principal's office" stating that I had a (unnamed in the note) student
> in my class
> that "may go berserk" in the classroom. The note went on to state that "if
> the student
> went out of control, I was to evacuate the room- but I was to stay to make
> certain the
> student was not injured........
>
> Dave Beaman
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 12:17:18 -0600
> From: Teri Sanford <terily>
> Subject: Re: calendar art
>
> I also put out lots of examples. You have to be careful, though, because some
> kids will copy directly from one of the examples. I also tell them they can
> take ideas from the samples but it must be their own way of putting it together,
> it shouldn't look exactly like one of the examples. I still have the occasional
> "copier" but since I always read Tomie de Paola's The Art Lesson at the
> beginning of each year, copying is pretty low. (If you haven't read it, there
> is one part where he says "REAL artists don't COPY")
>
> teri
>
> Larry Cox wrote:
>
> > My picture file consists of realistic, and "unrealistic" - a lot of how
> > other artists interpret - and they all interpret a scene differently -
> > Picasso is certainly a good point of reference. When I do a demonstration,
> > I put up a lot of samples, in my case, that includes other student works, as
> > well as old samples of mine that I have finished. I stress that there is
> > not a right or wrong way, etc. I also put up photographs of whatever we are
> > drawing, painting, if applicable... Linda
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 16:25:13 EST
> From: Paradise52
> Subject: Re: transferring images
>
> Re. your question about acrylic polymer being used to "lift" color photos from
> magazines for use in collage, I have done this many times and it works really
> well. Make sure you use 4-6 layers of polymer- let dry between layers, (final
> drying should be overnight); place photo into a warm water bath and allow
> paper to soak thoroughly; gently rub off saturated paper. Polymer will turn
> white but will regain its transparency when dry. It can then be attached to
> the collage using more polymer. Polymer must be applied smoothly without any
> large white gobs, otherwise, you will lose transparency in this area. Also, it
> seems to work best with quality photos from a Natl. Geographic, but even
> newspaper photos have worked. You may have to play with the number of layers
> of acrylic polymer- if needed add more! Good Luck!
> p.s. as an art teacher for 20 years, I have come to believe strongly in using
> materials that are safe for kids. We are not doing the children any good when
> we opt for volatile materials such as lighter fluid use in the classroom. I
> would even question the use of this in a high school class! I feel you are
> setting yourself up for a big disaster!
> M.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:52:02 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
> Subject: re: Celtic Art
>
> I just happened to come across a book with Celtic knots woven around the
> borders on the cover. It is a 1963 paperback called Sword at Sunset, a King
> Arthur book by Rosemary Sutcliff. (That's beside the point.) There are
> little dragons at the top and a sword on the side. Mandalas from knots,
> comes to mind. Geometric patterns, an Escher-like circle comes to mind. I
> was in a 6th grade music class yesterday and the teacher put on Riverdance
> as an example of Celtic music. She also talked about how that was the era
> of the inventions of a lot of instruments, stringed and horn...and of
> Written Music. (Illustrated Manuscripts - Book of Kells previously
> mentioned in this web.) Dragons, knights, ladies would appeal to me if I
> were doing a Celtic unit. Linda
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 15:56:28 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
> Subject: Fw: Good Friends
>
> - -
>
> >
> >1. In kindergarten your idea of a good friend was the person who let you
> >have the red crayon when all that was left was the ugly black one.
> >2. In first grade your idea of a good friend was the person who went to the
> >bathroom with you and held your hand as you walked through the scary halls.
> >3. In second grade your idea of a good friend was the person who helped you
> >stand up to the class bully.
> >4. In third grade your idea of a good friend was the person who shared
> their
> >lunch with you when you forgot yours on the bus.
> >5. In fourth grade your idea of a good friend was the person who was
> willing
> >to switch square dancing partners in gym so you wouldn't have to be stuck
> >do-si-do-ing with Nasty Nicky or Smelly Susan.
> >6. In fifth grade your idea of a friend was the person who saved a seat on
> >the back of the bus for you.
> >7. In sixth grade your idea of a friend was the person who went up to Nick
> >or Susan, your new crush, and asked them to dance with you, so that if they
> >said no you wouldn't have to be embarrassed.
> >8. In seventh grade your idea of a friend was the person who let you copy
> >the social studies homework from the night before that you forgot to do.
> >9. In eighth grade your idea of a good friend was the person who helped you
> >pack up your stuffed animals and old baseball cards so that your room would
> >be a "high schooler's" rooom, but didn't laugh at you when you finished
> and
> >broke out into tears.
> >10. In ninth grade your idea of a good friend was the person who went to
> >that "cool" party thrown by a senior so you wouldn't wind up being the only
> >freshman there.
> >11. In tenth grade your idea of a good friend was the person who changed
> >their schedule so you would have someone to sit with at lunch.
> >12. In eleventh grade your idea of a good friend was the person who gave
> you
> >rides in their new car, convinced your parents that you shouldn't be
> >grounded, consoled you when you broke up with Nick or Susan, and found you
> a
> >date to the prom.
> >13. In twelfth grade your idea of a good friend was the person who helped
> >you pick out a college, assured you that you would get into that college,
> >helped you deal with your parents who were having a hard time adjusting to
> >the idea of letting you go...
> >14. At graduation your idea of a good friend was the person who was crying
> >on the inside but managed the biggest smile one could give as they
> >congratulated you.
> >15. The summer after twelfth grade your idea of a good friend was the
> person
> >who helped you clean up the bottles from that party,helped you sneak out of
> >the house when you just couldn't deal with your parents, assured you that
> >now that you and Nick or you and Susan were back together, you could make
> it
> >through anything, helped you pack pack for college and just silently
> hugged
> >you as you looked through blurry eyes at 18 years of memories you were
> >leaving behind, and finally on those last days of childhood, went out of
> >their way to come over and send you off with a hug, a lot of memories,
> >reassurance that you would make it in college as well as you had these past
> >18 years, and most importantly sent you off to college knowing you were
> >loved.
> >16. Now, your idea of a good friend is still the person who gives you the
> >better of the two choices, holds your hand when you're scared, helps you
> >fight off those who try to take advantage of you, thinks of you at times
> >when you are not there, reminds you of what you have forgotten, helps you
> >put the past behind you but understands when you need to hold on to it a
> >little longer, stays with you so that you have confidence, goes out of
> their
> >way to make time for you, helps you clear up your mistakes, helps you deal
> >with pressure from others, smiles for you when they are sad, helps you
> >become a better person, and most importantly loves you!
> >Thank you for being a friend.
> >No matter where we go or who we become, never forget who helped us get
> >there.
> >There's never a wrong time to pick up a phone or send a message telling
> your
> >friends how much you miss them or how much you love them.
> >Pass on to those friends of the past, and those of the future ... and those
> >you have met along the way...
> >"Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling."
> > -Margaret Lee Runbeck
> >
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 17:16:52 -0600
> From: "Lockie&BrickChapman" <lbchapman>
> Subject: Re: how to glue play clay like bricks
>
> The frosting recipe you requested is called Royal Icing-- one cup
> confectioners sugar beat with 1 egg WHite
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Sheldonlk <Sheldonlk>
> To: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
> Date: Wednesday, January 06, 1999 11:47 PM
> Subject: how to glue play clay like bricks
>
> > Our Pre K class has been abserving construction of four duplexes
> across
> >from the school. The teacher is going to make a dough recipe using
> >cornstarch, it's one that I gave her because it dries very hard, to have
> >students make bricks. Students will roll out the dough cut out bricks and
> let
> >them dry. The question is does anyone have an idea how the bricks can be
> >mortored together. We need to use something that's not to runny, and it
> can't
> >dry to fast, and it needs to stick to the bricks once it drys. We thought
> of
> >possibly the frosting used in constructing gingerbread houses. If anyone
> has a
> >recipe for that frosting or any other ideas please send them to me.
> Remember
> >these children are four years old. thank you for your help.
> > Sheldon Koester
> > in Tucson Arizona
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 19:11:56 EST
> From: AbeleSmith
> Subject: Re: transferring images
>
> In a message dated 1/4/99 11:19:57 PM Central Standard Time, mmhar
> writes:
>
> << >Does anyone know an alternative to lighter fluid foe the transferring
> >of a magazine image for collage? Will acrylic polymer work?
>
> I like gel medium, but, I've gotten some good ideas off of this listserv
> a while back like this one (sorry can't remember who gave it): 1/2 cup
> turpentine, 2 cups water, small sliver of bar soap.
>
> Also, rubber cement works pretty well.
> >>
> The problem with these is that you're not reducing or eliminating the toxicity
> like you had with the lighter fluid. Might as well smell the fluid!
>
> Terry
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 17:19:42 -0800
> From: Maggie White <mwhite>
> Subject: Re: calendar art
>
> Gail1611 wrote:
> >
> > I feel at times that a picture file is very important. At
> > other times I wonder if the kids would be more imanaginative if I didn't
> > stress realistic all the time. I keep wondering if I should be helping the
> > kids to develop their imagination in a greater fashion. Would do you all
> > think? Gail
>
> Well, the Surrealists were pretty imaginative... Picasso could draw
> "realistically," and well, even at a young age, but that certainly didn't
> stop him from being more imaginative than ten people put together (oops,
> hope this resurrect the Can't-stand-Picasso thread ;) )
>
> Seriously, drawing as a skill has really foundered in the last few
> decades. How many of you learned drawing skills in HS or college? I
> sure didn't. I had to teach myself. A drawing professor at an art
> school my students and I have visited laments the almost total lack of
> basic skills her students come to class with. I think a good foundation
> in drawing from direct observation--or photographs--is a necessity for
> any other skills in art. It doesn't have to limit their imagination; you
> can always create assignments that are open-ended, with a lot of room for
> personal interpretations.
>
> Maggie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 19:30:24 -0600
> From: gregjuli
> Subject: Special student art exhibit
>
> Hi all,
> BIG, big favor to ask of all. (Thanks for this idea Gigi !) My 8th grade
> Honors class will be trying to put a special exhibit together of art
> from the United States (and other places) for our annual Art Fair.
> Their goal is to get at least a couple pieces of student art work form
> as many places as possible. We will be happy if you can even send at
> least one!!!!!
> Please respond to my e- mail and I will give you a mailing address.
> Thanks,
> MaryB ( freezin in Wis.)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 07 Jan 1999 21:39:03 -0500 (EST)
> From: Jen Schiano <QXJF>
> Subject: request for lesson ideas
>
> Hi all
> I am at a loss. I will be starting my student teaching experience at the end
> of January. I learned that I will be responsible for a lesson on drawing for
> the 6th grade. Does anyone have a ny suggestions for me?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 20:12:13 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
> Subject: Re: calendar art
>
> I agree. I teach a basic drawing class that emphasizes edges. It works,
> too. The smallest of kids Get It. Linda in NM
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Maggie White <mwhite>
> To: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
> Date: Thursday, January 07, 1999 6:03 PM
> Subject: Re: calendar art
>
> >Gail1611 wrote:
> >>
> >> I feel at times that a picture file is very important. At
> >> other times I wonder if the kids would be more imanaginative if I didn't
> >> stress realistic all the time. I keep wondering if I should be helping
> the
> >> kids to develop their imagination in a greater fashion. Would do you
> all
> >> think? Gail
> >
> >Well, the Surrealists were pretty imaginative... Picasso could draw
> >"realistically," and well, even at a young age, but that certainly didn't
> >stop him from being more imaginative than ten people put together (oops,
> >hope this resurrect the Can't-stand-Picasso thread ;) )
> >
> >Seriously, drawing as a skill has really foundered in the last few
> >decades. How many of you learned drawing skills in HS or college? I
> >sure didn't. I had to teach myself. A drawing professor at an art
> >school my students and I have visited laments the almost total lack of
> >basic skills her students come to class with. I think a good foundation
> >in drawing from direct observation--or photographs--is a necessity for
> >any other skills in art. It doesn't have to limit their imagination; you
> >can always create assignments that are open-ended, with a lot of room for
> >personal interpretations.
> >
> >Maggie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 7 Jan 1999 20:15:57 -0700
> From: "Larry Cox" <L_J_Cox>
> Subject: Re: request for lesson ideas
>
> As a sub, I have successfully taught a very basic kind of drawing - with
> emphasis on the edges...or outside lines. Mona Brookes has a good book on
> Teaching Children to Draw and another on Teaching Teen-agers and Adults to
> Draw, (I think those are the titles)...Give them the basic idea but allow
> them the freedom to finish their way is my advice. It works for me and
> usually they are pretty happy with the results. Linda in NM
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Jen Schiano <QXJF>
> To: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
> Date: Thursday, January 07, 1999 7:45 PM
> Subject: request for lesson ideas
>
> >Hi all
> >I am at a loss. I will be starting my student teaching experience at the
> end
> >of January. I learned that I will be responsible for a lesson on drawing
> for
> >the 6th grade. Does anyone have a ny suggestions for me?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1152
> ********************************
>
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Jen,
Mona Brookes book Drawing with Children is wonderful for this. I teach 6th grade
art and she allows you to copy ideas and do the 5 basic elements of shape and do
some abstracts to loosen them up and then start them with animals. I have used from
K to 7 the and it works. Use any or all. Do the elements of shape ID she tells you
to make the kids start looking at things as lines, and circles instead as a person
or a chair.
Josie in NM