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Lesson Plans


Re: .......thoughts on copying?

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
RWilk85411
Mon, 26 Jan 1998 05:36:44 EST


Amazing isn't it. All it takes is a little intellegent reasoning to realize
that there is a big difference in copying someone else's work and using photos
for reference. I too have a large collection of photos that I have taken. I
take a lot of photos when I travel and I take a lot specifically for my
students. I started using photos years ago when they insisted on drawing
mountains and I got tired of the inverted icecream cones and the scoops of
mashed potatoes. The photos I take for my students are deliberately not
compositions worth copying. I make it clear that the photos are for reference.
I frequently have them choose two or three from which they will use different
parts to form a compostion of their own. I have also found that a large
collection of buildings has made it more interesting to study linear
perspective. I have others which are good for atmospheric and spatial
perspective. Then I have pictures of animals, trees, people, etc. We also go
outside to draw. They actually seem to see better when we do. Now I am getting
together a collection of close-ups of my students with releases from them.
These are designed for drawing eyes, noses, mouths and hair. I have live
models for regular studies of faces and bodies. I learned from the photos to
break my students up into small drawing groups with each member of the group
taking a turn at modeling. This way each person gets to do several drawings of
faces and bodies and they are close enough to actuallly see.This year my
colleague and I lucked up on a housewares catalogue for which a wonderful
photographer had been hired and the reflections in the metal and glass
products were out of this world. This also gave me the opportunity to go into
copy rights. I give them permission to use the images in my photos. I make it
a very formal process. AFTER ALL SOME OF THE FIRST PEOPLE TO TAKE UP THE
CAMERA BACK IN THE 1850'S WERE ARTISTS WHO REALIZED THEIR POTENTIAL FOR
AVOIDING THE HEAT AND THE COLD AND WIGGLING MODELS. AND THEY STILL DO!!
PICASSO WAS NOT ALONE.
Reatha