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Lesson Plans


[Fwd: ORAL HISTORY AND REALITY OR WHAT?]

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Robert Beeching (robprod)
Sun, 25 Jan 1998 02:52:42 -0800


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MZ

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Message-ID: <34CB15CA.AA107545> Date: Sun, 25 Jan 1998 02:36:59 -0800 From: Robert Beeching <robprod> Reply-To: robprod Organization: Robert Beeching Productions X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.02 [en] (Win95; I) MIME-Version: 1.0 To: "robprod" <robprod> Subject: RE: ORAL HISTORY AND REALITY OR WHAT? Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------91A787FC587171889B1EB241"

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One who identifies himself only as "Larry" wrote:

"...can we please distinguish between inaccurate oral history and reality." ----------------------------------------------rb

Let's do. I apologies for placing Elliot Eisner at the center of DBAE. It is probably because his name seems so central to the issues! Quite by accident, I happened to follow him around Southeast Asia doing the rounds for DBAE in 1986. The Chinese in Hong Kong, at that time, were amused at the different views on American Art Education presented to them. As for history, will "historical analysis" fill the bill, or you may want to refer to someone who has researched the subject more fully than I:

"In Art Education, More DBAE Equals Less Art," a paper delivered by Thomas Ewens, a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design, to the annual convention of NAEA in Boston, 1987; where Ewens clearly delineates the DBAE philosophy and rationale, ala Eisner.

As far as Efland and Greer, they seem to hold little weight in the general visual arts community, and add little to current concerns for art training in the American public school system. There are other more objective views presented in the literature about how Americans have continually used and abused the arts in their public school system, i.e. Moholy-Nagy's, "VISION IN MOTION," and Georgy Kepes' "EDUCATION OF VISION," conveniently missing from Getty publications.

As for Ms. Duke, I do not know her background in art, but I hear that she was on the commission that published the latest California State Department of Education guidelines for the Visual and Performing Arts (3rd in 10 years). This should put the Getty in a viable position to promote DBAE. The last three guides certainly did not make much of an impression on the quality of student work during the past 10 yrs. But that is another issue. -------------------------------------------------------

Larry continues: (speaking of DBAE) "it has opened up a wealth of new directions" -------------------------------------------------------

Yes, and as far away from art training as possible. Everything but art training as evidenced by the work we see on many elementary classroom walls, i.e. thin pencil lines on over-sized paper hidden by color smears because the child was never taught how to use a pencil or given a brush big enough to do the job. Project art is still rampant. Total ignorance of "typography" in student posters. Where are these art specialists who are charged with enriching the "production" component of DBAE?

I worry about those future college students who will be the next generation of elementary and secondary teachers who will be teaching the visual arts. If the purpose of visual arts in education is not to teach children how to draw, paint, and to construct, what will they be able to show for their efforts? Where's the "meat" of the subject if it does not lie in "production." Will we continue to have no prerequisite for art instruction either for high school or college entrance?

Will we continue to have graduate students obtaining art degrees purely on their ability to write a concise paper. Will our children come away from school with the "misconception" that eveyone is a musician, actor, mathematician, physisist, and artist? If everyone is an artist - why art education in the first place? Let's just continue to feel "enriched" in our ignorance of what visual arts can be! --------------------------------------------------rb

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MZ

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One who identifies himself only as "Larry" wrote:

"...can we please distinguish between inaccurate oral history and reality."
----------------------------------------------rb

Let's do. I apologies for placing Elliot Eisner at the center of DBAE. It is probably because his name seems so central to the issues! Quite by accident, I happened to follow him around Southeast Asia doing the rounds for DBAE  in 1986. The Chinese in Hong Kong, at that time, were amused at the different views on American Art Education presented to them. As for history, will "historical analysis" fill the bill, or you may want to refer to someone who has researched the subject more fully than I:

"In Art Education, More DBAE Equals Less Art," a paper delivered by Thomas Ewens,  a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design, to the annual convention of NAEA  in Boston, 1987; where Ewens clearly delineates the DBAE philosophy and rationale, ala Eisner.

As far as Efland and Greer, they seem to hold little weight in the general visual arts community, and add little to current concerns for art training in the American public school system. There are other more objective views presented in the literature about how Americans have continually used and abused the arts in their public school system, i.e. Moholy-Nagy's, "VISION IN MOTION," and Georgy Kepes' "EDUCATION OF VISION," conveniently missing from Getty publications.

As for Ms. Duke, I do not know her background  in art, but I hear that she was on the commission that published the latest California State Department of Education guidelines for the Visual and Performing Arts (3rd  in 10 years). This should put the Getty in a viable position to promote DBAE. The last three guides certainly did not make much of an impression on the quality of student work during the past 10 yrs. But that  is another issue.
-------------------------------------------------------

Larry continues: (speaking of DBAE) "it has opened up a wealth of new directions"
-------------------------------------------------------

Yes, and as far away from art training as possible. Everything but art training as evidenced by the work we see on many elementary classroom walls, i.e. thin pencil lines on over-sized paper hidden by color smears because the child was never taught how to use a pencil or given a brush big enough to do the job. Project art is still rampant. Total  ignorance of "typography"  in student posters. Where are these art specialists who are charged with enriching the "production" component of DBAE?

I worry about those future college students who will be the next generation of elementary and secondary teachers who will be teaching the visual arts. If the purpose of visual arts in education is not to teach children how to draw, paint, and to construct, what will they be able to show for their efforts? Where's the "meat" of the subject if it does not lie in "production." Will we continue to have no prerequisite for art instruction either for high school or college entrance?

Will we continue to have graduate students obtaining art degrees purely on their ability to write a concise paper. Will our children come away from school with the "misconception" that eveyone is a musician, actor, mathematician, physisist, and artist? If everyone is an artist - why art education in the first place? Let's just continue to feel "enriched" in our ignorance of what visual arts can be!
--------------------------------------------------rb
 

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MZ
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