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Lesson Plans


Color Adjustment

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
ttipton.tz
Fri, 4 Jan 1980 01:38:30 +0300


A friend who has access to the Internet found the following
information on "Color Adjustment" at the following address:
I have seen both "Color Adjustment" and "Ethnic Notions" and can
highly recommend them to anyone interested in media, race, and
propoganda issues.

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/Newsreelmedia.html

You can also email them (see address the bottom of list) for more
information.

A description of California Newsreel - Media and Society Titles

Color Adjustment: Blacks in Prime Time Television
Ethnic Notions: Black People in White Minds
On Television: Teach the Children
On Television: The Violence Factor
On Television: Public Trust or Private Property
Race Against Prime Time

COLOR ADJUSTMENT

Producers: Marlon Riggs, Vivian Kleiman
Director: Marlon Riggs
88 minutes, 1991

In Color Adjustment Marlon Riggs brings his path breaking study of
racial
prejudice begun in Ethnic Notions into the Television Age. This
Peabody
Award winning film traces how network television reluctantly and
selectively
"integrated" African Americans into America's prime time family.

Clips from Amos 'n' Andy to Good Times, Roots and The Cosby Showand
interviews with producers like Norman Lear and Steve Bochco
illustrate how
network television absorbs deep-seated racial conflict into the
non-threatening
formats of primetime television. Actors including Esther Rolle,
Diahann
Carroll and Tim Reid as wellas cultural critics Henry Louis Gates,
Jr. and
Alvin Poussaint dissect the interplay between these series and
evolving black
demands for equality.

"A cogent and thoughtful survey of black America as represented by
television."
-- New York Times

"No one before Riggs has done such a thorough job...An epiphany!"
-- Houston A. Baker, Jr., University of Pennsylvania

ETHNIC NOTIONS

Producer/Director: Marlon Riggs
56 minutes, 1987

Ethnic Notions is Marlon Riggs' now classic documentary tracing the
evolution of the deeply rooted stereotypes which have fueled
anti-black
prejudice. Loyal Toms, carefree Sambos, faithful Mammies, leering
Coons
and wide-eyed Pickaninnies permeated popular culture from the
ante-bellum
period to the Civil Rights era, implanting themselves deeply in the
American
psyche.

Narration by Esther Rolle and commentary by eminent scholars
sidelight on
the origins and devastating consequences of this 150 yearlong parade
of
bigotry. Approaching a complex and delicate subject with great
sensitivity, this
Emmy Award winning film equips viewers to look at popular culture
with a
critical eye to bias.

"Provides far more insight than most documentaries...An invaluable
classroom aid."
-- Journal of American History

"Decades of studying Afro-American history did not prepare me for
the
devastating impact of this film. Anyone claiming to understand our
nation's
past must see this documentary."
-- Nell Irvin Painter, Princeton University

ON TELEVISION: TEACH THE CHILDREN

Producer: On Television, Ltd.
Director: Mary Magee
56 minutes, 1992

Children ages 6-11 spend more time watching television then they do
in a
classroom. They believe TV more than their parents, teachers or
books. But
what does television teach? Teach the Children is the first
documentary
designed to help educators and parents scrutinize television's
hidden
"curriculum."

Intercutting clips from Saturday morning cartoons, spots, sit-coms,
and music
videos with commentary by critics, scholars, and network executives,
Teach
the Children explores the values television communicates, the role
models it
provides, the behavior it motivates, and the cognitive skills it
encourages.

"How is it possible that television, the unparalleled educational
medium, could
also serve as an instrument of commercial child abuse?" asks
television
historian Erik Barnouw. "Teach the Children shows how, and suggests
the
implications for the future of our country."

According to Teach the Children, the primary lesson of television's
ads,
product-based cartoons, and insistent stress on fashion, style, and
conspicuous
consumption is "You are what you buy." "Broadcasters and advertisers
are
ganging up on children," says Action for Children's Television
founder Peggy
Charren

Other staples of the TV curriculum are sex, violence and
anti-intellectualism.
Most programs watched by children are made for adults, be it
America's Most
Wanted or Married with Children. Blonde bimbos and buffed studs
bounce
across the screen as looks and sexuality are privileged above all
else. The
20,000 murders an average child watches by the time he or she is a
teenager
normalizes violence. Edward Palmer, George Gerbner, Dorothy Singer
and
other scholars explain how these images contribute to aggressive
behavior,
lessened attention spans, and diminished cognitive abilities among
our young.

How did we let this happen? It's a far cry from the "university of
the air"
originally promised by broadcasters. Teach the Children chronicles
the
history of television and public policy - including the dropping of
weekday
kids shows like Mr. Wizard in favor of more-profitable action
series. It revisits
the battlefields in the continuing conflict between success in the
marketplace
and an informed citizenry from the Communications Act of 1934 to the
watered-down Children's Television Act of 1990. The U.S. is
virtually the
only country in the world to allow commercial interests almost
unfettered
control over what enters our living rooms.

Al Gore observes: "We're strip mining our children's minds and we're
doing it
for commercial profit without any concern for the consequences for
them or
our society."

What can be done? Teach the Children shows how parents and educators
can follow the lead of groups like the PTA and teach critical
viewing skills to
children. Groups like Action for Children's Television demonstrate
how to
lobby local stations and politicians to limit commercials and to
press for more
educational content in children's television.

"I urge anyone concerned about the influence of television on
young minds
not to overlook this important report"
-- New York Daily News

"Shows how this unparalleled educational medium, could also serve
as an
instrument of commercial child abuse."
-- Erik Barnouw, author, Tube of Plenty

"A provocative summary of what we know...worth watching for all
students
of media."
-- Ellen Wartella, University of Illinois

"A sound, comprehensive presentation useful to citizens and
professionals
concerned with improving children's television."
-- Aletha C. Huston, University of Kansas

ON TELEVISION: THE VIOLENCE FACTOR

Producer: On Television, Ltd.
Director: Mary Magee
56 minutes, 1984

Fistfights, shootouts, car crashes, rapes... Take your pick.
Violence is
ubiquitous on television, sometimes gory and gruesome, other times
antiseptic
and remote. This classic study remains the only documentary to
examine TV
violence, ask why it's so commonplace and investigate its impact on
our
behavior and attitudes.

Clips form action-adventure series, Saturday morning cartoons, the
nightly
news and MTV are interwoven with comments by Dr. George Comstock and
other scholars and producers to provide a taxonomy of TV violence.
Prime
time programs average eight hostile acts per hour; children's shows
four times
as much. Violence is depicted as a normal, justified response to
conflict and
threat. Identification with the aggressor is encouraged; domination
and
submission are often equated with eroticism.

Dr. George Gerbner reviews 30 years of research and reports that
heavy TV
viewers perceive the world to be a meaner and more dangerous place
than
light viewers: "They buy more guns and more watchdogs. They are more
insecure, more apprehensive and more dependent on authority."

Network executives disagree, criticizing the research as "flawed."
The head of
standards and practices at ABS states, "Network guidelines prohibit
the
glorification of violence." A-Team creator Stephen Cannel defends
his work
as "just fantasy."

Congress has held hearings on excessive television violence ever
since Sen.
Kefauver convened the first inquiry in 1951. Everyone deplores the
violence -
and nothing ever changes. In a fascinating "circle of blame" public
interest
groups blame the networks, a government official blames advertisers,
a media
analyst blames the government, an ad man blames technology and a
network
executive blames us. "The audience," claims former NBC chairman
Grant
Tinker, "gets what it wants and, therefore, what it deserves."

The Violence Factor shows that people can make a difference. It
challenges
us to help program rather than be programmed by television. It
encourages
viewers, young and old, to be more selective and critical, to police
the violent
imagery television brings into our living rooms each night.

"This is a program that every American should see."
-- Choice

"A thoughtful, provocative, comprehensive, forthright documentary
which
challenges its audience as well as the industry. Pulls no punches."
-- New York Daily News

"A provocative examination of TV violence, which has become
another 20th
century problem, like toxic waste and smog."
-- Associated Press

ON TELEVISION: PUBLIC TRUST OR PRIVATE PROPERTY

Producer: On Television, Ltd.
Director: Mary Magee
56 minutes, 1988

Public Trust or Private Property poses the key question underlying
50
turbulent years of U.S. communications policy. Most viewers will be
surprised
to learn that they, the public, own the airwaves. But, the
Communication Acto
of 1934 authorizes the licensing of commercial broadcasters to
develop this
scarce national resource in exchange for serving "the public
interest,
convenience and necessity."

Former Reagan FCC commissioner Mark Fowler and heads of the three
networks assert that the public's interest is what interests the
public; the
government regulation. Media reformers Henry Geller, Ralph Nader,
Fred
Friendly, Dr. C. Everett Parker and Senators Tim Wirth and Ernest
Hollings
respond that, in a democracy, information is too important simply
"to be bait
to get viewers to look at commercials."

Public Trust or Private Property tests these competing claims
through three
in-depth case studies. The first analyzes the merger mania sweeping
the
television industry resulting in the sale of all three networks. In
congressional
testimony, network executives declare they will not sacrifice public
service
programming for increased profits. But news anchors reveal deep cuts
in their
budgets and pressure for more soft news, "more heat and less light,"
as one
puts it.

The film examines license renewal through the 1963 case of WLBT in
Jackson, Mississippi. WLBT refused to sell time to black candidates
or to
cover the Civil Rights Movement while airing Ku Klux Klan programs,
even
though Jackson's Population was almost 50% black. after a Vigorous
public
interest campaign, for the first and only time a station's license
renewal was
denied for ignoring community needs. WLBT later became the first
minority-owned television station in the country.

Public Trust or Private Property explains the Fairness Doctrine
through the
1984 case of WTVH, a Syracuse New York station which ran ads
favoring
nuclear power plant construction. A local peace group petitioned the
FCC
which told the station to produce a series of spots advocation the
opposing
viewpoint.

The only overview of U.S. television policy, Public Trust or Private
Property is indispensable viewing for all students of Mass
Communications,
Broadcasting, Communications Law and Government, as well as any
citizen
concerned about the future of telecommunications.

"Lays out the issues clearly and strongly..."
-- Bill Moyers

"Goes to the heart of the political and economic issues
surrounding
television, the owner's right to make money versus the viewer's
right to
diverse programming."
-- The New York Times

"Not only frames the debate, but shows how viewers at home can
participate...A serious effort to deal with a serious problem."
-- Newsday

"An important education for America's families. If parents and
teachers act
on its message, television could become a valuable educational tool
for young
audiences."
-- Peggy Charen, Action for Children's Television

RACE AGAINST PRIME TIME

Producer/Director: David Shulman
58 minutes, 1985

Race Against Prime Time is the only film to scrutinize howtelevision
news
represents African Americans. This hard-hitting documentary takes us
behind
the scenes at the newsrooms of the three network affiliates during
the Liberty
City uprising in Miami which left 18 dead. It provides a classic
case study of
how the news gets made: what we see - and what we don't.

Race Against Prime Time documents how local television newsmenanoint
black community spokespersons, characterize whites as victims and
blacks as
rioters and fail to place the disturbances within the context of and
decades of
civic neglect. This film reminds us that twenty-five years after the
Kerner
report decried media prejudice, news reporting remains very much a
white
view of black realities.

Highly teleliterate...A persuasive indictment of media
stereotypes."
-- Village Voice

An admirable work which gets down to particulars."
-- New York Times

For ordering information, contact:

California Newsreel
149 Ninth Street/ 420
San Francisco CA 94103
415-621-6196
415-621-6522

Email: Newsreel