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Lesson Plans


[Fwd: THE CORE OF ART?]

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Robert Beeching (robprod)
Sat, 17 Jan 1998 14:20:20 -0800


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MZ

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Message-ID: <34C12D02.FEFC26E9> Date: Sat, 17 Jan 1998 14:13:22 -0800 From: Robert Beeching <robprod> Reply-To: robprod Organization: Robert Beeching Productions X-Mozilla-Draft-Info: internal/draft; vcard=0; receipt=0; uuencode=0; html=0; linewidth=0 X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.02 [en] (Win95; I) MIME-Version: 1.0 To: "artsednet" <artsednet> Subject: THE CORE OF ART? Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Melissa Chaney wrote:

"Does anyone have any ideas on ways to teach "principles and elements" of art to 7th graders." ------------------------rb

The "principles and elements" of any core subject are usually taught by problem- solving. In other words, "testing premises."

EXAMPLE:

COLOR can be introduced by students mixing and testing color attributes.

QUESTION: What color would you use to shade the dark side of a lemon?

ANSWER: It's "complement."

The dynamics of the "principles and elements" must be tested, i.e continuous line; light and shade; texture, and composition. Each element is introduced as a discrete problem, i.e. draft a simple "space division", i.e. Mondrian. Let's use warm colors for this exercise, i.e. YELLOW, ORANGE, and RED, and place a DARK COLOR AGAINST A LIGHT COLOR.

Can we do the same with COOL COLORS?: GREEN, BLUE, and VIOLET.

What we find here is that the student is testing his/her knowledge of the basic uses of COLOR in a composition. After these preliminary exercises, the student can then apply the "P and Es" to drawings, paintings and construction assignments. TEST! THEN APPLY!

SEE: <http//members.tripod.com/~robprod/index.html>

Gary Bogus wrote:

..."kids work on large paper with crayons taking up to two months on one picture."

---------------------------------------------rb

This would be like working on the same math problem for two months; I would go crazy! The problem, is a lack of a sequence ordering of events. Teaching art is no different from that of teaching, reading, writing, and arithmetic; we exercise in short succinct modules; progression seems to be missing here?

ON MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES:

Use oil pastels instead of hard wax crayons which tend to have more wax than color.

OIL PASTELS DELIVER MORE COLOR AND ARE EASIER ON THE FINGERS.

Large paper requires large "actions." The smaller the child, the larger the vehicle, i.e. felt pen, pastel or brush. A #12 watercolor round brush is a universal size to consider. Throw away those "eye lash-sized brushes found in WC pans. They tend to encourage endless scrubbing!

Stand up over your work and use full body and arm movements in "rhythm." When one is sitting down and one's hand is glued to the desk, little continuous movement can occur! These "start-and-stop" lines destroy continuity!

SEE: <http//:members.tripod.com/~robprod/index.html>

GOOD LUCK!

------------------------rb

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MZ

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