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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #537

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
lynak (lynak)
Sat, 17 Jan 1998 11:45:40 -0800


I teach younger students and I think your right on target with doing
projects in only one or two art sessions. It's been my experience that
younger students need variety or they loose interest. Just my opinion.

----------
> From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest.edu>
> To: artsednet-digest.edu
> Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #537
> Date: Friday, January 16, 1998 3:47 AM
>
>
> artsednet-digest Friday, January 16 1998 Volume 02 : Number
537
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: Mac vs. PC
> Fused glass
> Re: Mac vs. PC
> Time spent on elemenatry art projects
> Re: Fused glass
> Re: Time spent on elemenatry art projects
> a small dose of inspiration for artists & art teachers and art students
> Re: Mac vs. PC
> Please pardon the intrusion
> Please pardon the intrusion
> Re: elementary report cards
> Re: elementary report cards
> Re: music in art room
> Re: music in art room
> Re: Art Projects in East Africa
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 20:07:02 -0500 (EST)
> From: Wade Cox <wc21808>
> Subject: Re: Mac vs. PC
>
> In reply to your question, I think that you will find that most people
> will be biased toward whatever machine they have had experience with.
For
> me, it would have to be a Mac. If price is that much of an issue, then
> I think it would just a little more shopping around, maybe through
> catalogues and such, but I'm sure that you can find a excellent Mac for
a
> decent price. I would also have to agree with Christine Merriam, tell
> your hubby to see what kind of computers the professionals are using...
> maybe that will give him a better idea.
>
>
> Wade Cox
> wc21808
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 15:55:57 -1000
> From: David Zimmerman <fastedy>
> Subject: Fused glass
>
> Christy:
>
> I run a summer art program in which we did fused glass with kids aged 6 -
> 12. I also took a workshop on it last fall. We made some wonderful
> tropical fish in bright colors and mask-like faces. The pieces can be
made
> into jewelry, refridgerator magnets, pins or hung in windows as
> mini-stained glass. The instructor used all sorts of scraps of glasss
from
> stained glass and his various glass projects. The pieces were layered on
> top of each other in abstract designs or small pictures and held in place
> with small dots of carpenters glue applied with a toothpick. (Its a bit
> thicker and tackier than elmers and burns off in the firing process.) We
> also layered pieces of scrap copper, and thin colored glass filament.
When
> dry, you can gently pick up the piece and place it in the kiln where it
is
> fired briefly. The pieces melt just enough to join together but not so
> much that they melt completely into one another. For exact firing times
> and temps you'd need to consult a book or glass artist, I'm afraid.
>
> At first I was very excited about this thinking I would be able to do it
in
> my clay kiln with ceramics students. However the glass artist explained
> that a specific type of kiln wash is necessary to prevent the pieces from
> sticking to the shelves, and the kiln must be absolutely spotless. He
> recommended against doing it in the same kiln used for clay. You need a
> kiln in which you can tightly control temperature and firing time--he
> suggested a computerized kiln.
>
> I have other ideas for applying this process to clay which I haven't
tried
> yet. Specifically, I'd like to make small clay masks or tiles and leave
> indentations in them where I can lay scrap glass to melt in the second
> firing. I'd love to hear other ideas about combining these two
processes.
>
> Deb Rosenbaum
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 98 20:15:08 -0600
> From: Melissa Enderle <enderlml.wi.us>
> Subject: Re: Mac vs. PC
>
> O.k. I'll admit it. I'm a biased, loyal Mac user. This past September I
> bought a powerbook 3400, a mobile companion to my desktop Mac. The
> Macintosh system, with its graphic interface dating back to the founding
> 1980's, is still the computer of choice for graphics professionals. The
> Macintosh system boasts solid performance, lower rates of troubles, and
> far fewer virus plagues. In the last few years, Macs have been the speed
> demons- not PC's. With the introduction of the G3 processors, Macs have
> once again showed their speed supremacy over PC's.
> Apple Company has made some positive steps in marketing its excellent
> product. It has dropped its prices, making them comparable to PC's. It
> also has begun to increase its local presence, with large sections of
> CompUSA's being devoted to Mac computers, software- and Mac-savy workers.

> Truthfully, I can't even think of not using a Mac. It simply is the best
> - - and most friendly- computer, especially for graphics individuals.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 18:06:09 -0800
> From: gbogus (Gary Bogus)
> Subject: Time spent on elemenatry art projects
>
> A colleague and I are in disagreement about how much time young (grades 1
> through 5) art students should spend on drawing projects. Classes are 45
> minutes once a week, class size 18 -27 students. She has kids work on
large
> paper with crayons, taking up to two months on one picture. I think this
is
> too much time spent on one picture, and that smaller, more immediate
> projects should be presented, particularly to the third grade and below.
I
> tend to gear my projects to something that can be completed in one, or at
> the most two, classes, with the upper grades doing one or two longer-run
> projects per year. Of course, we may do several pre-teaches, looking at
> examples or practicing skills, but overall I like to try to work smaller
> and faster.
>
> Opinions, anyone? I promise to take all the shots with good grace.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 23:02:30 -0500
> From: p-lstudio (betti longinotti)
> Subject: Re: Fused glass
>
> Make sure that the glass you are using is glass that 'can' be fused to
> each other. Scraps of glass may look like just scraps...but they have
> different reciprocities (different rates of contraction and expansion).
> In my last post I listed some manufacturers of fusible glass.
> Kilns...You can use a ceramic kiln just fine. You can lay fiberfrax
> 'paper' on the shelves or floor bottom of your kiln. You can also use
> an enameling kiln. There are some wonderful glass kilns out on the
> market now, designed for the specific purpose of firing glass- more
> horizontal flat floor space versus vertical space, designed for pottery.
> Some of these have the computerized automatic controllers but this is
> not a requirement for firing glass. Once you've fired glass a few times
> you will get a feel for the temperature you desire, for the types of
> glass you are using. A pyrometer on your kiln is really helpful to
> gauge the kiln's temperture and firing schedule. When firing glass you
> should also make sure you anneal it properly, or your glass pieces may
> be subject to cracking.
>
> In Art & Life,
> Betti L.
> p-lstudio
> or on the www at
> http://www.angelfire.com/nc/plstudio
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 23:16:47 -0600
> From: Scurfield <scurfield>
> Subject: Re: Time spent on elemenatry art projects
>
> Gary Bogus wrote:
> >
> > A colleague and I are in disagreement about how much time young (grades
1
> > through 5) art students should spend on drawing projects. Classes are
45
> > minutes once a week, class size 18 -27 students. She has kids work on
large
> > paper with crayons, taking up to two months on one picture. I think
this is
> > too much time spent on one picture, and that smaller, more immediate
> > projects should be presented, particularly to the third grade and
below. I
> > tend to gear my projects to something that can be completed in one, or
at
> > the most two, classes, with the upper grades doing one or two
longer-run
> > projects per year. Of course, we may do several pre-teaches, looking at
> > examples or practicing skills, but overall I like to try to work
smaller
> > and faster.
> >
> > Opinions, anyone? I promise to take all the shots with good grace.
>
> Personally, I agree with you Gary. I like my lessons to interrelate, of
> course, but in my opinion, the primary grades don't have the attention
> span for lessons which last much longer than two weeks. I like to do
> units with the upper grades--series of interconnecting lessons. It's
> easier to accomplish the objectives of DBAE that way.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 15 Jan 1998 16:05:00 -0600
> From: Katherine Giltinan <k.giltinan>
> Subject: a small dose of inspiration for artists & art teachers and art
students
>
> Your Life Holds Unlimited Potential
> and Wonderful Dreams
>
> You have the ability
> to attain whatever you seek;
> within you is every potential
> you can imagine.
> Always aim higher than
> you believe you can reach.
> So often, you'll discover
> that when your talents
> are set free
> by your imagination,
> you can acheive any goal.
> If people offer their
> help or wisdom
> as you go through life,
> accept it gratefully.
> You can learn much from those
> who have gone before you.
> But never be afraid or hesitant
> to step off the accepted path
> and head off in your own direction
> if your heart tells you
> that it's the right way for you.
> Always believe that you will
> ultimately succeed
> at whatever you do,
> and never forget the value
> of persistence, discipline,
> and determination.
> You are meant to be
> whatever you dream
> of becoming.
>
> - --Edmund O'Neill
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 02:36:07 -0500 (EST)
> From: GTBlack
> Subject: Re: Mac vs. PC
>
> If you search the job pages of companies that create computer animation,
> multimedia programs, games and websites I think you'll find they tend to
> prefer PCs. Softimage, a high end 3D program, isn't even offered on Mac
> ....... Graphic design is a coin flip. I know as many artists that work
on
> PC as Mac.
>
> - -Geoff Black
>
> Kristin Bouton wrote:
> >>My husband is about to start a degree in graphic
> design, with the possibility of moving into computer graphic
> animation. We are going to by a new computer, but we don't know
> whether to buy a Mac or a PC. It seems like we can get a lot
> more computer for our money if we buy a PC, but I have always
> heard that the Mac is better for graphic design. I have also
> read somewhere recently, however that the PC is catching up
> to the Mac in graphic performance. So what should we do?
> Kristin Bouton<<
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 01:06:50 -0500 (EST)
> From: Reminder.NET
> Subject: Please pardon the intrusion
>
> I am not on the internet to burden you with unsolicited advertising and
> if I've offended you in any way, I do sincerely apologize. To be removed
from
> this list, simply reply to this message with "Capitalist Pig!" in the
subject field.
>
> My point is brief, in that I would like to aquaint you with a service
> that you've probably never heard of and, since you're in the United
States,
> is available to you at very little cost.
>
> You might just throw away your calender for good once you see my
website.
> Take a quick look at
http://www.freeyellow.com/members2/supervisor/NRS1.html
>
> End Intrusion.
>
> Cordially,
> BCA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 01:14:51 -0500 (EST)
> From: Reminder.NET
> Subject: Please pardon the intrusion
>
> I am not on the internet to burden you with unsolicited advertising and
> if I've offended you in any way, I do sincerely apologize. To be removed
from
> this list, simply reply to this message with "Capitalist Pig!" in the
subject field.
>
> My point is brief, in that I would like to aquaint you with a service
> that you've probably never heard of and, since you're in the United
States,
> is available to you at very little cost.
>
> You might just throw away your calender for good once you see my
website.
> Take a quick look at
http://www.freeyellow.com/members2/supervisor/NRS1.html
>
> End Intrusion.
>
> Cordially,
> BCA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 05:09:34 -0600
> From: "Lily/Clair Kerns" <CWKerns>
> Subject: Re: elementary report cards
>
> Please, please, somewhere in there recognize creative thinking
> skills--however you choose to word them, these 5 are basics...
>
> comes up with many ideas
> comes up with many different kinds of ideas
> has unique ideas
> builds on an ideas ( "one idea leads to another")
> embellishes (adds details) ideas.
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Church-- http://198.139.157.15/fumcmarionvilleumw
> Art Teachers-- http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 05:09:34 -0600
> From: "Lily/Clair Kerns" <CWKerns>
> Subject: Re: elementary report cards
>
> Please, please, somewhere in there recognize creative thinking
> skills--however you choose to word them, these 5 are basics...
>
> comes up with many ideas
> comes up with many different kinds of ideas
> has unique ideas
> builds on an ideas ( "one idea leads to another")
> embellishes (adds details) ideas.
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Church-- http://198.139.157.15/fumcmarionvilleumw
> Art Teachers-- http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 05:41:33 -0600
> From: "Lily/Clair Kerns" <CWKerns>
> Subject: Re: music in art room
>
> I believe that if a school-wide policy exists, every teacher should
follow
> it for the
> sake of consistency and esprit de corps. You might consider buying a
boom
> box with tape
> and/or CD capability for your classroom. Many teachers at school do
this.
> I don't
> allow students to handle it, however, since it gets to be a distraction
when
> they use it
> rewind their tapes (saves Walkman batteries) or replay the same song over
> and over, or
> crank up the volume. If they want to play their own tapes or CDs, they
have
> to hand it
> to me; if I think the lyrics may be questionable, I won't play it.
> >>
> I've tried allowing them to choose the music, to use their personal
walkmans
> / headphones (provided the volume was turned down enough that only they
> could hear it!) , sometimes I gave them a choice of my music or none
with
> absolutely no talking while they worked. For some projects--no choice.
I
> finally settled for using music only for selected projects with my choice
of
> music.
>
> I found that the type of music being played can have a BIG influence on
the
> work accomplished as well as the general atmosphere in the room. Best
> choices--melodic, NO Words, flute is especially good. Guess whose choices
> those are...
>
> I tried this one time in a 3-4 grade room, giving each 10 minutes with
the
> headphones and a Zamfir tape with pan pipes (one little cheap tape
recorder
> for 29 kids). That day they were to draw 3 overlapping figures (head and
> shoulders starting with ovals) . One boy's drawing was typical for the
> age--but during the 10 minutes he used the headphones, he did the most
> intricately detailed neckline/necklace section. When he passed the
> headphones on, he went back to the style he'd used in the first half of
the
> period.
>
> Lily
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Church-- http://198.139.157.15/fumcmarionvilleumw
> Art Teachers-- http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 05:41:33 -0600
> From: "Lily/Clair Kerns" <CWKerns>
> Subject: Re: music in art room
>
> I believe that if a school-wide policy exists, every teacher should
follow
> it for the
> sake of consistency and esprit de corps. You might consider buying a
boom
> box with tape
> and/or CD capability for your classroom. Many teachers at school do
this.
> I don't
> allow students to handle it, however, since it gets to be a distraction
when
> they use it
> rewind their tapes (saves Walkman batteries) or replay the same song over
> and over, or
> crank up the volume. If they want to play their own tapes or CDs, they
have
> to hand it
> to me; if I think the lyrics may be questionable, I won't play it.
> >>
> I've tried allowing them to choose the music, to use their personal
walkmans
> / headphones (provided the volume was turned down enough that only they
> could hear it!) , sometimes I gave them a choice of my music or none
with
> absolutely no talking while they worked. For some projects--no choice.
I
> finally settled for using music only for selected projects with my choice
of
> music.
>
> I found that the type of music being played can have a BIG influence on
the
> work accomplished as well as the general atmosphere in the room. Best
> choices--melodic, NO Words, flute is especially good. Guess whose choices
> those are...
>
> I tried this one time in a 3-4 grade room, giving each 10 minutes with
the
> headphones and a Zamfir tape with pan pipes (one little cheap tape
recorder
> for 29 kids). That day they were to draw 3 overlapping figures (head and
> shoulders starting with ovals) . One boy's drawing was typical for the
> age--but during the 10 minutes he used the headphones, he did the most
> intricately detailed neckline/necklace section. When he passed the
> headphones on, he went back to the style he'd used in the first half of
the
> period.
>
> Lily
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Church-- http://198.139.157.15/fumcmarionvilleumw
> Art Teachers-- http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 1980 23:50:02 +0300
> From: ttipton.tz
> Subject: Re: Art Projects in East Africa
>
> Internet is available but not yet at the school I teach in. It is
> sporadic, haphazard, inconsistent, and unreliable when it is
> available. At this point, I only have email so I'm missing all these
> great web sites and the Getty site as resource materials. Many times
> I will not see the post I sent to the Getty as part of my mail
> messages, so forgive me if I've sent them off again and you received
> them the first time. Mail quite regularly doesn't go through whether
> it's email or surface mail.
>
> I'm in a private school, well-equipped with art supplies. More than I
> could have imagined for a school just starting an art program.
> I'm trained in DBAE along with a variety of other approaches
> including my own art training as a visual artist, curriculum
> specialist, and administrator, so I bring alot of all of that to the
> work I'm doing.
>
> I'm teaching K-6, team teaching with the classroom teacher in
> 80-minute blocks once a week. I rotate through a term seeing 1/2 of
> these kids every week; then switch with the other 1/2. The classroom
> teacher carries on without me after planning the lessons during
> built-in plannig meetings which I just was able to get added to my
> rotation schedule. The school has a second art room for this purpose
> when the students aren't seeing me. Until they get a second art
> teacher, this was a better compromise than seeing the whole lot every
> two weeks until I get more help prepping materials and cleaning up
> from lessons.
>
> As a result, my focus varies from project-based to concept-based
> lessons. There are some art visuals here but I brought my own with
> slides anticipating their lack and unavailability locally, so my art
> history intro to a lesson comes from this source material. I am
> trying to use local materials when available, such as bark cloth, but
> most other things used locally are imported from India. Right now the
> kinds of arts projects I'm working on are clay vessels with lids
> enclosing a mystery item (made separately); calligraphy of personal
> poems; batik and tye-dye khanga cloths; paper mache masks using
> African masks as the inspiration; an outdoor mural; propoganda and
> visual contradictions using montages; and sculptural inventions. I
> just offered an in-serviee for teachers on "Reading Visual Content in
> Children's Art." Several classes on their own are doing postcards for
> an exchange with Joy Sokero from her postcard idea a while back.
>
> Art supplies are ordered from Europe and the United States one year
> in advance. I have a very healthy supply budget of $17,000 for 550
> kids, but in real terms after shipping it's $15,000. I had alot of
> fun spending that much money and allows me to order specialty things
> that I ordinarily brought into artist-in-residencies such as
> iridescent paper, foils, watercolor pencils, mylar, etc. that many school

> budgets can't afford. I put my order in for next year this October; it
took
> until December to make it an offical order and will be July when it
> arrives most likely. Until the recent opening in trade, supplies had to
be
> ordered 3 years in advance. In fact, a music order just arrived that
> was ordered 3 years ago. Theft in shipments is a big issue, so it's
> difficult to predict availability even with an order.
>
> There is a large Indian community in Dar, so there are some things
> available locally that are used in cultural celebrations such as
> Diwalli and are incorporated into elaborate adornments. There is no
> art supply store here at all. I had a shock recently when
> I went to buy a piece of 150-lb watercolor paper and it was $21!
> There is no local source for acrylic paints or oil paints, although I
> have seen watercolors at a local office supply store recently (the
> same place as the watercolor paper!) The problem is that there is no
> centralized distribution system for anything, so it makes finding
> things difficult. One store may carry one item; another store may
> care another. You have to find these things out word of mouth because
> many of these places don't have phones or there is no electricity; or
> there is no inventory so people don't know even when they do have a
> phone, whether it's available.
>
> The best source of material right now is personal couriering via
> friends and teachers traveling to Dar, as will be the case for a
> couple of art exchange projects I'm doing with teachers as a result
> of our communication via this listserve.
>
> Thanks for your inquiry. It's been really important for me to connect
> with my peers and colleagues by email - they're not available
> locally!
>
> Regards,
> Teresa Tipton
>
>
> From: Nancy Walkup <Walkup.EDU>
> To: ttipton.tz
> Cc: artsednet.edu
> Subject: Re: East Africa -Reply
>
> Teresa:
>
> Thanks for the commentary about East Africa. The situation sounds much
> like Haiti, supposedly the poorest country in the western hemisphere.
> How do you manage to have Internet access? What kinds of art
> instruction are you providing?
>
> Nancy
>
>
>
> Nancy Walkup
> Project Coordinator
> North Texas Institute for Educators on the Visual Arts
> PO Box 305100 University of North Texas
> Denton, TX 76203
> walkup
> 940.565.3986
> FAX 940-565-4867
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #537
> *******************************
>
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