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Lesson Plans


Re: ART TRAINING CONTINUED... -Reply

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Robert Beeching (robprod)
Thu, 08 Jan 1998 13:44:21 -0800


Nancy Walkup wrote:

> Robert:
>
> I must respectfully disagree with your statement that "There is little
> continuity in art at the elementary levels of instruction. If we
> taught other subjects in the same hit-and-miss vein, we would be in
> deep trouble!"
>
> I think such broad generalizations and negative attitudes towards
> elementary art education are damaging. I know firsthand of many
> elementary art teachers out in the field who are devoting their
> efforts to providing comprehensive, meaningful, and sequential art
> education. Your attitude is also a slight to the teachers subscribed
> to ArtsEdNet - I find that, for the most part, the people on ArtsEdNet
> are the ones who have a strong dedication to the profession and their
> students and are working for positive changes.
>
> I know there are many problems out in the field, but I would rather
> focus my energy on working to improve the situation that complaining
> about it.
>
> Respectfully,
>
> Nancy
>
> Nancy Walkup
> Project Coordinator
> North Texas Institute for Educators on the Visual Arts
> PO Box 305100 University of North Texas
> Denton, TX 76203
> walkup
> 940.565.3986
> FAX 940-565-4867
>
> >>> Robert Beeching <robprod> 01/07/98 04:54pm >>>
> Deborah wrote 01/05/98
>
> "Not many of our elementary age students will end up in a career in
> the field of art, so to focus primarily - at that age level - on art
> training would be to miss..."
>
> What are we saying here? Shall we dispense with teaching children to
> read, write, and compute, because they may never become authors, or
> mathematicians? Of course not!
>
> Beginning with kindergarten, children are "eye-hand" coordination
> trained every day. Without training children from an early age when
> they
> are supple and flexible, we are relegating them to a life of
> "non-verbal" rigidity found in most adults - "A FEAR OF DRAWING."
> This
> does not have to be the case. How much better to teach a kindergartner
> that a brush is not a "scrub mop" than it is to allow this
> inappropriate activity to fester through the grades.
>
> All children have the capacity to learn to draw, paint, and to
> construct, as they have the capacity to learn to read, write, and to
> compute. The basic reason they are allowed to stay at a low level of
> proficiency in art at the elementary level is simply because they are
> not taught in the same sequence order of content as they are in other
> disciplines. There is little continuity in art at the elementary
> levels
> of instruction. If we taught other subjects in the same hit-and-miss
> vein, we would be in deep trouble!
>
> BEAUTY IS AS BEAUTY DOES! LOOKING AT THE WORKS OF OTHERS WITHOUT
> FIRST
> LEARNING HOW BEAUTY IS CREATED, IS AN ANOMALY!
> -------------------------------rb
>
> --
> MZ*
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Part 1.2 Type: Internet E-Mail Message (message/rfc822)

--
MZ