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Lesson Plans


Nancy Walkup's queston -Reply

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Nancy Walkup (Walkup.EDU)
Wed, 07 Jan 1998 11:27:17 -0600


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Dear Ellen:

Thanks for sharing. I strongly believe that art reflects the culture
in which it is produced and that our understanding of an artwork is
greatly enhanced by knowledge of its cultural context. Just to give a
quick example, several years ago our institute produced a print set of
25 artworks from local museums. In researching the artworks and
artists, our initial lukewarm responses to some of the works was
completely turned around as we learned more about them. All 25 became
"old friends."

Nancy

Nancy Walkup
Project Coordinator
North Texas Institute for Educators on the Visual Arts
PO Box 305100 University of North Texas
Denton, TX 76203
walkup
940.565.3986
FAX 940-565-4867

>>> <WOODOFFE.SC.US> 01/07/98 08:21am >>>
I have been a voyeur on the listserv for months now. This time I feel
compelled
to reply to the question posed by Nancy Walkup..."how much of an
artist's life
do we need to know to fully appreciate the work?"

In my oppinion the more we know about the life AND times of an artist,
the
better we can understand not only the work, but the human experience,
history
of our civilization, other cultures...the questions of life in
general.

I believe this bigger picture of understanding beyond the work is what
fascinates and enriches our lives. I feel we can better understand the
human
psyche when we can see how for instance, WWII influenced the art
during and
shortly after. Look at the abstract expressionist movement and see
what the war
did to us. Or look at the Renaissance and see how the strife, the
plaque, the
pope and religion, etc., effected human conscience.

Ellen Woodoff
Columbia, SC

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Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 08:21:22 -0600
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Subject: Nancy Walkup's queston
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I have been a voyeur on the listserv for months now. This time I feel
compelled
to reply to the question posed by Nancy Walkup..."how much of an
artist's life
do we need to know to fully appreciate the work?"

In my oppinion the more we know about the life AND times of an artist,
the
better we can understand not only the work, but the human experience,
history
of our civilization, other cultures...the questions of life in
general.

I believe this bigger picture of understanding beyond the work is what
fascinates and enriches our lives. I feel we can better understand the
human
psyche when we can see how for instance, WWII influenced the art
during and
shortly after. Look at the abstract expressionist movement and see
what the war
did to us. Or look at the Renaissance and see how the strife, the
plaque, the
pope and religion, etc., effected human conscience.

Ellen Woodoff
Columbia, SC

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  • Maybe reply: Nancy Walkup: "Re: Nancy Walkup's queston -Reply"