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Lesson Plans


Re: Product

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Nalin (nalin)
Sat, 11 Jan 1997 08:12:20 -0700 (MST)


Christine Johnsons's posting remainded me that awhile ago, someone (sorry I
can't remember who) was interested in assessment issues. In Arizona, our
dept. of Ed. developed a series of performance based assessments with mixed
reviews. The state moved to develop rubrics of quality standards. For
reporting studnet achievement, it was necessary that I adopt the same
structure for art. Below is one unit's production rubric for a 4th grade
Pueblo pottery unit. The student's created an owl form in clay and
decorated with paint (glazes are not part of my budget).

The scores are 4 to 0, with 4 being outstanding. There is alway room for
improvement, so please don't scold me on the content, just the structure.

Zuni Storyteller Owl
********************

Level 4: Construction - Owl is well-crafted, with smooth, undimpled,
rounded or egg-shaped body that has been slip joined and visible evidence
of seam is not existent or slight and owl sits flatly. Additions (wings,
tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are securely attached. Decoration - (paint or
glaze) has been applied evenly and flatly (unmodulated) to create clearly
defined patterns or designs that are appropriate to the artform (no hearts,
ying-yang signs, etc.). A balance of decorated and non-decorated areas is
achieved.

Level 3 Construction - Owl is well-crafted, with almost smooth
surface, some dimpling, rounded or egg-shaped body that has been slip
joined and visible evidence of seam is seem but does not detract from the
overall appearance or positioning. Additions (wings, tail, beak, horns, and
eyes) are securely attached. Decoration - (paint or glaze) has been
applied evenly and flatly (unmodulated) to create clearly defined patterns
or designs that are appropriate to the artform (no hearts, ying-yang signs,
etc.). There is either too much or too little decorative patterns or
designs.

Level 2: Construction - Owl is fairly-crafted, with large areas of
dimpling and/or fine to shallow cracking. The body that has been slip
joined and visible evidence of seam is seems to detract from the overall
appearance or the overall shape is lopsided and does not sit flat.
Additions (wings, tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are attached but the
surface not blended to secure or improve appearance. Decoration - (paint
or glaze) has been applied unevenly and splotchy, and patterns or designs
are haphazardly placed or incomplete Designs may be inappropriate to the
artform ( hearts, ying-yang signs, smilies, words or letters, etc.). There
is either too much or too little decorative patterns and designs.

Level 1: Construction - Owl is poorly-crafted, with most areas of
dimpled and having shallow to large cracks and holes. The body that has
been poorly joined or separations or gaps between surfaces of seam is
evident The overall shape is lopsided and does not sit flat. Additions
(wings, tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are missing or not attached properly
to the surface. Decoration - (paint or glaze) has been applied unevenly
and splotchy, and patterns or designs are haphazardly placed or incomplete
Designs may be inappropriate to the artform ( hearts, ying-yang signs,
smilies, words or letters, etc.). There no decorative patterns or designs
(painted solid) or not decorated at all.

Level 0 Clay project submitted is not in the style of a Zuni Storyteller
Owl or is of another animal form. In addition, no effort or no project
submitted.

Then students rated various projects (from another class) on the rubric
system. They were extrememly accurate in their assessment of work that was
at level 4 or level 1 and made great arguments of why works should be
placed at specific levels.

I was not sure that this was productive way to teach, but I can say that
the emphasis on the quality of the product did in fact rasie the quality of
the product. Seems like a simple idea, n'est pas?

>I agree that both process and product are required.

[snip]

>Christine Johnson

>> Yes the process it important but not to the exclusion of
>> product.

[snip]

>> Maureen

Lorena Nalin
nalin
************************************
Elementary Art Specialist
at Los Ranchitos School
Tucson, AZ
&
President of the Arizona Art Education Association